#1
there's nothing wrong with playing scales, as long as that's not the only thing you're trying to learn. Along with the scales, learn how to break out of each box shape for that particular scale and move seamlessly into the next. That's the real trick to being able to play lead, besides hitting all the notes precisely.

going into each box shape. Like from key to key?
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#2
No, he means going from pattern to pattern so you can access different notes in different ways. Your still in the same key, your just using a different form of the same scale. Or at least thats what Im gonna guess

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#3
For example, the relative major pentatonic scale to the A minor pentatonic scale is C, so if you're playing in A minor pentatonic, any notes you play in C major pentatonic will work as well because they're the same notes in a different octave. To find the relative scale between a minor pentatonic and a major pentatonic, it's a whole and a half step.
Last edited by ttreat31 at May 30, 2008,
#4
Quote by ttreat31
For example, the relative major pentatonic scale to the A minor pentatonic scale is C, so if you're playing in A minor pentatonic, any notes you play in C major pentatonic will work as well because they're the same notes in a different octave. To find the relative scale between a minor pentatonic and a major pentatonic, it's a whole and a half step.

That's not what it meant at all, to be honest that's just confusing matters anyway as it's not technically right.

TS, he means that you need to learn what scales actually are as opposed to only learning some of the patterns they form on the fretboard. If you put too much emphasis on the patterns and boxes you won't really understand the scale and you'll struggle to move away from those boxes.

The trick is to make sure you understand what's going on musically, that's what scales are actually about, notes and intervals. Where you play them on the guitar is just incidental, it's a means to an end and you don't actually have to learn it at all. If you learn the notes on the fretboard and learn the scale formulas then you learn those patterns by default.
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