#1
ok so ive just been given an old steel string...its new to me so hence the new guitar part...anyway it needs new strings and a bit of a clean up...since i have always been electric i was just wondering how would i go about doing this and what are the differences between electric strings and steel strings

thanks guys
#3
are there huge differences in guages between electric and accustice...like im using a 9 on electric what should i be looking at for the accustic?
#4
The guage is the same, but the tension I think is stronger. Install a set of light guage or even extra light.
#5
ah ok...i was under the impression that accustics used thicker strings than an electric....is the string change going to be hard to do?
#6
No not hard at all. Some people like to change one at a time, they say its better on the neck. Just loosen one string at a time all the way, use something that's not going to scratch and pull out that pin at the bottom of the string. The string will slip right out. When you put the new one in, the pin acts like a wedge, slightly pull up on string while pushing pin with youre thumd till its firmliy set and leave about 2inches of slack and tune it up.
#7
Quote by eruption1988
ah ok...i was under the impression that accustics used thicker strings than an electric....is the string change going to be hard to do?


Your impression is correct. Lights for an acoustic start with a .012" gauge string for the high E. Lights for an electric start with a .009" high E.
So yes, all are thicker for an acoustic.
Changing strings on an acoustic isn't a big deal, but there a couple of things different. Namely the bridge.
Go here and you'll find everything you need to do the job properly.

This first one will help you with removing tight bridge pins.
http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/SteelStrings/PullPin/pullpin.html

And this link will help you with the rest.
http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/SteelStrings/Stringing/ststringing1.html
#8
Quote by tymatt67
The guage is the same, but the tension I think is stronger. Install a set of light guage or even extra light.


The gauge is not the same. Acoustic lights are 3 gauges heavier than electric lights.
Please be sure of your information before posting as all you are doing is steering a person new at guitaring in the wrong direction. Thank you.
#10
Quote by tymatt67
No not hard at all. Some people like to change one at a time, they say its better on the neck. Just loosen one string at a time all the way, use something that's not going to scratch and pull out that pin at the bottom of the string. The string will slip right out. When you put the new one in, the pin acts like a wedge, slightly pull up on string while pushing pin with youre thumd till its firmliy set and leave about 2inches of slack and tune it up.


2 inches of slack may be a bit much for the lowest two strings. you only need abour 2-3 winds on those lower strings which is closer to an inch to and inch and a half.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#12
thanks for the help guyys

and for the websites im in work atm had a quick look ill have a proper look when i get home but they look like they will be a great help

thanks once again
#13
errr... since you're restringing an acoustic and electric, you may have problems with putting the bridge pins in. here's a website that will help you.

http://frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/SteelStrings/Stringing/ststringing1.html
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#14
Didn't I already post that link up above? Just a sec, let me go look....(tick, tock, tick, tock)
Yea, I did. Weird huh?
#15
Quote by LeftyDave
Didn't I already post that link up above? Just a sec, let me go look....(tick, tock, tick, tock)
Yea, I did. Weird huh?


whoops, LOL. didnt look. my badd.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#16
Quote by LeftyDave
The gauge is not the same. Acoustic lights are 3 gauges heavier than electric lights.
Please be sure of your information before posting as all you are doing is steering a person new at guitaring in the wrong direction. Thank you.



so if im using 9s on electric do i want to be looking at 12s for this?
#17
You betcha. .012's are considered the "norm" for many acoustic guitars. They're an average gauge that will work well with the majority of setups on acoustics. They are also the most used size by guitar manufacturers.
A not overly expensive, yet quality set would be D'Addario EJ16's, which are phosphor bronze compsition, and are in lights, .012's. Elixer Nanoweb Phosphor Bronze are another. They last incredibly long and sound nice too, but are twice the price of the D'Addario's.
Martin Silk and Steels are another set that I've used and liked. I'd recommend these if heading into the recording studio as they hold their tune better than any other string I've tried to date. I had my acoustic stored away recently for almost 2 weeks(dang work anyway), and when I got it out to play, it was nearly dead on in tune, needing only a slight bump on the low E string to bring it up to pitch. The drawback to the Martins is that they don't last as long as the others, but they do sound good.
Just a few ideas for you.