#1
Well i have decided to learn guitar, have been wanting to for a while but never got round to it. I have a crappy squier but its better than nothing and it will do for learning

I want to play song like cliffs of dover and canon rock but i know these are far too advanced for me, so my question is, can you recommend any songs that will get me started ? I dont want stupid songs like green day (though i really like green day) where you play the same thing over and over, i want a little bit of a challenge but not too hard.

Side Note : When i get better, what is a great sounding guitar ? Something that sounds really nice and professional but at a reasonal price ? I dont know much about guitars but gibsons les pauls seem to be popular but as i said, i havent a clue
Last edited by Anzath at May 27, 2008,
#3
Can you play any songs right now? Learn open chords/ pentatonic scales/ bar chords. The magic search bar can help you.
#4
well first of all good luck on ur quest to learn the guitar... secondly the kind of songs u want to learn depends upon ur musical tastes ...learn some simple yet cool songs like nutshell by alice in chains or nothing else matters by metallica (the chords...u can progress to play the solo when u get better at it) ...gibsons r pretty good but also ridiculously costly ...
#5
Wow the guy in against me is an awful singer lol..


Nope cant play a thing
#6
ac/dc and metallica riffs are usually pretty easy to learn. some led zeppelin stuff is pretty easy too ( rock and roll ). as general advice to learning the guitar make sure your practicing correctly! and you can find lots of information on how to do this online
#7
First of all, you need to learn your chords. Then you can learn how to play: "Highway to Hell", "Wild Thing", and "Hey Joe".
#8
Quote by Anzath
Well i have decided to learn guitar, have been wanting to for a while but never got round to it. I have a crappy squier but its better than nothing and it will do for learning

I want to play song like cliffs of dover and canon rock but i know these are far too advanced for me, so my question is, can you recommend any songs that will get me started ? I dont want stupid songs like green day (though i really like green day) where you play the same thing over and over, i want a little bit of a challenge but not too hard.

Side Note : When i get better, what is a great sounding guitar ? Something that sounds really nice and professional but at a reasonal price ? I dont know much about guitars but gibsons les pauls seem to be popular but as i said, i havent a clue


I could be a Di** and sugest "The art of shredding by pantera" but I'm not gonna. Alice in chains songs are good beginner songs. Some nirvana not smells like teen spirit everyone know that one. Uh learn some chords and most acoustic songs become accesible. A good guitar is the Les paul but some can be pricey and you don't want that. Lesser named brands are good beginner guitars who knows you might fall in love with a cheap pawn shop special like i did. Uh what else Oh and if you start feeling stuck some where learn a new progression or chord pattern or scale.
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#9
Here's a couple of cut/pastes of posts I made in similar threads, they should come in handy.

Start out with getting to grips with the guitar and learning some simple chords. Your first short-term goal is to be able to play through a few simple strummy songs - Beatles stuff is good, so is Creedence Clearwater Revival and *shudder* Oasis. Once you can do that you need to add barre chords to your arsenal, these will help in 2 ways - you'll be able to move open chords around and it'll also get you used to moving around the fretboard. It also forces you to start learning the notes on the fretboard, at the very least the bottom 2 strings.

From there you can start looking to learn more complex stuff, again don't go jumping into modern metal, learn some classic rock stuff. A lot of those songs are realtively simply constructed but they're also extremely well written, catchy and easy to remember...the better you know a song the easier it will be to play. That'll also introduce you to some simple riff-based lead work so listen to some AC/DC, Cream, Deep Purple, Black Sabbath, Aerosmith, Free, Whitesnake, Led Zeppelin, Lynyrd Skynyrd etc...

As things are getting more complex you also want to give yourself a bit more understanding of what's going on so take the time out to learn the notes on the whole fretboard and also learn the major scale and it's intervals - you don't need to really worry about memorising the scale over the whole fretboard yet. Technique wise you're also probably ready to try some solo stuff, so work on getting your picking clean and accurate and also learn basics like bending, hammer ons and pull offs. Also, listen to some blues and old rock'n roll - the 12 bar blues progression is probably the easiest, most rewarding thing to improvise over. Introduce yourself to the minor pentatonic scale and try to spot it being used when you're learning solo tabs.

For a first solo you don't want anything too hard or fast, but at the same time not too easy either - one of the best solos for learning first is Highway to Hell by AC/DC. It's quite short, but there's enough going on for it to sound interesting and it's a good workout for a number of techniques.

Notice I haven't once mentioned anything about getting faster...that's because it doesn't matter. You can't really "try" to get faster at playing, if you do you just end up playing messilly, the important things to work on are playing accurately and cleanly...if you do that then you gradually develop speed over time.




