#1
How do you apply your major/minor/pentatonic scales to different keys?
Do you play F ionian, G dorian, A phrygian, Bb lydian, C mixolydian
D aeolian, In the key of F? Is this how it works?
#5
Heres how I use scales.

I will play something and it will not sound good.
I will change it untill it does sound good. I look at what I am playng and think "Oh-thats a F dorian..."

I will tell the guys I am playing with "I am playing an F dorian-ish part around here...." what else works with that?

The other guys says "Lets play E-ionaina, then go into that part, then back in E-ionaian, then light our guitars on fire then sacrifice a virgin..."

Our legend grows.

That s how I use scales.
#6
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ya

no

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How do you apply your major/minor/pentatonic scales to different keys?
Do you play F ionian, G dorian, A phrygian, Bb lydian, C mixolydian
D aeolian, In the key of F? Is this how it works?


If you're over a chord progression that resolves to F major then you would use the F major scale to solo with. You can't use the other ones as they're the same notes and would therefore sound exactly the same.

Modes only come into play when you're playing modal music, using the specific pattern of intervals that are characteristic of a particular mode over relatively a static tonal centre. In other words, if you've got a complex (more than 2!) chord progression then there'll be an overall tonality that takes precedence over the individual chords and you choose your scale on that basis. However, if you have a static backing of Am and played the notes of the F major scale you'd actually be playing in A phrygian. The backing is what defines the scale you're playing in, not some arbitrary name.

If you look into this deeper you'll realise that many scales contain exactly the same notes, which is why you should alwayd learn scales as notes as opposed to patterns - it stops you learning the same thing several times over. Also remember that scales are continuous, the scale exists anywhere it's notes occur so C major on the guitar is actually something like.

E F G A B C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C D E F G A B

We're so attuned to the major scale in western music that without any accompaniment that's going to pull towards to C tonally, and if we play it over a chord progression that also resolves to C it's going to pull even stronger. It doesn't matter where you start playing, it's always C major.

If we change that to a static chord of a different tonal centre though that forces a different tonality. If we pick Em, for example, it's still the same notes but the "pull" is now towards E - the notes perform different functions withing the scale and therefore everything feels different. In this case we'd be playing in E phrygian.

E F G A B C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C D E F G A B

It's still exactly the same notes, it's just that the emphasis has changed, by forcing a change in the tonal centre you change the scale - again it doesn't matter where you start, if you play those notes over Em then it's E phrygian. The combination of the notes AND the underlying chord is what matters, if there's no backing then technically the mode can't exist.
Actually called Mark!

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#7
If you're in the key of F major, play F major. Modes have nothing to do with this, and you should ignore them completely until you have a firm grasp on the theory behind the major scale.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
If you're in the key of F major, play F major. Modes have nothing to do with this, and you should ignore them completely until you have a firm grasp on the theory behind the major scale.


+1

most people follow the temptation to jump into modes and other scales with long impressive sounding names far to early.

build your "castle" on a solid foundation, rather than out of sand. (Castle being metaphoric for your musical knowledge)
#9
Ya!!!!
I wouldn't totally ignore them
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_mode


I wrote this exactly the way people say.
it worked for me...it harmonize nice to
you just gatta phrase it.
http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/Ordinary/music/all/play307182

i do get it the other way too...if you listen closely to the bridge
there's a guitar track floating in the background just doing the dorian
over the entire bride part.
Last edited by Ordinary at May 27, 2008,