#1
Ok now, I've been playing for 2 years now, without any profesional help. And now I'm digging the Modes of the Diatonic a lot. I got nothing on many of you guys on guitar, so I need your help!

I tend to approach my playing depending on patterns I see... Now, the Diatonic has 2 half-tone intervals- as in like, the Phrygian/Dorian notes and the Locrian/Major notes (hope u'r still with me).

Now I look at the Diatonic using these half-tone intervals as reference points in soloing. That way my Dorian is seperated, and so is my Mixo and Minor. My brother thinks its very weird, just want to know what you guys think? Anyone ever tried that or something similar? or What are your thoughts on this way of approaching?
#3
well man, if it works for you...

Quote by zeppelinfreak51


And just to get it out of the way, scales are a collection of notes, not a pattern on a fretboard.


actually a scale is a set of intervals.
make Industrial and/or experimental electronic music? Join my group!

Last.fm
#4
I think I understand what you're saying, when I play, sometimes I rapidly switch modes while playing, but modes are determined by the flats and sharps collected in the scale, there are different patterns on the fretboard in which you can play a diatonic sequence.
Man... Signatures are hard to come up with!
#7
Well, I'm just getting into modes and I don't have a whole lotta playing under my belt either so yea.. I'm tryin! lol

Quote by zeppelinfreak51
...what?

And just to get it out of the way, scales are a collection of notes, not a pattern on a fretboard.


Scales are a collection of notes IN A PATTERN. And if they weren't in a pattern, wouldn't they be jibberish?
#8
Quote by MonsterOfRock


Scales are a collection of notes IN A PATTERN. And if they weren't in a pattern, wouldn't they be jibberish?


You can play the notes of a scale in any pattern you want for the melody, the intervals are important for figuring what chords to use within the scale and what the tonal center and overall feel of the piece is,
make Industrial and/or experimental electronic music? Join my group!

Last.fm
#9
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
You can play the notes of a scale in any pattern you want for the melody, the intervals are important for figuring what chords to use within the scale and what the tonal center and overall feel of the piece is,


Lol, by 'pattern', I was reffering to the pattern created by intervals like "W-W-H-W-W-W-H"- for major. Take one one from the front and add it to the back and you get all the modes, typa-thing. So yea, I get ya.

(further note for whome may be confused: I never said the word "Fretboard") :P
#10
ahh yeah now what you said in the OP makes a lot more sense, but yeah, like I said before, if it works for you...
make Industrial and/or experimental electronic music? Join my group!

Last.fm
#11
...what? I really fail to see how this has anything to do with modal music.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by MonsterOfRock
Ok now, I've been playing for 2 years now, without any profesional help. And now I'm digging the Modes of the Diatonic a lot. I got nothing on many of you guys on guitar, so I need your help!

I tend to approach my playing depending on patterns I see... Now, the Diatonic has 2 half-tone intervals- as in like, the Phrygian/Dorian notes and the Locrian/Major notes (hope u'r still with me).

Now I look at the Diatonic using these half-tone intervals as reference points in soloing. That way my Dorian is seperated, and so is my Mixo and Minor. My brother thinks its very weird, just want to know what you guys think? Anyone ever tried that or something similar? or What are your thoughts on this way of approaching?



I think it might be a good idea to study "with professional help" for a while. take a class, study with a teacher. Once you have a grasp on the fundamental concepts, THEN start developing your own ideas .

Don't get me wrong. Getting a sense for the patterns is a good idea, but if you really want to understand what modes are and how to apply them, you could benefit from some guidance.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 28, 2008,
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
I think it might be a good idea to study "with professional help" for a while. take a class, study with a teacher. Once you have a grasp on the fundamental concepts, THEN start developing your own ideas .

Don't get me wrong. Getting a sense for the patterns is a good idea, but if you really want to understand what modes are and how to apply them, you could benefit from some guidance.


I see what you're saying, and I think getting help is a good idea in general. But it doesn't really work with me that way, lol. I don't like it becoming a chore. I AM Pro-Theory but I like being taught by myself (interesting nuances you pick up when you go about your own pace). And I'm not necessarily learning slower than pro-help (infact, faster at times), so yea...

Its like when you were like 12-13yrs old. You love sex by then, but dun wanna turn up to the Personal Development class in early school, haha, kiddin'!

BTW, I know how to build chords for modes, so far, so good with that. And I know how to make them sound (probably exp. Locrian, but getting there!)
Last edited by MonsterOfRock at May 28, 2008,
#14
yeah...that's the way i look at it sometimes... where the 1/2 steps are.

that's how I seperate the phrygian and locrain from the rest,
becuase of the b2.

I also put them into class or category. Min or min, This helps me seperate them.
The 3rd or b3rd distinguish this...I also remember that all min will have a b7.

The mixolian or dominate will have b7 also

Maj penta and minor penta are the basic layer. Adding two note back....
these are the notes that will create the 1/2 steps.
The ionian and aerolian become the next basic layer.

Altering the ionian
To get a mixolian..I simply shift the 1/2 step toward the 6th note by playing
a b7.
To get the lydian I simple shift the 1/2 step towards the 5th by playing a #4

Altering the aerolian
To get the dorian , shift the 1/2 step towards the b7 by playing a maj6 or natural 6
To get the phrygian, shift the 1/2 step towards the root by playing b2

The locrain is just a phrygian with a b5...bascailly shifting the 1/2 step towards
the 4th

The easist way for me to play a dim chord is to just play a min chord
then just make the 5th flat.

take your basic B min bar chord.

-------2----------------------
-------x---3-----------------
-------x--------4------------
-------x--------4------------
-------2---------------------
------------------------------

shift the 5th and make it flat

-----x-----------------------
-----x----3-----------------
-----x--------4-------------
-----x----3-----------------
-----2----------------------
----------------------------
Last edited by Ordinary at May 28, 2008,
#16
Okay, I'm going to throw out what I believe to be a good definition of scales that I just thought up, maybe this will bring an end to the "what a scale is" argument.

A scale is a pattern of notes that lie at specific intervals from a defined tonal center.
#17
scales are slimmy thingie on fishies...or a dried up old hag.

if you where the dried up old hag...maybe you might choose
something in minor to express that.lol

if you where a snake..maybe something mystical and evilish.. locrian or phrygian
#19
Write down your idea with as much detail as possible, then forget about it for a while as you learn standard conventions of theory. Come back to it later and see if it works.