#1
Thank you all for help.
Some more then others.
I do belive this is correct though


Last edited by Deffmetal666 at May 28, 2008,
#3
Quote by therealtater
wtf? I've never seen anything like that before

All 7 scales work off of eachother around the fret board
And im sorry about the size of picture .

I didnt expect it to come out that big.
#4
Yeah I've never seen anything like it either =/
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Amps:
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#5
Quote by kylendm
Yeah I've never seen anything like it either =/


Im going to redo the images with the keys on them
#6
I think you're supposed to look at the red tiles
They're just the modes (with some redundant notes)
Last edited by qstionauthority at May 28, 2008,
#7
Theyre all just different shapes of the major/minor scale,

or we could declare them as modes, assuming the root is the first note on each diagram:

1st is another Major scale (ionian)
2nd is dorian
3rd is phrygian
4th is lydian,
5th is mixolydian
#8
Quote by NewShred
Theyre all just different shapes of the major/minor scale,

or we could declare them as modes, assuming the root is the first note on each diagram:

1st is another Major scale (ionian)
2nd is dorian
3rd is phrygian
4th is lydian,
5th is mixolydian


Thanks Man
I got the names mixed up.
#10
I think its sideways. From left to right would be like tab from bottom to top. The red squares are the frets you play.

Looking at it that way, it appears to be modes. Ignore the circle for the root note, and just use the starting note as the root. It looks like it goes Aeolian, Locrian, Ionian, Dorian, etc
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#11
Quote by Ackj
I think its sideways. From left to right would be like tab from bottom to top. The red squares are the frets you play.

Looking at it that way, it appears to be modes. Ignore the circle for the root note, and just use the starting note as the root. It looks like it goes Aeolian, Locrian, Ionian, Dorian, etc

Dude
I drew them myself.
Trust me they arent sideways.

PS
Im reposting pictures with the correct once i fix this.
#12
It's all the same scale. Modes aren't shapes, and you aren't ready to be worrying about modes yet.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
Quote by Archeo Avis
It's all the same scale. Modes aren't shapes, and you aren't ready to be worrying about modes yet.
Why do you say that?
#14
Quote by Deffmetal666
Why do you say that?

Because the harmonic context determines the mode; if you play any of those "modes" in C major over a static C chord, you're playing C Ionian regardless of the note you start on. You can't just think of modes as shapes, you need to understand the theory behind diatonic harmony first.
#15
yeah it make sense when looking at a poster chord charts.

but can you rotate it 90 degree counter clockwise.

without a root it can be whatever.

okay..maybe like this or this is how it'll fit together
the 3rd diagram down or the first one without the root
in the key of C.

it starts on the 8th fret
next...9th
then ... 12th fret or open
then .... first fret
then ....3rd fret
Last edited by Ordinary at May 28, 2008,
#16
Quote by :-D
Because the harmonic context determines the mode; if you play any of those "modes" in C major over a static C chord, you're playing C Ionian regardless of the note you start on. You can't just think of modes as shapes, you need to understand the theory behind diatonic harmony first.


I wasnt the one posting that it looked like shapes.
I understand the way harmony works.
I drew these all myself by the way.
I just forgot the names of the Modes in the Major / minor scale.
#17
Quote by Deffmetal666
I wasnt the one posting that it looked like shapes.
I understand the way harmony works.
I drew these all myself by the way.
I just forgot the names of the Modes in the Major / minor scale.

You didn't specify a question in the OP, so I figured that's what you were asking. Do you actually understand the "harmonic context" bit though? Many people think they do and don't at all.
#18
okay...there's only a 1/2 step between the E and F.

on the new chart you put up..you might wanna correct that
#19
Quote by Ordinary
okay...there's only a 1/2 step between the E and F.

on the new chart you put up..you might wanna correct that

No i didnt.
Check again closely.
The text i chose to use is quite unuser friendly and i am sorry for that.

E sharp is a note

The only part in which there is not a note on the guitar is the B sharp and The F sharp.
Hence why the BC and FG are like they are.
#20
Quote by Deffmetal666
The only part in which there is not a note on the guitar is the B sharp and The F sharp.
Hence why the BC and FG are like they are.

I'll assume you mean F flat, but they still certainly exist on the guitar. If you play an Eb Phrygian scale on guitar, for example, you're playing an Fb as your second note.
#21
yeah it makesense..if there's # signs for those notes.
If you where looking at it as the key of G

but it might confuse a lot of people.
#22
Seems like a lot of wasted effort to me - all you did was draw the C major scale 7 times
Actually called Mark!

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#23
Quote by :-D
You didn't specify a question in the OP, so I figured that's what you were asking. Do you actually understand the "harmonic context" bit though? Many people think they do and don't at all.


Correct me if I am wrong but it is pretty simply going up the non-flat and non-sharp notes and keys. Thats the major scale.
It works with a basic (freting)2,2,1,2,2,2,1........ order because of the lack of a B sharp and F sharp.
In E standard :
EFGABCD...and then keeps repeating itself.
The different modes are from which note the scale is off of.
AKA the Root Note.
Although this is true every mode works together to form the Major scale.
E is Aeolian
F is Locrian
G is Ionian
A is Dorian
B is Phrygrian
C is Lydian
D is Mexolydian

Am i Correct or am i slightly off base?
#24
you're not wrong..maybe if you use a different color to designate the root
it might be easier to figure out.

This way you won't need letters or # sings
#25
Quote by Ordinary
you're not wrong..maybe if you use a different color to designate the root
it might be easier to figure out.

This way you won't need letters.

Ok then thank you for the idea.
Im making a youtube video dedicated to my old Western Civilaization teacher.
After class we would often discuss guitar and musical theory. THIS is the thing we discussed most. in the video i will use different colors for the roots.
#26
Quote by :-D
I'll assume you mean F flat, but they still certainly exist on the guitar. If you play an Eb Phrygian scale on guitar, for example, you're playing an Fb as your second note.


No I ment F sharp
#27
Quote by Deffmetal666
Correct me if I am wrong but it is pretty simply going up the non-flat and non-sharp notes and keys. Thats the major scale.
It works with a basic (freting)2,2,1,2,2,2,1........ order because of the lack of a B sharp and F sharp.
In E standard :
EFGABCD...and then keeps repeating itself.
The different modes are from which note the scale is off of.
AKA the Root Note.
Although this is true every mode works together to form the Major scale.
E is Aeolian
F is Locrian
G is Ionian
A is Dorian
B is Phrygrian
C is Lydian
D is Mexolydian

Am i Correct or am i slightly off base?

Are you saying that EFGABCD is the E major scale? I'm not understanding what you're asking. And remember that to be playing in a specific mode, it's not just the root; again, the harmonic context is more important.