#1
How do you play yours?

I've read about four methods.

1) Bend the string, then return it rapidly.
2) Push the string down into the fret to alter the pitch (this is really inefficient I hear).
3) For a more hectic one, slide between frets really fast.

Now, the fourth, which is actually supposed to be the first, and the most basic one, is where you slide your finger left and right on the string (between the fret to my knowledge). Now, maybe I'm doing it wrong, but this doesn't seem to make a vibrato, just keep the note the same pitch.

I slide my finger from the beginning of the fret to the end, is that what you're supposed to do? Or si there something else?

Thanks in advance.
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#2
The first method you named is the conventional one, the second works too, but as you said, ineffective. And the 4th one doesnt work because the frets mark the notes, nomatter where you put the finger in the fret, it's the same note.


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#3
Quote by Jens57
The first method you named is the conventional one, the second works too, but as you said, ineffective. And the 4th one doesnt work because the frets mark the notes, nomatter where you put the finger in the fret, it's the same note.


I figured as much, but I read that is the 'original' method, and the one most utilized, I guess I got lied to.
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#4
3) is not vibrato, its a trill. In tab you may see this symbol ~~~~ or something like that. In tab is means vibrato, but in every instance in regular sheet music, it means a trill, so that might be the source of confusion.

also the 4th method is commonly used by classical guitarists and orchestral instruments (cello, violin, etc) with no frets where its much easier to get changes in pitch by sliding a small amount. classical guitars have lower frets and flatter fretboards so its easier to pull it off. whatever one works for you is fine.
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#5
i love the third one =] greg howe does it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hBQt6OkGTvQ

The first one is the conventional method, learn to do it by using your wrist, and also using just your finger(s)
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#6
The fourth has been utilized very often by Allan Holdsworth due to the fact that he also plays the violin.
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#7
The 4th is vibrato as played on a classical guitar. The 1st is the way to do it for electric, although you can split that one up in finger, wrist and arm vibrato :P
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#8
actually the fourth method is one that's used very commonly. but you got one thing wrong. you dont slide the finger from one area to another on the same fret. you keep it in the same position and applying alternating pressure towards and away from the bridge without bending the string vertically. the advantage here is that you can raise as well as lower the pitch
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#9
5) tremolo?
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#10
Yeah, as others have said, the fourth one is classical vibrato. I use one from playing viola, but it's way more subtle on guitar than a conventional guitar vibrato.