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#1
Anyone know flamenco? Is there a site that I havnt found where it can teach you flamenco? I'd like to learn, youtube isnt good for flamenco, and I havnt found a site. All I know is what I listen to. Anyways I want to learn flamenco, so if someone knows how, please let me know.
EDIT: Although I want to learn, I dont want to be at all serious about it. I just want some fun.
Last edited by mepmep at May 31, 2008,
#2
theres a video lesson with rodrigo y gabriella on it (or something similar to flamenco, i don't know the subtle differences, but it's that kinda sound) on musicradar.com if thats any help.
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#4
there's good stuff on youtube but you have to search for the certain styles and you'll have to read up a bit on them beforehand.

sevillanas
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sevillanas+lesson&search_type=

this guy is good too, try his links

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94XlOv_IQ0M&feature=related

just look at what they're doing and ignore the spanish if you can't speak it.

also search for gerhard graf martinez he has the movies wich accompany his books on youtube too

edit: ^ and I'd be carefull what you say about books and flamenco, it's a dire subject.
since flamenco isn't supposed to be written down on paper but transfered orally from teacher to student most afficionados (and epsecially the purists) frown on it.
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
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Last edited by FretboardToAsh at May 29, 2008,
#6
Hah...you think you can learn flamenco off tabs and youtube videos? Try years and years of practice, study and dedication
#7
Flamenco is just finger picking and general concepts mostly. There are a few good video's out there on it that might be worth watching, just look on amazon. There is a large concern for modal theory in flamenco, so if you don't know your ****, learn it.
#9
Quote by slayer1516
Hah...you think you can learn flamenco off tabs and youtube videos? Try years and years of practice, study and dedication

Im not looking for formal instruction, just the general knowhow techniques. I know its orally taught and not written down. Im not trying to expertise in it in a day. I just want to learn it, cause it would be cool.
#10
Quote by mepmep
Im not looking for formal instruction, just the general knowhow techniques. I know its orally taught and not written down. Im not trying to expertise in it in a day. I just want to learn it, cause it would be cool.

You're going to want formal instruction and probably need it. Find a classical guitar teacher first, get the basic techniques down well, and then find a specific instructor for flamenco. It's not something you can easily go about learning by yourself.
#11
Quote by silentdud
allot of flamenco players really don't have formal training really. It's all by ear and by... i guess in our day and age... youtube. I learned how to play guitar by watching peoples hands on videos.


You're really wrong. Flamenco on the guitar is a high performance art, like other classical music on the violin or piano, and you need to be classically trained and dedicate probably your life to the playing of it to actually learn it - not just poorly imitate it.

Also, I might get some flak for saying this, but you probably don't need to know theory that much. If you're playing from sheet music then you don't need theory at all, but if you want to interpret pieces to the best of your ability then you should learn what's going on so you can bring out all the voicings and harmonies as the composer intended.
#13
Quote by Shackman10
You're really wrong. Flamenco on the guitar is a high performance art, like other classical music on the violin or piano, and you need to be classically trained and dedicate probably your life to the playing of it to actually learn it - not just poorly imitate it.

Also, I might get some flak for saying this, but you probably don't need to know theory that much. If you're playing from sheet music then you don't need theory at all, but if you want to interpret pieces to the best of your ability then you should learn what's going on so you can bring out all the voicings and harmonies as the composer intended.


I'm by no means wanting to become a serious flamenco player, I just want to have fun playing something different that I really like the sound of. Im not looking to play sheat music, cause I hate playing covers in any style. I write my own songs by listening to what I hear. Any ways, Id really like to be able to play some flamenco, so direct me to any good sites or videos please.
#14
You can "play a cover" (if that's what you call playing something like Bach) and put more feeling into it than you ever would playing your own song. There are lots of ways to interpret a piece and make it your own - and it can be even more rewarding to the performer than to the composer.
#15
Quote by Shackman10
You can "play a cover" (if that's what you call playing something like Bach) and put more feeling into it than you ever would playing your own song. There are lots of ways to interpret a piece and make it your own - and it can be even more rewarding to the performer than to the composer.

