#1
So I have been trying to write some stuff for my band but I'm a bassist and drummer by trade so I can't really write any good guitar part, all I'm really able to write with is power chords and some simple open chords I know.

What can I do to start writing more interesting guitar parts? I do own a couple of cheap guitars so I can start learning if need be the question is what would be best to learn from a songwriting perspective?
#3
well start with the power chords and pick them apart...observe each note in the chord and see what notes they sound good with in playing.....the try to play those notes together using hammer ons....tapping and such......
#4
nothing rong with power chords man....... you could maybe add a little guitar lick somewhere in the song...... along with solo if your into that ****.....
#5
Quote by Ripper_66
So I have been trying to write some stuff for my band but I'm a bassist and drummer by trade so I can't really write any good guitar part, all I'm really able to write with is power chords and some simple open chords I know.

What can I do to start writing more interesting guitar parts? I do own a couple of cheap guitars so I can start learning if need be the question is what would be best to learn from a songwriting perspective?


Get the guitarist to write the guitar parts to suit his playing.
/thread.
#7
We play rock I'm not really sure what to compare us to but think sort of Foo Fighters/Nirvana sort of stuff.

I know that there is nothing wrong with power chords but I would like to write more diverse songs. I've been trying to write some acoustic stuff and power chords won't work there :P
#8
Well in something like Nirvana's "Heart Shaped Box" Kurt really broke up an...E5? I think, or a D5...i cant tell when it's in drop d, but just try to arpeggiate chords. Alternativley, you could make a powerchord rhythmn, and add nice arpeggiated possibly octaved notes on the top. Just play around. Slash made the Sweet Child o Mine riff by doing a scale's notes in a different order.
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#10
Slash made the Sweet Child o Mine riff by doing a scale's notes in a different order.


Which is how 99% of music today is made.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Figure out what key you're in and substitute the diatonic triads for the power chords.
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#13
+1

i actually recommend listening to lots of different styles of music and maybe transcribing what you like to guitar (or get the sheet music and look at how the music moves) there are lots of influences in music, techno might contain elements of classical, jazz and pop. metal might contain some blues, classical and jazz. pop has bits of everything in it. just really look at how music is written to start getting something new.
#14
learn the:

major, minor, dominant 7ths, major 7ths, diminished, augmented, sus2 and sus4 chords.

also.. theres nothing wrong with power chords.... sometimes thats what you want to use.
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#15
Quote by Ripper_66
We play rock I'm not really sure what to compare us to but think sort of Foo Fighters/Nirvana sort of stuff.

I know that there is nothing wrong with power chords but I would like to write more diverse songs. I've been trying to write some acoustic stuff and power chords won't work there :P


I think the idea of listening to music outside your usual spectrum could really help. Go listen to a folk song and look up a tab/chart of it, you'll start picking up new chords.
#16
Quote by Archeo Avis
Which is how 99% of music today is made.

Haha except rap. Rap is made just like a Mr Men book; by sitting on a keyboard
But yeah, you know what i meant lol
Quote by Jackolas
edgespear, driving great ideas again. Sir, you pwn.

Gear:
Guitar: Epiphone Les Paul, PRS SE Floyd Custom 24 Floyd Amethyst
Amp: Peavey 6505, Eleven Rack
#18
Harmonize single notes, so let's say 5th and 7th fret d string, and the other plays 9th and 10th on d....
#19
Barre chords are a handy substitute for power chords.
Thats what i did anyway, i used to be the same as you.
i'd tap that .........speaking to a bass, its a music joke!

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#21
Quote by Ripper_66
We play rock I'm not really sure what to compare us to but think sort of Foo Fighters/Nirvana sort of stuff.

I know that there is nothing wrong with power chords but I would like to write more diverse songs. I've been trying to write some acoustic stuff and power chords won't work there :P

Power chords worked fine for nirvana. Just curious why are you writing guitar parts if your the bassist. What is the guitarist doing?

To answer your question you really just have to learn more chords and some music theory I recomend "Guitar Logic". Its very well written and it goes through guitar playing technique and theory related to guitar. It has charts of chords , chord scales and various other scales , modes etc in the back and if you read the stuff in the middle you would learn what to do with it.
#22
Keep in mind that there's nothing wrong with power chords; there's a good reason they've been used so extensively. Also, they'll allow you great freedom when creating a lead over top of a part consisting of only power chords.

With that said, learn the basics of chord construction and scale theory as said above, and you'll learn how things work together and be able to figure out what goes where.
#23
Quote by /-\liceNChains
Power chords worked fine for nirvana. Just curious why are you writing guitar parts if your the bassist. What is the guitarist doing?

To answer your question you really just have to learn more chords and some music theory I recomend "Guitar Logic". Its very well written and it goes through guitar playing technique and theory related to guitar. It has charts of chords , chord scales and various other scales , modes etc in the back and if you read the stuff in the middle you would learn what to do with it.


Smells like Teen Spirit uses full barre chords.
Actually called Mark!

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#24
Quote by steven seagull
Smells like Teen Spirit uses full barre chords.

You're back to start this argument in MT now? We didn't have enough people arguing about this in the Basics forum?
#25
You should be able to get by on power chords depending on what kind of band you are. I have the same problem. I play guitar and can write the parts. Just not very good parts usually lol. I know a thing or two about the bass and can make the notes correspond to the guitar and I know absolutly nothing about the drums other then you hit them with drumsticks and it makes noise lol.
#28
Quote by MV4824
One word: Arppegios.


How will that help him?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#29
Yeah he might not know what an arpeggio is ...

But hey, Green Day get by on just power chords and theyre a good band right?...*silence*...guys ? *empty room*...
Quote by Jackolas
edgespear, driving great ideas again. Sir, you pwn.

Gear:
Guitar: Epiphone Les Paul, PRS SE Floyd Custom 24 Floyd Amethyst
Amp: Peavey 6505, Eleven Rack
#30
Quote by MetalMusicianAl
learn how to really play your instrument



indeed...

if you are having troubles replacing power chords it cause you dont know any other chords
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It's just me and Doris here ;_;



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Poops is the chat MC - but here we know him as Early Cuyler.


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#31
Quote by Ripper_66
So I have been trying to write some stuff for my band but I'm a bassist and drummer by trade so I can't really write any good guitar part, all I'm really able to write with is power chords and some simple open chords I know.

What can I do to start writing more interesting guitar parts? I do own a couple of cheap guitars so I can start learning if need be the question is what would be best to learn from a songwriting perspective?



The reason all you can write with is power chords, is probably because thats what your most comfortable with. Its likely that most of the songs you've learned and or listen to are mostly if not exclusively played with power chords.

solution:
Learn new chords, learn new songs, learn new styles. Then come back to writing after you've broadened your perspective.
#32
Quote by /-\liceNChains

To answer your question you really just have to learn more chords and some music theory I recomend "Guitar Logic". Its very well written and it goes through guitar playing technique and theory related to guitar. It has charts of chords , chord scales and various other scales , modes etc in the back and if you read the stuff in the middle you would learn what to do with it.


Why is everybody on here trying to sell something? ha-ha
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#33
Quote by MetalMusicianAl
learn how to really play your instrument


Don't be so cocky, sometimes 5th chords are the way to go.

As already stated, try different genres or barre chords. I often play intervals over the chord itself, which sounds cool. Mess around with that.
#34
Are you a fan of Alice in Chains at all? Cantrell uses a lot of open chords with distortion and they sound pretty good. Just listen to the chorus to Man in the Box