#1
If you've heard of this, you probably know that it's got a built in 4 track recorder. I wanted to use this to record some stuff I wrote myself, but using the sound from my amp, not the BR's built in effects. The problem is, when I plug my guitar into the input, then plug the output from the BR into my amp, I have to turn down the input level because the "over" button flashes meaning it's too loud for the BR which, because tube amps sound a lot better turned up, makes my sound a bit crappy. Is there any way around this apart from using the built in mic? I prefer to plug my guitar straight into the machine since you can hear the pick scraping noise if using the mic. Thanks.
#2
Plug your guitar into your amp and then go from your amps output into the br's input. Should be fine.
#3
Quote by guitarace99
Plug your guitar into your amp and then go from your amps output into the br's input. Should be fine.


My amp's output? What do you mean ?
#4
if you have a line/phones/ or record out on the amp run that to the BR recorder but DONT run any speaker outputs to it.

if you don't have any usable outputs I have heard running an external mic with this recorder doesn't work well at all so its probably best if you could upgrade your recorder to something like the BR600.
#5
Quote by moody07747
if you have a line/phones/ or record out on the amp run that to the BR recorder but DONT run any speaker outputs to it.

if you don't have any usable outputs I have heard running an external mic with this recorder doesn't work well at all so its probably best if you could upgrade your recorder to something like the BR600.


I have a Laney VC15 which doesn't have any of those. I don't have any money at the moment :/ any other suggestions ?
#6
You could plug the guitar into FX pedal and from the pedal into the BR's input.

Or, try again using the built in mic, which is fair quality. Move further from the mic and decrease gain to get less pick noise.
There is poetry in despair.
#7
Quote by fridge_raider
You could plug the guitar into FX pedal and from the pedal into the BR's input.

Or, try again using the built in mic, which is fair quality. Move further from the mic and decrease gain to get less pick noise.


Okay, so if i used the built in mic, how far should i have it away from the amp? Because if it's too close to the speaker wont sound really crappy?
#8
Experiment. I wouldn't put it really close with the volume up too loud though.
There is poetry in despair.
#9
Ok, first of all, you need to remember the Micro BR is a digital recorder. The sound you get from you tube amp does not reflect the sound you’ll get from your recording. If that’s your issue, then maybe you should record with headphones so you know exactly what the tone is going sound like. Unless you have an effects loop, you’re going to be putting your guitar through two separate pre-amps - thus making tone hunting a little pointless.

I’ve been wanting to capture my “tube amp sound” for awhile with my Micro BR, but I’m afraid it’s not very easy. The built in-microphone is no way as durable as, say an SM57, and it’s not as inviting to all its frequencies. You wouldn't be able to place the Micro BR mic as close as you're supposed to put a mic when your mic'ing an amp. The options I would be looking into are…

1) Buy a decent microphone (like the SM57), find a cheap mic preamp and run that through the guitar input of your Micro BR. You can’t directly plug the mic into the guitar input because it needs a preamp to match the volume your guitar outputs - saves it sounding terrible, basically.

2) Buy a decent microphone and find some other way of recording. This is what I’m doing, I’d like a little more versatility so I’m going to get myself a firewire based guitar/mic input system for my PC, recording in a program like Cubase or Audacity.

3) Give up trying to capture your amp tone, and perfect your digital tone.

Hope that helps
Last edited by Tomaz24 at May 31, 2008,
#10
Quote by Tomaz24
Ok, first of all, you need to remember the Micro BR is a digital recorder. The sound you get from you tube amp does not reflect the sound you’ll get from your recording. If that’s your issue, then maybe you should record with headphones so you know exactly what the tone is going sound like. Unless you have an effects loop, you’re going to be putting your guitar through two separate pre-amps - thus making tone hunting a little pointless.
I’ve been wanting to capture my “tube amp sound” for awhile with my Micro BR, but I’m afraid it’s not very easy. The built in-microphone is no way as durable as, say an SM57, and it’s not as inviting to all its frequencies. You wouldn't be able to place the Micro BR mic as close as you're supposed to put a mic when your mic'ing an amp. The options I would be looking into are…

1) Buy a decent microphone (like the SM57), find a cheap mic preamp and run that through the guitar input of your Micro BR. You can’t directly plug the mic into the guitar input because it needs a preamp to match the volume your guitar outputs - saves it sounding terrible, basically.

2) Buy a decent microphone and find some other way of recording. This is what I’m doing, I’d like a little more versatility so I’m going to get myself a firewire based guitar/mic input system for my PC, recording in a program like Cubase or Audacity.

3) Give up trying to capture your amp tone, and perfect your digital tone.

Hope that helps


My amp does have an effects loop. Can I use that somehow? All I want is my amp sound recorded, without pick noise. I cant stand too far away from the mic since my room is kind of small.
#12
Quote by doubtfull
My amp does have an effects loop. Can I use that somehow? All I want is my amp sound recorded, without pick noise. I cant stand too far away from the mic since my room is kind of small.


Well then it's going to be very difficult for you. That mic was designed for acoustics and vocals (apparently) so it'll be tough. You can line-out your amp, into your Micro BR (you'll need headphones or another amp to hear what's coming out of the Micro BR) but that won't sound "tube-like" because it'll just be the digital signal. I've tried that before and it's alright. ish.
#13
I just got a BR600 (still in learning mode) but the following web site has really helped me out.

http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/BossBr/

They (of course) also talk to the MicroBR - as it is a all things BR (not BS) site. It is quite amazing all the stuff these things can do, and their are many helpful people there. Good Luck!
#14
^ continued ... BTW ... I just recorded my tube amp yesturday simply using headphones and on-board mics for the first time (BR600.) I had a basic drum beat going from the BR to help me keep time when recording...also made sure all the effects were off (just wanted the sound of my amp!!!)

I Placed the little recorder on a chair about 4' from cabinet and set the levels to near peak to avoid clipping. And from there just jamed and recorded.

I am actually impressed with the quality the on-board mic's provided - even though I am still testing different setups.

BTW...I could hear pick noises when I walked to close to the recorder and it gave kind of a "panning"effect as I walked by the onboard mics...LOL.

What you need to do is have a long headphone cable crank your amp, set you levels (Test, test) and you should be able to find a sweet spot and not hear pick noises.

Peace.