+1. Most music for classical guitar, which is where you should begin anyway, is in sheet music form.

Also, if you flat-out refuse to play others' songs, you're really screwing yourself. Seeing how other people use specific musical concepts is quite invaluable.
#16
Quote by Shackman10
You're really wrong. Flamenco on the guitar is a high performance art, like other classical music on the violin or piano, and you need to be classically trained and dedicate probably your life to the playing of it to actually learn it - not just poorly imitate it.

Also, I might get some flak for saying this, but you probably don't need to know theory that much. If you're playing from sheet music then you don't need theory at all, but if you want to interpret pieces to the best of your ability then you should learn what's going on so you can bring out all the voicings and harmonies as the composer intended.

Anyone who plays any instrument seriously should be classically trained anyway. I have found that it is not so much the classical training in that instrument that matters but classical training in general. I was a classically trained violinist with nine years of training and switched over to guitar seven years ago with little to no additional effort. That is beside the point. Flamenco is an oral tradition and concept and not a method of training. If you are in anyway familiar with the three different art forms in music you know you have three types:
1. Classical
2. Folk
3. Commercial

Flamenco is a folk style and NOT a classical form. Its origin is completely in folk music, but it got its own style because of its differences from conventional folk at the time. Learn your **** before you talk ****.
Last edited by silentdud at Jun 1, 2008,
#17
What's with the last paragraph? I don't think anyone said that flamenco was a classical form, but rather that the techniques in classical would provide a solid foundation for moving into flamenco.
#18
YOU'RE ALL WRONG.

Right, let's start off from the origins.

Flamenco, is a form of music, based in Spain, with moorish roots. It is a form of folk music, you like it or not. It's also commercial. It has no relation to classical guitar or classical music. It's often confused with Spanish folklore, but this is not the same thing! It's played by gypsies(generally) and is part of their culture. Not Spanish culture. Gypsy culture. Not Spanish.


theres a video lesson with rodrigo y gabriella on it (or something similar to flamenco, i don't know the subtle differences, but it's that kinda sound) on musicradar.com if thats any help.


Wrong wrong wrong. Rodrigo and Gabriela have NOTHING, to do with flamenco. They do not play in compas, their music isn't based in Moorish traditions, it isn't played by gypsies but by Mexicans that used to have a heavy metal band.


I suggest go and buy a book. Theres a lot that come with a CD and they show all the necessary techniques etc. One book is usually better than browsing through a bunch of sites IMO.



There is truth in this statement. Browsing through sites is pointless. The best is just to buy CDs and transcribe. You'll understand how the music is constructed.


FretboardtoAsh is the only person that knows his stuff in the whole thread from what I've seen.

Hah...you think you can learn flamenco off tabs and youtube videos? Try years and years of practice, study and dedication


That's nice motivation. He doesn't want expertise he wants to be able to play a few basic things, you can get that from youtube. If he finds vids that teach about compas, he'll get somewhere soon.


Flamenco is just finger picking and general concepts mostly. There are a few good video's out there on it that might be worth watching, just look on amazon. There is a large concern for modal theory in flamenco, so if you don't know your ****, learn it.



Bull****.

Flamenco isn't just fingerpicking. It's complicated fingerpicking that falls into el compas. If you don't have compas, you won't get anywhere because you won't be able to accompany properly, let alone play on your own.

MODAL? Do you even know what modal music is? Flamenco is heavily based on non diatonic scales, not modes. There are modes, like pieces based a lot on phrygian dominant or phrygian but to say that all flamenco is modal is just pulling stuff out of your hat.


allot of flamenco players really don't have formal training really. It's all by ear and by... i guess in our day and age... youtube. I learned how to play guitar by watching peoples hands on videos.



Wrong again. The best flamenco players, had proper training. Take Paco De Lucia, he was locked up in his room, 8 hours a day when he was a kid, practising arpeggios and scales with his father and he was only allowed to go play once he was done with his guitar study. That may not be a conservatory of music, but it's formal training.

