#1
Hate this book and i have a an english report due tomorrow on what laughter represents in the story. Yeah, I have no idea, anyone wanna help.
#2
Sparknotes.

Use it.
Quote by Teh Forest King
A kid took a fetal pig during pig dissection, put a napkin on it as a cape, wrote "super pig" on it, then threw it out the window onto the greenhouse below, yelling "super pig, blast off!". He failed the pig lab
#4
Why do you hate it?

Hate leads to suffering.
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You're just another brick in the wall
#5
Saw the movie. That's some twisted stuff right there.

Quote by Just Andrew
Sparknotes.

Use it.

This.
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#8
Quote by En_zed
Why do you hate it?

Hate leads to suffering.


He hates it because of fear of learning... and that led to anger that he's a dumbass... and that anger led him to the hate.
#11
Lord of the Flies is a fantastic book, but it's been a while since I've read it.

I suppose you could say in the beginning of the novel, the laughter has connotations of child-like excitement and the happy naivity that comes with adventure at such an age. For example, during the first "tribe" meeting where they can't get the "little-uns" to settle down. This shows the exhuberence of youth, which is one of the predominant themes in the early chapters of the novel.
However, later in the novel this metaphor juxtaposes into representing something quite the opposite. Laughter goes on to have connotations of sadistic satisfaction into the malevolent tribe's actions. For example, the tribes' behaviour after they kill Piggy. This shows the contrasting persona regarding the characters and the tribes from the beginning of the novel to their state of minds at the end.
This transformation is the main point of the poem as it magnifies the erratic changes in human behaviour when confined to a dystopian environment, especially one so unconventional from others as the environment itself is not an intentionally oppressive environment as such, in comparison to others such as those seen in novels such as 1984.
Ultimately, laughter can show how people change over time and their different meanings and intentions for identical characteristics, namely by the contrast of the innocence of laughter at the beginning of the novel to the evil of it at the end.

Sorry for being lousy but it's 1am and I'm tired. Sorry if this is useless. Give the book a chance and you'll love it.
#12
Quote by stringmagician
It represents insanity


That book was amazing, you're either illiterate, or a moron.


Indeed it is. I've almost finished reading it again (only read it once during GCSEs)
#13
Sparknote it... hurry up!
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#14
yeah i didn't dislike it until the end when the army dude acts like the British are better than everyone. And also I didn't really hate the book itself, I hated that the message it gave was diturbingly true to what humanity is like. I know i said i hated the book earlier, but thats just cuz i was mad that my teacher assigned an 1000 word essay and made it due the next day.
Last edited by dubstar92 at May 27, 2008,
#15
Reminds me of my GCSE english. Those are some bad memories there.
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#16
Quote by jmilli2
He hates it because of fear of learning... and that led to anger that he's a dumbass... and that anger led him to the hate.


And that hate led him to the Dark Side.
#17
Great text. Studied it in my GCSE last year but had read it before then.

There are a lot of quality essay points in the novel; laughter being an ironicaly laughable excuse. Mostly the laughter is either born out of nerves (ie. When Simon is killed, I believe. Been a while) or when insulting each other (usually piggy).

That is a really horrible thing to be asked to essay on, when there's so much more in the novel you could write about.
#18
Been doing some work and I've come to the conclusion that It kind like takes people's voices or silences them. does that sound rite?
#19
Quote by SealCubMassacre
Lord of the Flies is a fantastic book, but it's been a while since I've read it.

I suppose you could say in the beginning of the novel, the laughter has connotations of child-like excitement and the happy naivity that comes with adventure at such an age. For example, during the first "tribe" meeting where they can't get the "little-uns" to settle down. This shows the exhuberence of youth, which is one of the predominant themes in the early chapters of the novel.
However, later in the novel this metaphor juxtaposes into representing something quite the opposite. Laughter goes on to have connotations of sadistic satisfaction into the malevolent tribe's actions. For example, the tribes' behaviour after they kill Piggy. This shows the contrasting persona regarding the characters and the tribes from the beginning of the novel to their state of minds at the end.
This transformation is the main point of the poem as it magnifies the erratic changes in human behaviour when confined to a dystopian environment, especially one so unconventional from others as the environment itself is not an intentionally oppressive environment as such, in comparison to others such as those seen in novels such as 1984.
Ultimately, laughter can show how people change over time and their different meanings and intentions for identical characteristics, namely by the contrast of the innocence of laughter at the beginning of the novel to the evil of it at the end.

Sorry for being lousy but it's 1am and I'm tired. Sorry if this is useless. Give the book a chance and you'll love it.



Plagerize this.