#1
Hello all,

I'm interested in hearing anecdotes from those who have played a Steinberger guitar. Yes, they look funny, but I that's not the type of info I'm fishing for

I'm intrigued by their design, their building materials, and, of course, their Trans-trem.

If you have tried one, did you like the tone? Why?

What sort of music did you play with the Steinberger? Was the guitar appropriate for the musical genre?

Do you think the double-balled strings are worth it? Why?

Did the trans-trem work well for you? I hear they bend the strings such that they stay in tune relative to each other, making bending full chords possible. I also hear they can go up and down half-steps and full steps. Insights?

Thanks!
#3
Im guessing your more interested in the original GL series. Since the 90's steinberger has produced similar instruments using all wood or wood with graphite necks. I own an all-maple version of the GL series. The all graphite ones have an unique tone due to the even frequency response of graphite. The major complaint with the tone is that it is too "sterile" and lacks the warmth of wood, but this can be used as an advantage for jazz or electronic styles. The main reason I like these guitars is the ergonomics; the instruments are a decent bit lighter and are incredibly balanced.
Gear:
Modded Steinberger Spirit (white) (SD-AH/EMG Select)
Modded Steinberger GP-2R (white) (EMG81/60)
Peavey XXL head
Hughes and Kettner Cream Machine
Hughes and Kettner Blues Master
#4
I've never played a Steinberger (though I would love to), but I've heard that when Gibson bought them out, they totally ruined them.
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#5
I've also read some bad reviews about their quality control, but I tend to take on-line reviews with a pound of salt until I find out more first-hand. Your suggestion that this could have resulted from their buy-out from Gibson is plausible, as Gibson's qc has been receiving much criticism lately, too.

Any other Steinberger anecdotes? Any high-gain players out there who have experience with them?
#6
Here's my question: if they're so good, why didn't EVH stick with them? And why don't all the greats use them? It's not like they can't afford them; I know their endorsements are lucrative, but still, you never even hear them mention them. It's always Strat-this or Gibson-that. Having said all of this, I'm intrigued by them, and am thinking about the GM4T; the major thing holding me back is the fact that, like I said, none of the greats use them. We need some Steinberger owners to weigh in here. Are you out there?
#7
Quote by Bullitt9919
Here's my question: if they're so good, why didn't EVH stick with them? And why don't all the greats use them? It's not like they can't afford them; I know their endorsements are lucrative, but still, you never even hear them mention them. It's always Strat-this or Gibson-that. Having said all of this, I'm intrigued by them, and am thinking about the GM4T; the major thing holding me back is the fact that, like I said, none of the greats use them. We need some Steinberger owners to weigh in here. Are you out there?


your response is illogical as you could say Gibson LP or Fender strat and use the same logic. how come all the greats don't use them. different strokes for different folks.

the Steinbergers in ? have a very different feel to them than a standard guitar. i've played a few and they just don't have the same feel. this may account for why many players don't use them. they also tend to use active pickups which some (including myself) aren't big fans of. the trem is prett amazing. as mentioned they were very expensive so most players couldn't afford them. i think that most players start with a style or brand of guitar and get used to that so they don't necessarily branch out to far. this may seem kinda stupid but the original ones just plain don't look cool. there have been some high profile users , Buck Dharma from Blue Oyster Cult comes to mind.
#8
They seem to be pretty popular with jazz fusion guys, from what little experience I have with those guitarists. Alan Holdsworth is the big name endorser for guitars, but Cynic has used them pretty extensively and I seem to recall T.J. Helmerich using them quite a bit.

They can handle just about anything out there as far as tones go. I'm a huge fan of the sounds that the three artists I mentioned get out of them, but I can guarantee you that they can get just about any sound in the world. I think the two things keeping them out of the mainstream are their unusual shapes and their price tag, though I feel like they're pretty well liked in the bass community judging by the number of users out there.
#9
As mentioned, Paul Masvidal of Cynic and Aeon Spoke uses them exclusively, and he's awesome. I've never played one or seen one in person, but out of the current production models, i really like the look of the ZT3. My only concern is that since they're so rare and unique, if you happen to need repairs or replacement parts, it might be a pain. Just with strings itself, you'd have to order them online as most stores won't carry them.
#10
The first guy I saw with a Steinberger was Warren Cuccurullo when he was in Missing Persons. Missing Persons was a New Wave comprised of 4 musicians who were all members of Frank Zappa's band (Pre-Vai)...and Zappa didn't hire bad musicians. Given what Zappa demanded, Warren's guitar had to be pretty flexible.

I have had a Steinberger on my GAS list for years (decades) now, and gotten to handle them a few times. The older ones were better made, overall, but the Synapse line (of which the TranScales are a member) are generally well put together. About the only thing keeping me from buying one is that I'm not a fan of EMGs.*


* yeah, I could swap 'em out, and I may just...down the road.
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Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Jun 5, 2012,