You're going to want formal instruction and probably need it. Find a classical guitar teacher first, get the basic techniques down well, and then find a specific instructor for flamenco. It's not something you can easily go about learning by yourself.


Whilst this may be true, classical guitar(it's happened to me, I can't play flamenco well in compas to save my life) ruins your timing in anything that isn't classical. I've found I can't play with a pick perfectly in time and it's because of classical guitar, let alone play in compas well. He can learn the techniques, but he shouldn't learn classical guitar, seeing that flamenco and classical guitar have nothing to do with each other.


This doesn't mean I wouldn't recommend the TS to learn classical guitar, in fact, I encourage you to learn classical and not flamenco. But I'm biassed.


You're really wrong. Flamenco on the guitar is a high performance art, like other classical music on the violin or piano, and you need to be classically trained and dedicate probably your life to the playing of it to actually learn it - not just poorly imitate it.



No. You don't need classical training. You need any type of proper training.

Anyone who plays any instrument seriously should be classically trained anyway. I have found that it is not so much the classical training in that instrument that matters but classical training in general. I was a classically trained violinist with nine years of training and switched over to guitar seven years ago with little to no additional effort. That is beside the point. Flamenco is an oral tradition and concept and not a method of training. If you are in anyway familiar with the three different art forms in music you know you have three types:
1. Classical
2. Folk
3. Commercial

Flamenco is a folk style and NOT a classical form. Its origin is completely in folk music, but it got its own style because of its differences from conventional folk at the time. Learn your **** before you talk ****.



You're completely wrong. I'm a trained violinist through Suzuki for 6 years and now I'm studying classical guitar in a conservatory. I'm not a better musician than many people I know on UG that haven't played classical music in their whole life. It's based on the amount of effort you put in your music, not the amount of formal training.

Also, that last bit about not method of training... bull****. There are different schools. And there are more forms of music than those. That are neither classical, folk nor comercial. Go look up composers that rather than composing through the classical sense or harmony and tonality are trying to discover new ways to create new sounds and music.
Last edited by confusius at Jun 1, 2008,
#19
Quote by confusius
YOU'RE ALL WRONG.

Right, let's start off from the origins.

Flamenco, is a form of music, based in Spain, with moorish roots. It is a form of folk music, you like it or not. It's also commercial. It has no relation to classical guitar or classical music. It's often confused with Spanish folklore, but this is not the same thing! It's played by gypsies(generally) and is part of their culture. Not Spanish culture. Gypsy culture. Not Spanish.


Wrong wrong wrong. Rodrigo and Gabriela have NOTHING, to do with flamenco. They do not play in compas, their music isn't based in Moorish traditions, it isn't played by gypsies but by Mexicans that used to have a heavy metal band.


I don't have the time to address every gaping wound in your statements but I will address just that one.


There is truth in this statement. Browsing through sites is pointless. The best is just to buy CDs and transcribe. You'll understand how the music is constructed.


FretboardtoAsh is the only person that knows his stuff in the whole thread from what I've seen.


That's nice motivation. He doesn't want expertise he wants to be able to play a few basic things, you can get that from youtube. If he finds vids that teach about compas, he'll get somewhere soon.


Bull****.

Flamenco isn't just fingerpicking. It's complicated fingerpicking that falls into el compas. If you don't have compas, you won't get anywhere because you won't be able to accompany properly, let alone play on your own.

MODAL? Do you even know what modal music is? Flamenco is heavily based on non diatonic scales, not modes. There are modes, like pieces based a lot on phrygian dominant or phrygian but to say that all flamenco is modal is just pulling stuff out of your hat.


Wrong again. The best flamenco players, had proper training. Take Paco De Lucia, he was locked up in his room, 8 hours a day when he was a kid, practising arpeggios and scales with his father and he was only allowed to go play once he was done with his guitar study. That may not be a conservatory of music, but it's formal training.


Whilst this may be true, classical guitar(it's happened to me, I can't play flamenco well in compas to save my life) ruins your timing in anything that isn't classical. I've found I can't play with a pick perfectly in time and it's because of classical guitar, let alone play in compas well. He can learn the techniques, but he shouldn't learn classical guitar, seeing that flamenco and classical guitar have nothing to do with each other.


