#1
I've been playing for about 8 years, and I took lessons myself for 2 years and i've been teaching myself ever since. I do a fair amount on both acoustic and electric, and can play both equally. I recently agreed to teach my friend to play - nothing major, just the basics and a few songs, so that then she can learn tabs like I did. She knows a few basic chords and nothing more. I thought it would be no problem since I thought I remembered what my teacher had tought me - but I forgot. Can you guys recommend any place that would offer some good starting points? I've done google searching but all I can find is how to start a guitar teaching business.
Thanks for your time
Gibson LP studio premium plus
Epiphone LP Custom
Fender Mexi Strat
Jasmine acoustic-electric
69 Fender Twin Reverb (silverface)
Korg AX3000G
#2
Basic open chords, easy songs that use those chords, scales (major, minor, and pentatonics), barre chords.

In that order.
#3
Quote by ttreat31
Basic open chords, easy songs that use those chords, scales (major, minor, and pentatonics), barre chords.

In that order.


I'd switch the order of the last two. There's a huge, huge difference between learning to strum and learning play something that makes sense within a scale. It's one thing to learn some basic riffs (which you could mix in at any point) but to me the only point in learning a scale is to learn to solo/improvise on your own which takes plenty of time and practice to even have the coordination to do so. I say that because I'm teaching my roommate to play and it's frustrating because it really is a very slow process.
#4
Quote by JHogg11
I'd switch the order of the last two. There's a huge, huge difference between learning to strum and learning play something that makes sense within a scale. It's one thing to learn some basic riffs (which you could mix in at any point) but to me the only point in learning a scale is to learn to solo/improvise on your own which takes plenty of time and practice to even have the coordination to do so. I say that because I'm teaching my roommate to play and it's frustrating because it really is a very slow process.


True, but I was taking into account finger strength. I remember when I first started, barre chords seemed impossible.
#5
Teach her to read tab, and give her UG's URL. Just make sure she stays out of The Pit unless she enjoys long, thoughtful discussions about masturbation.

Open chords and strum patterns are always a good start. Find out what kind of music she enjoys and teach her some standards of that genre (IE; if she likes metal, start her out on powerchord progressions. If it's country, maybe open chords with small easy licks/riffs thrown in that she could handle, etc.). Make sure you're appealing to what interests her about the guitar, and the rest will come, especially since you already know your stuff. She'll be able to use you more as a guide then a teacher.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
#6
Hey, thanks a lot guys! This really helped. I decided to search instead for how to learn guitar... why didn't I think of that? Anyway, what you guys said directly parallels what I found on the internet. Thanks again!
Gibson LP studio premium plus
Epiphone LP Custom
Fender Mexi Strat
Jasmine acoustic-electric
69 Fender Twin Reverb (silverface)
Korg AX3000G
#7
The first thing to teach her should be how to tune her guitar, nothing will sound right if you're not in tune. From there, teach her how to read tablature.
Then just start simple and work up: Easy riffs using just one or two strings, simple open chords, major scales, minor scales, basic arpeggios, more complicated riffs, barre chords etc.
All the while instructing her on proper posture and positioning of the fretting hand and strumming hand etc.

2 things I wished i had learned earlier would be:

Playing with a pick as well as fingers. I found using a pick uncomfortable and steered away from it for the best part of a year as a beginner. I wish someone would have told me better.
Same goes for alternate tunings. I wish someone had introduced me to alternate tunings far earlier.
Last edited by tom183 at Jun 1, 2008,
#8
Scales are for more then just learning to solo/improvise. If you think they are only for that then you might need to learn more. Playing scales can help your finger dexterity. Scales can be used to demonstrate different techniques also. Adding a few slurs in a scale line and understanding scales in general is a good thing whether you plan to solo/improvise or not.
#9
Quote by Nacho Cheese!
Scales are for more then just learning to solo/improvise. If you think they are only for that then you might need to learn more. Playing scales can help your finger dexterity. Scales can be used to demonstrate different techniques also. Adding a few slurs in a scale line and understanding scales in general is a good thing whether you plan to solo/improvise or not.

+1
It's great finger exercise, plus having solid scale knowledge makes it easier to play along when someone else solos.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play