#1
These are the ones that have been in the shop more than they should.

First one that comes to mind is the switchblade. Output transformers on those otherwise nothing else.

The newer mesa stuff especially the roadking an assortment of problems not just one thing.

65 Twin reverb reissue.Traces and tube sockets.

Have only seen 2 Bugeras so far thats a good thing.

As far as reliability goes peaveys are few and far between.

If you guys can stay away from amps that have the potentiometers mounted right to the boards they break fairly easy and can't be replaced without replacing the boards usually.
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#2
Thanks for the info, any common amps with pots on the board you can think of?
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#5
Quote by modernp

If you guys can stay away from amps that have the potentiometers mounted right to the boards they break fairly easy and can't be replaced without replacing the boards usually.


That's about all PCB Fenders, be it tubes, SS, new, reissues, and etc. But I think it's still do able, if you find a right dime-sized pot.
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#7
ok. thanks. how many of these break AFTER the warranty is up
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#8
Quote by modernp
If you guys can stay away from amps that have the potentiometers mounted right to the boards they break fairly easy and can't be replaced without replacing the boards usually.


+1 on the stay away from them.. But your off on the replacing the boards. You can replace the pots pretty easily and even upgrade them to traditional pots if you wanted. Also you can generally find original Fender replacement pots pretty easy. Been there done it more then once...

#9
Quote by Kevin Saale
Thanks for the info, any common amps with pots on the board you can think of?

it would probably be easier to name the ones that don't actually. Most of the new production amps made today have pots mounted to the PCBs. The only ones I know of that don't are the real boutique makers that handwire the amps. Most mesa's have the flying leads with chassis mounted pots, but I saw the inside of a RK, and all the knobs on the back were PCB mounted. All the new Marshalls, Orange, Peavey, ENGL, Framus, VHT, etc, have PCB mounted pots. I even saw the gut shots of a Bogner Shiva that had PCB mounted pots. At least all of them use a way to mount them to the chassis too, the scariest ones have the pot only connected to the PCB, and then sticking out thru the chassis.
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#11
Quote by Erock503
it would probably be easier to name the ones that don't actually. Most of the new production amps made today have pots mounted to the PCBs. The only ones I know of that don't are the real boutique makers that handwire the amps. Most mesa's have the flying leads with chassis mounted pots, but I saw the inside of a RK, and all the knobs on the back were PCB mounted. All the new Marshalls, Orange, Peavey, ENGL, Framus, VHT, etc, have PCB mounted pots. I even saw the gut shots of a Bogner Shiva that had PCB mounted pots. At least all of them use a way to mount them to the chassis too, the scariest ones have the pot only connected to the PCB, and then sticking out thru the chassis.


+1

Here is a perfect example of a great amp with the worst pot setup i have ever seen.

This is a pic of the last Blues junior i worked on.. Notice the pots are mounted there with no bracing whats so ever its just floating in there.


Also to elaborate a little more. Anytime your testing a amp give the pots a good push to see if they move. If they have a tremendous amount of play then you might want to really re-think about your purchase. If you gigging i honestly would avoid them like the plague, if its a bedroom amp its really not to big of a deal. But i have seen people drop something on the pot and it breaks. Basically just know what your getting into before you buy...
Last edited by IbanezPsycho at May 27, 2008,
#12
^yep, that's a good illustration.

Quote by Slayerdeath
you diddn`t say anything bout Marshall... is that good? LOL

what about the early 90`s JCM 900`s, any experiance with them.?

I saw the guts of a 92 Marshall Heritage 6101 combo, and it had PCB mounted pots. No experience with the 900 reliability, but there seem to be plenty of them still kicking. I don't really think it's too horrible to have PCB mounted pots, as long as they are quality pots, and are chassis mounted in addition.
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#13
Heres an example of a Marshall Pcb board i use for parts..


Notice all the pots are secured to a thick metal bracket then that is secured with rivets to the board. Also so you can compare, i put the fender pic in there as well. Both use the same setup but Marshall went the extra mile and it makes a huge difference in the build quality and reliability.



VS
#14
Thanks, IbanezPsycho! Great info!

I'll second your comments about Peavey amps. In general, they're pretty well built. One problem that I've seen a few times (twice on Bandit series amps) are dirty contacts in the leaf switches that are built into the effects loop jacks. When these get dirty then the effects loop isn't bypassed properly. These usually come in with very weak muddy output. You can trace it down to the effects loop jacks quickly by giving the jacks a tap with the butt end of a screwdriver. If the volume jumps or it crackles loudly, then the switch contacts are probably dirty. You can confirm by inserting a patch cable between the effects send and return. If the amp comes back to life, then that clinches it.
#15
How hard are you guys turning and yanking on the knobs? Seriously.
Marshall pots crap out all the time. Regardless of mounting.
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#16
Quote by Van Noord
How hard are you guys turning and yanking on the knobs? Seriously.
Marshall pots crap out all the time. Regardless of mounting.


Were just talking about there mounting stability not really the quality of the pot itself. Example you breaking a pot clean off the board. All pots are still prone to getting dirty and getting turned with to much force they break or just wear out. But take the Fender knobs there plastic shaft, tiny as hell and aren't mounted to anything for stability. Also they use chicken head knobs which are alot bigger and have more contact patch so if they are hit they deliver more force to the pot itself. Just turning the knobs on a Fender blues junior actually makes the pots wiggle and the main issue is usually something hitting them and knocking them off the pcb board. Example you lean over to check something behind the amp and your guitar smacks one of the knobs. It's pretty much a recipe for disaster on all counts. At least the Marshall's pots are mounted to something and have a metal shaft, so at least you don't have to worry about that aspect.