This doesn't mean I wouldn't recommend the TS to learn classical guitar, in fact, I encourage you to learn classical and not flamenco. But I'm biassed.


No. You don't need classical training. You need any type of proper training.


You're completely wrong. I'm a trained violinist through Suzuki for 6 years and now I'm studying classical guitar in a conservatory. I'm not a better musician than many people I know on UG that haven't played classical music in their whole life. It's based on the amount of effort you put in your music, not the amount of formal training.

Also, that last bit about not method of training... bull****. There are different schools. And there are more forms of music than those. That are neither classical, folk nor comercial. Go look up composers that rather than composing through the classical sense or harmony and tonality are trying to discover new ways to create new sounds and music.


You really, really do not know what you are talking about. Those are the three root forms of music. Any new form is some sombination of those. In some textbooks commercial is substituted for popular but it is all the same idea.

Second of all, classical training is only good to teach you to discipline yourself. If you are a wild guitarist who just fiddles around with their instrument you are screwed and you might as well lay down, turn on some depressing music, and kill yourself. Discipline is the chief product of classical training in the same fashion that standing in line in the supreme accomplishment of elementary school.
Last edited by silentdud at Jun 1, 2008,
#20
You're not seeing the point. I'm not talking about not taking classical training to be a good musician, I'm talking about the ridiculousness of the idea of having to learn classical guitar to play flamenco. The two styles are completely unrelated. Also, classical training is not indispensable to be a good guitarist in other styles such as prog, or shred or even jazz.


Classical guitar does teach discipline but that doesn't mean you can't be disciplined without it.

If you are a wild guitarist who just fiddles around with their instrument you are screwed and you might as well lay down, turn on some depressing music, and kill yourself.



Where in my post did I talk about wild guitarists that just fiddle with their instruments? I'm talking of people the level of Sabicas, Niño Josele, Paco De Lucia etc. Those guys aren't weekend guitarists, are they?
#21
There aren't three types of music, because all music blends together and borrows from other music.

Handel was the "pop" music of the Baroque era, but he is still considered classical today. Bela Bartok based a large amount of his music on Eastern European folk music he heard in rural villages, but his music is still considered classical.

Just because you most likely heard from one person about this "3 kinds of music" idea doesn't mean it's the truth, and if you came up with it yourself then you're delusional.
#22
Quote by mepmep
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wi8bPrMDvb8&feature=related
I want to play like this guy, whats that style?


that would be a soleares, it's a sub-genre and also the socalled mother of flamenco.

Quote by confusius
YOU'RE ALL WRONG.

Flamenco isn't just fingerpicking. It's complicated fingerpicking that falls into el compas. If you don't have compas, you won't get anywhere because you won't be able to accompany properly, let alone play on your own.


--0------------------0--1-----------------1-------------------------------------3p0--------------------
--------------1-----------------------3-------------2-------------------------2-----------------------
-------------------3----------------------3-------------0----0------------3--------------------------
-----------2----------------------0------------------------2------------2---------------------------
--3----------------------1--------------------------0-----------3-1-0------------------------------
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Generated some fingerpicking in bulerias compas for you
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
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Last edited by FretboardToAsh at Jun 2, 2008,
#23
Someone that does not know about flamenco does not know the Buleria accent form and whilst they may be able to get it with those tabs intuitively they won't understand how you've done it, which is why I'd say forget the complicated technique for now and stick to learning compas and how to play in compas.
#24
You always need a classical base for playing any style of music AND you want to be good at it. Flamenco, for example, is based in minor and diminished chords and scales and it is similar to some of the stuff that Malmsteem plays but played on a classical guitar. Flamenco uses the Phrygian Scale a lot (like Malmsteem), but Malmsteem is Neoclassical Rock. Both of them have the root in classical music and studying classical music would help for both of this styles.
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#25
Flamenco has no roots in classical music or anything to do with classical music. It may be fingerpicked, but that doesn't mean it's classical. It may used phrygian, diminished chords, minor chords, non diatonic scales, but theory isn't exclusive to classical music, it's universal.
#26
From what I know flamenco has its bases in rhythm, and compas or whatever...
I don't know much about it, and can't remember how it was, but it had some kind of irregulat pattern of sorts...

