#1
What are some excercises that would help gain some speed in soloing. I'm currently just playing scales with a metronome and trying to work them faster and faster. I'm currently going at 180 bpm comfortably and can hit 200 but its somewhat slopy. But this is a long a boring process.

Are there any excersises that yall use that help build speed?

if you would post a tab of it too, that would be nice
#2
scales are the best thing i say for speed. throw in a little aternate picking and keep on working on that and u should gain sum speed
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#4
Practice your scales on acoustic. Once you switch over to electric your notes will be clearer, trust me.
#5
Ask yourself, is there any practical benefit to being able to play scales at high speed? It's boring for you and it's doubly boring for anyone listening to you...instead of mindlessly chasing speed for speeds sake practice stuff that you can actually use in your playing.

If you practice scales then you get good at scales, that's not the same as getting good at playing the guitar.
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#6
also, speed is not an advanced technique. It get's a bit irritating as a guitarist who has been playing for awhile to hear people say "he plays so fast" and stuff like that. Its basics.
#7
Quote by silentdud
Practice your scales on acoustic. Once you switch over to electric your notes will be clearer, trust me.


+1

So true, its harder to hit clean and dynamically similar notes on an acoustic or even on a clean guitar tone. Speed comes with time and patience anyway, it is a bi-product of accurate technique, which has to practiced rigorously.
#8
Quote by silentdud
Practice your scales on acoustic. Once you switch over to electric your notes will be clearer, trust me.


Forsure, or if you don't have an acoustic, just practice on a clean channel, distortion is way too forgiving. Once you can do it on clean, the distortion is so much more solid.
#9
Quote by TyFood
Forsure, or if you don't have an acoustic, just practice on a clean channel, distortion is way too forgiving. Once you can do it on clean, the distortion is so much more solid.


That's the best way to explain it. Perfect it on a clean channel, and it'll sound incredible with distortion overlapping.
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"Speed is the consequence of good technique."
#10
Speed is the consequence of good technique.

If you have the perfect technique for picking an arpeggio at 120bpm, it would be easier to increase the speed up to 160bpm, but if your technique is sloppy then you can't do this.

Practice rather on an acoustic guitar or in a clean channel slowly and then at the speed desired (or near it). Then try this with distortion slowly and go up. Really I had problems with speed because I'm kind of a slow hand guitarist, but the practice and analysis of a same pattern leads to speed. I actually can play some things faster than my shredder friends that just practice chromatics all day. Its aiming perfect technique on what you want to play.
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#11
hey, i've got a question related to speed, etc. but it's about legato. I've been doing a lot of left hand work lately, and as I've delved into legato, I've been realizing more and more that my hands are very small (I'm a girl), so it's hard to play riffs that are all over the place such as the one's Freepower posted in his second lesson

Is there any help I can get for this issue? It's kinda a big deal to my playing
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#12
Quote by Jix_Jax
hey, i've got a question related to speed, etc. but it's about legato. I've been doing a lot of left hand work lately, and as I've delved into legato, I've been realizing more and more that my hands are very small (I'm a girl), so it's hard to play riffs that are all over the place such as the one's Freepower posted in his second lesson

Is there any help I can get for this issue? It's kinda a big deal to my playing


you could try a guitar with a smaller neck radius and a thinner neck (like a fender)

also just work on doing long stretches, you'd be surprised how much you can usually improve.
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Last edited by Kid_Thorazine at Jun 4, 2008,
#13
well, im in the process of buying a 'souped up' (I'm not even sure if that's what I'm to call it) Yamaha something or another, because it's said to have a smaller neck, and as far as stretching goes, I'm not too sure if I know any effective one.

edit:
also, as I am aware, 'smaller guitars' usually have a sort of compromised quality, where they don't play as well as full scaled guitars. Is this always true? or just mostly?
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Last edited by Jix_Jax at Jun 4, 2008,
#14
Quote by Jix_Jax


edit:
also, as I am aware, 'smaller guitars' usually have a sort of compromised quality, where they don't play as well as full scaled guitars. Is this always true? or just mostly?


Daisy Rock makes some really nice smaller guitars (the higher end ones, not the weird ones that look like flowers and crap) also Gibson makes some called the Goddess series that have smaller necks (same scale I think, but they use a fairly short scale anyway)
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#15
Quote by Pepefloydean
Speed is the consequence of good technique.


That's very profound, and incredibly truthful.

Don't worry about gaining speed, associate yourself with excellent technique. The slower more technical guitarist will be praised more than the faster, sloppier guitarist. Play the way that's most comfortable to you, if you play the song/riff with a slower BPM than the real song, then do that.

Slow and steady wins the race.
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#16
now when you say playing at 180-200 I must ask how you are sub-dividing the beet, like are you doing eighth notes, sixteenth notes or what?
#17
Quote by metal4eva_22
now when you say playing at 180-200 I must ask how you are sub-dividing the beet, like are you doing eighth notes, sixteenth notes or what?


The kind of "standard" subdivision for speed practicing is 16ths, but you'll see a lot of triplets and sextuplets too.
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#18
Quote by Jix_Jax
I've been realizing more and more that my hands are very small (I'm a girl), so it's hard to play riffs that are all over the place such as the one's Freepower posted in his second lesson

Is there any help I can get for this issue? It's kinda a big deal to my playing


Don't worry, it's not your natural hand size, it's practice and gentle stretching that'll increase your reach. A good idea is to start with an uncomfortable reach, and then move it up 12 frets and slowly (over about a week) come down to the original position, playing (or even not playing at all) very slowly!

Also, hand position is 90% of stretching, the reason I can make 10 fret stretches is because i have good posture, tbh, nothing more. Check out my 5th lesson in sig to see what I mean.