#1
It looks like an easy chord to name, but I cannot find it on that "all the chords" tab someone made

[x x 2 2 3 1]
#9
wait though, if I am playing a C (x 3 2 0 1 0) and then I go into the other C (x 3 2 0 1 3), how do I differentiate when writing out the chords on paper?
#12
Low to high: C E G C G
C E G is a major triad.
C G is a perfect fifth (Interval of 7 frets)
#13
Both chords are C major, they are just different voicings. To differentiate the two on paper, you would either show it in standard notation or tab
#14
Quote by P0undc4k3
wait though, if I am playing a C (x 3 2 0 1 0) and then I go into the other C (x 3 2 0 1 3), how do I differentiate when writing out the chords on paper?
There's no such thing as Cmaj5, so ignore that post.

You would write out the chord diagrams and label different voicings for the same chord as C1, C2, C3, etc (with the number as a subscript; do NOT let C7 be confused with C7!). In the music, you would say to play C with the subscript denoting the corresponding voicing.