Besides the fact that it is played in a flamenco guitar, but has nothing to do with classical, apart from the fact that you need practise for both....

That's all I know
#27
Quote by Pepefloydean
You always need a classical base for playing any style of music AND you want to be good at it.


bullcrap, I know artists and friends that don't have classical training and they're very very skilled. The fact that I'm better is only cause I dedicate myself more to it, there isn't a moment where there isn't music in my head.

Flamenco, for example, is based in minor and diminished chords and scales .


bullcrap again, allegrias uses a so called happy-scale we know as major

and it is similar to some of the stuff that Malmsteem plays but played on a classical guitar. .


bullcrap no.3 , malmsteen does not play in compas and if he even knows what it is I doubt he's be able to.

Flamenco uses the Phrygian Scale a lot (like Malmsteem), but Malmsteem is Neoclassical Rock. .


bullcrap no.4 Soleares, siguiriyas and tarantas tend to be in phrygian but allegrias is in a major scale wich may be both ways but not doesn't the harmonic scale. Allegrias also has a part called silencio wich tends to be in minor.
Bulerias may be played in any scale the tocaor wants to, and to get the last one there are very few flamenco guitarists that know a scale if you name it.

Both of them have the root in classical music and studying classical music would help for both of this styles.


last bullcrap call, flamenco does not have any roots at classical music and the position of your hands and posture will not help your playing since it's a lot different.
flamenco usually is played with rest strokes, and as confusius already said it will ruin your feel for the compas.
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
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#28
there are quite a few videos of Paco De Lucia out there, watch what he's doing especially with his right hand, and try to imitate it until you get the sound right (this can be quite difficult, and you absolutely must have a classical guitar and long fingernails on your picking hand)

then get some sheet music for some traditional Flamenco tunes and try to play them using said techniques.

as for everyone else, give it a rest, this whole argument is just sad, the guy only want's to dabble in a new style not become the next De Lucia or Romero (Pepe Romero is another guy you should study, he's amazing)
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#30
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
there are quite a few videos of Paco De Lucia out there, watch what he's doing especially with his right hand, and try to imitate it until you get the sound right (this can be quite difficult, and you absolutely must have a classical guitar and long fingernails on your picking hand)

then get some sheet music for some traditional Flamenco tunes and try to play them using said techniques.

as for everyone else, give it a rest, this whole argument is just sad, the guy only want's to dabble in a new style not become the next De Lucia or Romero (Pepe Romero is another guy you should study, he's amazing)


And that is exactly the wrong way to study flamenco, you should begin at the start not the finish. Don't go at the hardest stuff at once, if you have to watch someones hands it would be a good idea but vicente amigo shows his hands changes more clear.

First read up on the styles and then slowly try learning different falseta's and techniques, a misunderstood thing is that people tend to think flamenco is just like any other style.
Wich I'm afraid it isn't, pure flamenco is composed on the spot from different rythm fragments and falseta's(a little lick/or solo in between or such). Later when the guitar and it's players(tocaors) became more and more defined and advanced there came solo pieces in existence.

But if you're going to learn something do it right, there is absolutely no sense in learning the hardest stuff at the beginning not understanding what it's meant to be - wich you would have known if you started with simple falseta's and such.

Flamenco guitar is meant as accompaniment for singing(cante) and dance(baile), this is where it started and that is exactly where beginners should start. Not at the newest innovations.
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
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#31
Quote by FretboardToAsh
And that is exactly the wrong way to study flamenco, you should begin at the start not the finish. Don't go at the hardest stuff at once, if you have to watch someones hands it would be a good idea but vicente amigo shows his hands changes more clear.

