#1
And after getting done with the "Chord Progessions" section, I have questions.

In the book, it has a chart of all of the common chords you can use in each key. It only shows major progressions though, and I would want to mostly write in a minor key (most likely D minor, C# minor, or C minor). Take C for example. Using the common chords, you could use C, D min, E min, F, G, A min, & B diminished. Do the common chords change if I want to write in a minor key?

Also, I would be taking this stuff and turning it into metal and metalcore kind of stuff (Harmonized riffs in minor scales, pedal tones and such) but how do I take this part of theory into my playing in metal? Should I use the same concept with power chords?

Thank you so much for anyone that replies!
#2
I don't know about the metal thing, but chords are formed off the scale degrees, whether major or minor.
Scale of D Minor (natural): D E F G A Bb C
D Minor
E Minor
F Major (Relative key)
G Minor (Subdominant)
A 7 (Dominant 7th)
Bb Major
C Major

I hope that helps, sorry if I didn't understand the question lol.

EDIT: If you understand this, don't be afraid to go outside the box. It's the out-of-scale chords that make your songs sound unique, just experiment.
#3
C is enharmonic to Am, so i asume that's what you mean. If i'm right, then yes, all of those chords would work w/in your song or songs. Just messing around w/ chord changes can give you awesome results. and don't just limit yourself to the chords of the key. most metal uses a lot of chromatics for passing notes. so say you wanted to go from Dmin to Emin. What's stopping you from putting a passing Db in there? it all just depends on the context of the song and the sound that you want to make. experiment!
#4
Well that's also what I've been doing,
I know that I can do whatever the hell I want as log as it sounds good, but i don't want to have such a random path with it. Thanks for telling me about the relative minors, I had forgotten about that.

Now for the metal issue.
#6
Quote by ixcokerxi
Well that's also what I've been doing,
I know that I can do whatever the hell I want as log as it sounds good, but i don't want to have such a random path with it. Thanks for telling me about the relative minors, I had forgotten about that.

Now for the metal issue.

There's nothing wrong with it, as long as you are aware of what you are doing it and why you are doing it: Not just because it "sounds good", maybe you're taking an out-of-scale note to resolve to another chord for a greater effect. When I started writing something, I experimented with a bunch of chords: augmented, suspended, 9, ect. And they all sound good, at least to my ears. Then again it's more of a classical-romantic piece. But don't be afraid is the point I'm trying to make, as long as you are aware of what you're doing.
#7
I have that book. It's pretty good. To answer your question, a minor chord progression would be the same as the major one, but starting at the sixth degree. Instead of:

M m m M M m dim
I ii iii IV V vi vii(dim)

It would be

m dim M m m M M
i ii(dim) III iv v VI VII

ya know?

-g13
#8
Quote by gothikchile13
I have that book. It's pretty good. To answer your question, a minor chord progression would be the same as the major one, but starting at the sixth degree. Instead of:

M m m M M m dim
I ii iii IV V vi vii(dim)

It would be

m dim M m m M M
i ii(dim) III iv v VI VII

ya know?

-g13


That's an easy, simple way to put it.
#10
^and way oversimplified
Quote by gothikchile13
I have that book. It's pretty good. To answer your question, a minor chord progression would be the same as the major one, but starting at the sixth degree. Instead of:

M m m M M m dim
I ii iii IV V vi vii(dim)

It would be

m dim M m m M M
i ii(dim) III iv v VI VII

ya know?

-g13
Not really, minor progressions usually have a major fifth degree chord (or dominant chord, whatever). And I like to make the fourth degree a minor sixth chord. And I usually make the second degree just minor and not diminished.

And you usually have a choice between having a flat seventh degree (which has a very week resolve) or a natural seventh (strong resolve to the root). But this means you can either have a diminished chord built on the natural seventh degree or a major chord built of the minor seventh degree.

And to T/S, the only real common chord changes in modern music are going to and from fifth and fourth degree chords. People are just too used to listening to pop music.
If you want to know about common chord changes in progressive metal or classical (not romantic classical though, that stuffs way ahead of me) or jazz I can continue?