#1
i usually wouldn't ask this, but this has me stumped.

Amin, Emaj, Amin,F,Dsus2,Dsus4

played with capo on 3rd fret.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#2
A minor and A Harmonic minor over the E
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#3
when you say over the E, do you mean while i just play the Emaj or while i do the whole progression?
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#4
You could do it over all of it if you want, but it's definitely a good idea over the Emaj
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#5
Quote by aradine
i usually wouldn't ask this, but this has me stumped.

Amin, Emaj, Amin,F,Dsus2,Dsus4

played with capo on 3rd fret.
It fits perfectly with harmonic minor, except dont play the harmonic minors leading tone (The G#) over that last chord, as It clashes badly (IMO).

The A harmonic minor scale will function as a E phrygian dominant over the E major, an F lydian #2 over the F and D dorian over the two D chords. The #3 might sound a little too bluesy for that progression so I would suggest not playing the G# note over that. Minor thirds over major chords always sound bluesy.
#6
Quote by demonofthenight
except dont play the harmonic minors leading tone (The G#) over that last chord, as It clashes badly (IMO).
.


I agree. Cos it's a tritone you'll get a lot of tension there. But if you want to create some harmonic tension then you could use it I guess. Then resolve to A again.
#7
Quote by mdc
I agree. Cos it's a tritone you'll get a lot of tension there. But if you want to create some harmonic tension then you could use it I guess. Then resolve to A again.
Actually, its only because I hate b9 harmonic intervals. The G# makes a b9 with the G of the Dsus4 chord. It's not because of the tritone.

Tritones have tension, but its a nice sort of tension. Its a tritone that gives the X7 chord its tension. Theres a tritone between its 3rd and seventh notes.
#8
Quote by demonofthenight


Tritones have tension, but its a nice sort of tension. Its a tritone that gives the X7 chord its tension.


Tension tension tension, its all about the tension......nice = ]
#9
Quote by mdc
Tension tension tension, its all about the tension......nice = ]
But I personally (actually most composers do) hate harmonic b9 intervals. They sound muddy and yuck and sounds like a duck dying of castration.

The only time b9 intervals are okay is when its a b9 with the perfect fifth of the chord, but thats only cause the perfect fifth doesnt really matter. If you omit the perfect fifth from chords, not many people would notice
#10
Quote by demonofthenight
a duck dying of castration.
Not that I can relate, but that sounds unpleasant.


Aradine, if your progression went Am Em Am F Dsus2 Dsus4, it would be easy easy easy. Everything fits nicely in the key of Am and A is clearly the root. However, most composers, yourself included, prefer using a major V chord in a minor key, so you're played E rather than Em. This chord contains G#, the major seventh of Am. This note comes from the A harmonic or melodic minor scale, and the A harmonic minor scale is typically played over that E chord. However, the natural minor scale is usually played over the rest of the chords as to not have a awkward tone (G#) played over the other chords.
#11
Quote by demonofthenight

The only time b9 intervals are okay is when its a b9 with the perfect fifth of the chord, but thats only cause the perfect fifth doesnt really matter. If you omit the perfect fifth from chords, not many people would notice


Unless you have a ridiculously good ear. It has such a strong relationship that it can often be heard as an extension of the root anyway.

Are flat 9's your favourite type of chords!? lol! I prefer 69's myself.
#12
Quote by mdc
I prefer 69's myself.
I laughed the first time I saw a 6/9 chord, I won't lie.

And none of us addressed the fact that you've got a capo at fret 3. Assuming you're playing standard voicings of the chords, then everything is moved up 3 half steps to C minor/harmonic minor.
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I laughed the first time I saw a 6/9 chord, I won't lie.


I have lots of 6/9 chords in my songs ; )

Seriously though, I like jazz, playing it more than listening.
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Just to clarify, E6/9 is E G# B C# F#, or is there a 7th in there as well?

That's correct. There's no seventh, just the sixth and the ninth added.
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Just to clarify, E6/9 is E G# B C# F#, or is there a 7th in there as well?