First read up on the styles and then slowly try learning different falseta's and techniques, a misunderstood thing is that people tend to think flamenco is just like any other style.
Wich I'm afraid it isn't, pure flamenco is composed on the spot from different rythm fragments and falseta's(a little lick/or solo in between or such). Later when the guitar and it's players(tocaors) became more and more defined and advanced there came solo pieces in existence.

But if you're going to learn something do it right, there is absolutely no sense in learning the hardest stuff at the beginning not understanding what it's meant to be - wich you would have known if you started with simple falseta's and such.

Flamenco guitar is meant as accompaniment for singing(cante) and dance(baile), this is where it started and that is exactly where beginners should start. Not at the newest innovations.


I just suggested that because that's how I learned how to do most of that stuff, and not everything he ddoes is super difficult either (at least not if you slow it down initially) I definitely agree about learning different rhythm patterns and breaks near the start too, but the right hand technique is fairly unique to flamenco music and should be a priority, no matter how difficult it is.

I think the main difference is that you are approaching this from an academic standpoint whereas I'm looking at it from the point of view of a musician who wants to learn new tricks.
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#32
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
I think the main difference is that you are approaching this from an academic standpoint whereas I'm looking at it from the point of view of a musician who wants to learn new tricks.


Not as much as an academic point of view but more like getting people to skip the stuff I did and they don't need. The last thing we need is another goofball running around saying he can play 'flamingo' and starts raping Asturias.

I merely approached the question as to how to start in the way I'm taught(traditionally) and learned from experience on my own.
And it is a very logical answer to not start with music made by someone who is very possibly the best guitarist in the world and is generally seen as the messias in flamenco.
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
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#33
Quote by confusius
YOU'RE ALL WRONG.

Right, let's start off from the origins.

Flamenco, is a form of music, based in Spain, with moorish roots. It is a form of folk music, you like it or not. It's also commercial. It has no relation to classical guitar or classical music. It's often confused with Spanish folklore, but this is not the same thing! It's played by gypsies(generally) and is part of their culture. Not Spanish culture. Gypsy culture. Not Spanish.


Sorry mate, but flamenco is completely spanish and is a huge part of spanish culture. It was developed entirely in spain but somehow its not spanish? Also, the Gypsies that created the music where spanish gypsies known as gitanos. You are a retard
#34
also it is very related to classical guitar, its played in a very similar technical style and the music does cross paths pretty often. Much of the repitore written for classical guitar is spanish and often includes flamenco techniques such as reasgeaudos!!!
#35
Quote by Captain Garry
Sorry mate, but flamenco is completely spanish and is a huge part of spanish culture. It was developed entirely in spain but somehow its not spanish? Also, the Gypsies that created the music where spanish gypsies known as gitanos. You are a retard

also it is very related to classical guitar, its played in a very similar technical style and the music does cross paths pretty often. Much of the repitore written for classical guitar is spanish and often includes flamenco techniques such as reasgeaudos!!!

allright now this makes me mad, I'm gonna rant about this for a bit so read well cause I ain't repeating no more.

flamenco is the result of several groups of cultures wich where bounded together against the same enemy. it has it's roots in the music of the gypsies, jews, moors(arabian or such, the term moor is never clearly enough defined) and with time(as in decades) some folk songs from spain and even later from cuba got incorporated in flamenco, sevillanas and rumba are examples of these.

These completely different groups of cultures where given 3 choices when they arrived in spain, either convert or die. The last option being trying to explain why you shouldn't have to convert wich is quite hard to do in a torture chamber. Thus all these cultures got the chance to steal idea's from eachother and while most of the jews and moors eventually fled spain the gypsies stayed, mostly in andalucia. The rest of Spain is nowadays pretty much oblivious to flamenco and it is practiced more outside of it than in Spain itself(with the exception of andalusia that is)

And still the connection between classical music and flamenco techniques are not much more blur to me, the tremolo's of the flamenca are in fifths and the classical is in fourths(pussies) allright that one seems easy enought. But for christ sakes andres segovia even tried to have the rasgueado banned from classical music because it was created by the dirtie(not gentle) hands of the gypsies, stupid racist ****.

