#1
I understand theory but i want to know how to play music that sounds kind of progressive indie rock any advice?
#3
Quote by jacksonstrings1
I understand theory but i want to know how to play music that sounds kind of progressive indie rock any advice?
Rock means electric guitars. Progressive usually means where the usually form of music is abondoned (Verse chorus and so on). And Indie is any music thats not signed to a major label.

So refuse any record deals from major labels, use electric guitars, and write many different riffs and connect them together.
#4
Progressive Indie Rock...

Well let's see.

Progessive rock is some of the most trying and difficult music to create. It demands commitment to music itself to know enough about scales, modes, techniques, time signatures, interchanges and chords. The aim of progressive is to make a song as interesting and varied as possible, while still making sure the listener knows it is the same song. Often it can be very difficult.

Indie Rock. I've never known Progressive Rock to be Indie for one simply reason. If you don't hear it, if it isn't commercially accessible then people just aren't interested. Indie became popular for being short and simple, usually focussing on the lyrics and taking attention away from the music itself.

In my opinion they're at completely opposite ends of the spectrum.
#5
Quote by colohue
Indie Rock. I've never known Progressive Rock to be Indie for one simply reason. If you don't hear it, if it isn't commercially accessible then people just aren't interested. Indie became popular for being short and simple, usually focussing on the lyrics and taking attention away from the music itself.
I know this is off-topic but...

Vocals were only added to music in the pre-baroque times and in the last 100 years. Before that, vocal music was seen as low-brow (as in it was for stupid people).
#7
I would listen to Rush's Hemispheres for a crach course in Prog music, myself. That whole album is not only technically difficult, but it's got this one concept to the first side of the album that I've never heard in music before; the album before that, "A Farewell to Kings," closes with the song "Cygnux: X-1," and Hemispheres starts with "Cygnus: X-1, Book Two." These two songs have COMPLETELY different stories to begin with, but then Neil Peart just magically makes the two stories connect with each other (in a way that makes sense), and they take the end of the first song and play it in the second just to indicate that the two stories have now connected. I've never heard that before, and the whole idea of it has always impressed me...

... And then there's also the fact that the musicianship on that album is amazing. Seriously, the odd time signatures, the PLAYING (listen to La Villa Strangiato, you'll see what I mean). It's just an impressive album.
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#8
Indie isn't progressive at all, if anything it's regressive because it just rehashes what's been done previously. Like most music nowadays.
#9
Quote by demonofthenight
I know this is off-topic but...

Vocals were only added to music in the pre-baroque times and in the last 100 years. Before that, vocal music was seen as low-brow (as in it was for stupid people).


Stop posting about things you dont know anything about. You are completely wrong
#10
back to the topic.

progressive indie? that would basically suggest that you would be pushing the boundaries of the indie genre of music. so how would you do that? and do you know any progressive indie bands? animal collective is the first i can think of. most progressive indie usually ends up sounding like post-punk anyway.

EDIT: i forgot to give my advice! haha.

learn to write indie music. look at the typical song constructions and chord styles. from there start experimenting and putting different "non-indie" rhythms to the riffs and chord changes. progressive music is playing with forms mostly. so do that.
#11
the label "progressive" tends to get blurred...music on its own merit ... example: look at the sheet music from "steely dan" ... a wide range of music dynamics used in each song..unexpected key changes ... very demanding guitar solos..very cool creative progressions and extensive use of altered chords and voicing ... intriguing lyrics..

a song like "ricky dont loose that number" sounds so very simple to the ear...its great fun to play and a very good study for anyone thinking of doing advanced studio work as their charts are what you would get as the guitarist..a challange to the best guitarists

wolf
#12
Quote by jacksonstrings1
I understand theory but i want to know how to play music that sounds kind of progressive indie rock any advice?



the best way to achieve a particular sound, is by 1st imitating that sound.
Learn "progressive indie rock" songs/riffs/solos/licks if thats what your after.


Don't look for superficial aspects, but instead get into the music itself. Learn what it feels like to play it. Use your mind and make sense of what they are doing.
Spend some time learning 1st, then come back to writing.
shred is gaudy music
#13
Quote by Captain Garry
You are completely wrong
Any reason for saying that? or do you just like contradicting people?