And you are correct about Marshall there by far the number one amp that comes into the shop. From cheap to expensive they all have issues. Normal symptoms are Bad pots, bad inputs and components going bad and frying the board.
Last edited by IbanezPsycho at May 27, 2008,
#17
Well, there seem to be a lot of Peavey valveking issues posted on this forum lately. But you pretty much covered that.

this is pretty much stating the obvious but:

Marshall MGs, from my experience, seem to have issues with the clean channel starting to deteriorate and go fuzzy, more distorted than the overdrive/crunch channels, this has happened to 2 out of 2 MG owners i know.

As for line 6 spiders, i know 1 person who owns one who has this problem, he says he knows a few people who have had the same problem, but random patch changes as a result of the knobs being loose and moving out of place due to the vibrations on the amp, or momentary rapid patch changes seem to be common problems. really piss-poor amps those 2...
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Last edited by Blompcube at May 27, 2008,
#18
There is a very good reason you don't see many Bugeras: not many people have them. It works the other way too. You can't really make any conclusions about reliability just by looking at how many come in for repairs.

Quote by Blompcube
Marshall MGs, from my experience, seem to have issues with the clean channel starting to deteriorate and go fuzzy, more distorted than the overdrive/crunch channels, this has happened to 2 out of 2 MG owners i know.


I've mainly seen them cutting out (not just for seconds, but several minutes).
Last edited by mr_hankey at May 27, 2008,
#19
This makes me happy that I have a handwired, ptp amp.
I don't have to worry about cheap pcb mounted pots like the ones in the Blues Junior.
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#20
Quote by IbanezPsycho
+1 on the stay away from them.. But your off on the replacing the boards. You can replace the pots pretty easily and even upgrade them to traditional pots if you wanted. Also you can generally find original Fender replacement pots pretty easy. Been there done it more then once...


If you know what your doing I agree but most amp guys will replace the board because their is less labor involved. Time is money.
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#21
I've seen and heard lots of Marshalls come in: 800 (great tone, terrible builds), 900, TSL, DSL - has to do partially with how the boards are made. You move them much and they'll start disconnecting. But this is common to factory made amps. Mesa's and other hand-made amps with floating leads don't have this particular problem of connections...
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#22
Quote by mr_hankey
There is a very good reason you don't see many Bugeras: not many people have them. It works the other way too. You can't really make any conclusions about reliability just by looking at how many come in for repairs.


I've mainly seen them cutting out (not just for seconds, but several minutes).

If you worked on amps and kept seeing a certain model coming in the door would you buy that amp for yourself?
Tom Anderson Hollow Classic
72 thin line tele

Barber trifecta fuzz
Mi audio Crunch Box
Clyde Wah
Barber Burn Unit
Ocean efx Texas deuce
Boomerang chorus delay
Barber ltd


1971 Pro reverb
Fender acoustasonic
Fender super champ xd
Last edited by modernp at May 27, 2008,
#23
Quote by IbanezPsycho
+1

Here is a perfect example of a great amp with the worst pot setup i have ever seen.

This is a pic of the last Blues junior i worked on.. Notice the pots are mounted there with no bracing whats so ever its just floating in there.


Also to elaborate a little more. Anytime your testing a amp give the pots a good push to see if they move. If they have a tremendous amount of play then you might want to really re-think about your purchase. If you gigging i honestly would avoid them like the plague, if its a bedroom amp its really not to big of a deal. But i have seen people drop something on the pot and it breaks. Basically just know what your getting into before you buy...

Great illustration
Tom Anderson Hollow Classic
72 thin line tele

Barber trifecta fuzz
Mi audio Crunch Box
Clyde Wah
Barber Burn Unit
Ocean efx Texas deuce
Boomerang chorus delay
Barber ltd


1971 Pro reverb
Fender acoustasonic
Fender super champ xd
#24
Quote by modernp
If you worked on amps and kept seeing a certain model coming in the door would you buy that amp for yourself?


Erm...maybe. But I do my own repairs.

My point is that's it's just a little too likely that some people will read this thread and decide that these amps you've mentioned are all terrible.
#25
my Marshall JCM 900 is in the shop today LOL

don`t know whats wrong though, the tech said it`s not nearly loud enuff.

at least they gave me another Marshall as a loner.
#26
Yikes, glad I didn't buy a Blues junior. How about the PV classics? I've had an issue. The speaker makes a poping noise whenever I turn it off. Not sure if I need something replaced...
#28
Quote by mcrfobtai
Yikes, glad I didn't buy a Blues junior. How about the PV classics? I've had an issue. The speaker makes a poping noise whenever I turn it off. Not sure if I need something replaced...


There actually really nice amps and everything else about them is tip top. Fender just made a really bad choice on the pot design... Most people just deal with it and be extra careful or take them to people like me to mod them. You can mount metal shaft pots directly to the chassis and just run leads to the pcb board and you have yourself a gig worthy amp...

Does the PV have a standby switch? If so flip that switch first then wait a few seconds then turn the power off. Problem solved...
#29
^ Nah, that's normal. It doesn't have a standby switch so it'd probably do that.
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#30
Quote by MrCarrot
^ Nah, that's normal. It doesn't have a standby switch so it'd probably do that.


+1

Just checked out a picture... And MrCarrot is correct most tube amps pop when you turn them off if you dont use or have a standby switch.
#31
Quote by mcrfobtai
Yikes, glad I didn't buy a Blues junior. How about the PV classics? I've had an issue. The speaker makes a poping noise whenever I turn it off. Not sure if I need something replaced...



i dont know. the blues jr has its problems, but it's worth the money as much as a classic 30 is.


and an exmple of a common lower end amp problem would be the loose input jack on the vox ad30.

doesnt mean you shouldnt consider that amp either.

most problems are easy enough to get around as long as you know going into it.
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