He failed of course, the rasguaedo eventually ending up in the guitarist interpretation of asturias(it was a pianist song - classical music for those of you wondering composed by isaac albeniz), and now every idiot who can play it starts screaming he can play flamenco... sigh...

clear now?
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
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#36
yeah flamenco came from a bunch of different cultures but it was these cultures living together IN SPAIN!!!!! That makes it spanish!!!

"Although considered part of the culture of Spain in general, flamenco actually originates from one region: Andalusia. However, other areas, mainly Extremadura and Murcia, have contributed to the development of several flamenco musical forms, and a great number of renowned flamenco artists have been born in other territories of the state. The roots of flamenco are not precisely known, but it is generally acknowledged that flamenco grew out of the unique interplay of native Andalusian, Islamic, Sephardic, and Gypsy cultures that existed in Andalusia prior to and after the Reconquest."
#37
Quote by FretboardToAsh
Not as much as an academic point of view but more like getting people to skip the stuff I did and they don't need. The last thing we need is another goofball running around saying he can play 'flamingo' and starts raping Asturias.

I merely approached the question as to how to start in the way I'm taught(traditionally) and learned from experience on my own.
And it is a very logical answer to not start with music made by someone who is very possibly the best guitarist in the world and is generally seen as the messias in flamenco.


well if you want to go that route, more power to you, but I think this guy just wanted to learn some Flamenco techniques to apply to whatever his music is, and IMO it's best to learn those from observing people who are really really really good at them.
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#38
Quote by Captain Garry
yeah flamenco came from a bunch of different cultures but it was these cultures living together IN SPAIN!!!!! That makes it spanish!!!

"Although considered part of the culture of Spain in general, flamenco actually originates from one region: Andalusia. However, other areas, mainly Extremadura and Murcia, have contributed to the development of several flamenco musical forms, and a great number of renowned flamenco artists have been born in other territories of the state. The roots of flamenco are not precisely known, but it is generally acknowledged that flamenco grew out of the unique interplay of native Andalusian, Islamic, Sephardic, and Gypsy cultures that existed in Andalusia prior to and after the Reconquest."


I never said it wasn't spanish, I did say it wasn't the spanish that came up with it. Thus it not being all that spanish and unfortunately not that big a part of the spanish culture. It's actually being frowned upon by a big part of Spain because it's connected to the gypsies wich just don't have that big of a reputation there(this is what I've heard and read so don't pin me down on it).
On that it's either agree or disagree and doesn't really contribute to the question, I can't consider it spanish cause of above mentioned reasons and you think the opposite way wich sounds logical enough. Btw, the gypsies are said to be from india and I can't see that as spanish at all.

the quote however doesn't make sense if you read the above statement I made - it basically says the same thing, so why post it?
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Last edited by FretboardToAsh at Jun 6, 2008,
#39
Sorry mate, but flamenco is completely spanish and is a huge part of spanish culture. It was developed entirely in spain but somehow its not spanish? Also, the Gypsies that created the music where spanish gypsies known as gitanos. You are a retard



I'm afraid someone doesn't know the difference between state and culture, or even nation. Do you know how many nations there are in the state of Spain? Many. And cultures? More. Something that is born in a culture based in Spain does not make it Spanish, for the Spaniard culture did not participate in it's creation, the travelling gypsy troupes did.


I have to agree with fretboard to ash on his point about flamenco being related to the rest of Spain. It isn't at all. I live in Asturias and when I say flamenco, the people around at me look at me as if I was an outsider. Because I am. Here they listen to gaitas(bagpipes) in el folk asturiano.


Se perfectamente lo que significa la palabra gitano y no necesito que me lo explices ni que te creas superior por sablerlo.


On a completely separate point, you don't need to call me a retard to prove yourself right or wrong. See that's diverting from your ability to post coherently in order to explain your ideas or prove your point and goes right into flaming. Flaming is absolutely pointless and makes you, look like the retard, not myself.
#40
To start off , you might want to give paul gilberts song "flamingo" a try, it's not as technical as most flamenco that has been mentioned but i belive its good for beginners.

mind you this is coming from a flamenco noob
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