#1
I've been using the following turnaround a lot when playing solos in the A Pentatonic Blues scale... but not all the notes of the turnaround are in that scale... is that still OK?

E --------5-------------4-------------3---------------------------------
B ------------------------------------------------------------------------
G ---5-------5----4--------4----3--------3-----2---------------------
D -------------------------------------------------------3----4----5---
A ------------------------------------------------------------------------
E ------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks for any help.
#2
i don't think it matters in what key you play. i think a turnaround is good on any blues scale
#4
you don't have to ever play in key or any of that, but usually it helps you sound better if you do, but as long as it sounds good just do it and don't worry about what key you're in.

Theory gives you a set of loose guidelines, not strict rules that must be adhered to at all times.
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#5
Quote by geetarmanic
I've been using the following turnaround a lot when playing solos in the A Pentatonic Blues scale... but not all the notes of the turnaround are in that scale... is that still OK?

E --------5-------------4-------------3---------------------------------
B ------------------------------------------------------------------------
G ---5-------5----4--------4----3--------3-----2---------------------
D -------------------------------------------------------3----4----5---
A ------------------------------------------------------------------------
E ------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks for any help.
That would be fine if the backing was thinish. What sort of backing is being played behind it?
#6
^ No backing track right now... i haven't tried playing over the top of anything just yet.
#7
the blues breaks tons of theory rules, and turnarounds are usually chromatic anyways, so don't worry about it.
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#8
Yeah, this type of turnaround uses a chromatic descent. That means that it uses the chromatic scales: all twelve notes. As long as you don't stay too long on a tone that really doesn't go with that "bluesy" kinda sound, as the flat second or the minor sixth (actually, they're really the only two intervals that don't sound bluesy), you should be fine. Anyways, basic blues "rule" is to play anything that sounds good. And nothing is really "OK" or prohibited - think of theory as a set of guidelines that can help you get what you want, but not as a rigid set of rules that you must abide by.
#9
A bit off topic.. sorry.

I thought that was just a regular blues scale...Because when I learned it, they called it just a "blues scale". Am I wrong?
The scale has 6 tones anyways, is it still called pentatonic?

Sorry for the confusion.
#10
Quote by one vision
A bit off topic.. sorry.

I thought that was just a regular blues scale...Because when I learned it, they called it just a "blues scale". Am I wrong?
The scale has 6 tones anyways, is it still called pentatonic?

Sorry for the confusion.
He's not using the A Blues scale. He's using chromaticism.

Yes, the A Blues scale contains a chromatic tone in Eb, but that's hardly enough to (prgamatically) qualify as a chromatic lick.

If a scale has 6 tones, it's not pentatonic; it's hexatonic.

I wouldn't consider the blues scale either. A hexatonic scale would be A B C D E G. The blues scale is a pentatonic scale with a chromatic passing tone.

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