Master the basics, then work on gradually improving your ability level giving yourself realistic short-term goals.

Here's a VERY rough guide as to what's a feasible time frame to aim for. ~I'm only going to list a couple of songs for each "checkpoint" as it were, but you'd learn a lot more than that. I'd say you'd want to know at the very least 10 or so songs of around the same pace and style before moving on.

0 months - absolute basics
holding the guitar, tuning, knowing what the different bits do, learning to play a couple of chords cleanly, strumming,
|
v
1 month, simple chords, no solos eg:
Mull of Kintyre, Bad Moon Rising, Every Rose Has Its Thorn, Knocking on Heaven's Door.
|
v
4 months, fiddlier chord songs, no solos yet eg:
Highway to Hell, Smoke on the Water, All Right Now, Summer of 69, Teen Spirit
|
v
8 months, less chords, more riffs, go back and learn the solos you missed before try the ones in newer songs eg:
Iron Man, Shout at the Devil, Number of the Beast, Enter Sandman, Sweet Child
|
v
10 months faster songs eg:
Basket Case, Seek and Destroy, Battery, Crazy Train
|
v
12 months onwards and you should be able to gauge the difficulty of most things and work out realistic goals for yourself.
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Last edited by steven seagull at May 27, 2008,
#10
Try learning the solo (and intro) from Sweet Child O Mine - Guns N Roses.
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#11
I'm not much further ahead myself. I first learned the guitar as a teen, 30 years ago, but stopped playing from my mid-20's until about 6 months ago. So I feel like a newbie but I do have some experience that may help you get where you want to go.

Practise is the key to any skill and playing the guitar is just that. For most practising as a newbie I would recommend using an unplugged steel-string acoustic guitar as it helps hone your skills alot better than an electric. Why? Well the action on a good quality electric is usually lower than an acoustic and the strings are often alot lighter so your fingers don't get half the exercise they need to lay down the killer chops. I shelled out £350 ($700) for an acoustic but I reckon half that would get a good guitar for practising on. Yamaha make some of the best value acoustics.

As with any instrument quality comes at a price though as as already been said Gibson LP's are expensive. I play a Fender American Strat HSS, which cost around £700 ($1400) and with a Humbucker at the bridge and 2 single coil p/u's I can approach the sort of tone found in an Les Paul. Traditionally, Humbuckers are the best for heavier/harder rock whereas single coils are best for bluesier stuff. Compare Slash, Led Zep & AC/DC to Clapton, Eric Johnson & Pink Floyd and you'll get the drift. You will also need a decent combo and these are more expensive than the guitars. Try to buy a valve/tube amp - say 20 to 40 watts (thats loud enough for a small Hall/Pub venue). They are more expensive than transistor amps but they have better tone and the low powered combos (under 50 watts)are suitable for every style of music, save thrash/speed metal. Ideally, the amp should have a good 'Clean' channel and a separate 'Overdrive' channel. Use a few stomp boxes to get the effects you want. Check out the Boss website, the Effects pedals samples are awesome.

Learn simple open chords first, learn basic scales Major, Minor and Pentatonic variations (essential for rock). Practice them up and down the fretboard. It seems almost all the famous riffs and solos use the Pentatonic scales. BTW Pentatonics are simply scales with 5 notes rather than the 7 found in the Major scales. It can take 2-3 months to put 3 simple chords together in some sort of smooth progression. That is what you are aiming for - smooth chord progressions.

Start very slowly, less than 50-60 bpm. Make a chord change on every 4th beat, then every 3rd, then every 2nd, and so on as you get better. Once you get the chord changes down pat you will begin to speed up naturally. Don't try to force it. Also you will introduce new chords as you get better at the simpler ones.

I first started practising the Open Major chords and then introduced the Open Minors, and then Major & Minor 7ths, and a few Barre chords, as my fingers strengthened up. I have always practised scales though not as much as I should.

After re-learning for the last 6 months I'm still not able to play a complicated song but I can string chords together and it sounds ok. I have even been playing around with different tunings - particularly Dropped D, favoured by Bob Dylan & Joni Mitchell - it makes my acoustic sound incredible.

Hope that helps a little.
#12
One important thing.

PLAY STUFF YOU LIKE.

The main reason for this is it gives you more motivation than playing a song you've never heard before. When you're starting out, thinking 'I want to play this song' is a lot better than thinking ' i want to play guitar'. Simply because playing a song you don't know, or exercises can become too much like hard work. Learn a song you can play over and over and enjoy. Thus you'll play guitar more. Thus you'll beomce better. Thus.
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