No 7th. I usually play them without the 5th as well. Like this

-x
-7
-6
-6
-7
-x
#17
Quote by mdc
Are flat 9's your favourite type of chords!? lol! I prefer 69's myself.
Gotta love the sound of ducks dying of castration

To get even more off-topic, anyone hear that harmony in fifths was banned for some time because it de-individualised the instruments or sounded the same or something?
#18
Quote by demonofthenight
It fits perfectly with harmonic minor, except dont play the harmonic minors leading tone (The G#) over that last chord, as It clashes badly (IMO).

The A harmonic minor scale will function as a E phrygian dominant over the E major, an F lydian #2 over the F and D dorian over the two D chords. The #3 might sound a little too bluesy for that progression so I would suggest not playing the G# note over that. Minor thirds over major chords always sound bluesy.


I disagree with this. The notes will certainly sound different over different chords, but they will still be heard as they relate to the tonic. You are not switching between relative modes over each chord.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#19
Quote by Archeo Avis
I disagree with this. The notes will certainly sound different over different chords, but they will still be heard as they relate to the tonic. You are not switching between relative modes over each chord.
You do have to consider how each note functions over the backing chord, however.
#20
^If the chord progression was slow moving or even stationary (so hanging on a chord at some point), you'd have more time to solo and the sound of the modes would come out more when using the A Harmonic minor.
#21
Quote by mdc
^If the chord progression was slow moving or even stationary (so hanging on a chord at some point), you'd have more time to solo and the sound of the modes would come out more when using the A Harmonic minor.


Even then, you'd have to give each chord enough emphasis to create a new tonal center every time the chord changed.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#22
it's sort of a fast progression, so i need something that will fit over the whole song.

thanks alot guys, specially BGC who picked up on the capo, or else i wouldn't have adjusted accordingly.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#23
Even then, you'd have to give each chord enough emphasis to create a new tonal center every time the chord changed.
You don't have to change the tonal centre, but you do have to emphasize the chord in the melody.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#24
If it's moving fast, just play A minor for the most part and use G#s over the E chord.

(or capoed at the third fret, C minor and use B naturals over the "E"(really G) chord)
#25
Quote by Ænimus Prime
You don't have to change the tonal centre, but you do have to emphasize the chord in the melody.


Which still wouldn't change the mode every time the chord changed.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#26
The notes will certainly sound different over different chords
Why do think this is so? I put it down to the notes interacting with the chord, and forming the intervals of a particular mode.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#27
Quote by Ænimus Prime
Why do think this is so? I put it down to the notes interacting with the chord, and forming the intervals of a particular mode.


They interact with the chord, but they still relate to the tonic. Unless you're creating a new tonal center over every chord, you're not switching modes.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#28
They interact with the chord
How do you describe this interaction?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#29
Quote by Ænimus Prime
How do you describe this interaction?


The harmony between the notes of the chord and the notes of the melody, which still doesn't create a new tonal center every time the chord changes.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#30
The harmony between the notes of the chord and the notes of the melody
So if I'm in A minor and I play B over the F chord, how would you describe this harmony? I would describe it as a #11, which gives a lydian sound.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#31
Quote by Ænimus Prime
So if I'm in A minor and I play B over the F chord, how would you describe this harmony? I would describe it as a #11, which gives a lydian sound.


Your tonal center is A, and the notes are going to be heard as they relate to A. The notes will have their own unique consonances and dissonances over each chord in the progression, but they're not changing function just because the chord changes.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#32
Quote by Archeo Avis
Your tonal center is A, and the notes are going to be heard as they relate to A. The notes will have their own unique consonances and dissonances over each chord in the progression, but they're not changing function just because the chord changes.


So what if you played AM for one measure, then E7 for 15 measures, then resolved back to AM. What would you be playing over the E7?
#33
So does C function as the fifth of the F chord, or the third of the key, or both?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#34
^IMO, the former.

To say a note sounds the same no matter what chord is being played is immature.

To archeo
Why do you think the melody ALWAYS relates to the tonal center of the chord progression of the piece? Because its simpler? Well the earth being the center of the universe is a simpler theory than a near infinite if not infinite universe.
What if the tonal center is only introduced at the cadence? Do we get a pime taradox? What about non-diatonic chords, like that E7?

Sure its HEAPS harder to think in chords, but over slow progressions like some jazz and some metal songs (allthough the beat is fast, the progresion is slow) this is very possible and should be explored.