#1
im thinking of getting a nylon stirnged guitar
but im left handed.

can anyone suggest some cheap but decent classical guitars with a cut away?
it would help if you knew whther they were left handed but thats not so important, i can do that research myself if needs be
#2
why dont you just get a classical guitar w/out a cutaway and then reverse the strings? im jw if the cutaway is a major deal here.
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#3
because id also need to reverse the bridge and the nut wouldn't i?
the cutaway is preferable.
i play quite alot of stuff up there
#4
Quote by Black-Metal
because id also need to reverse the bridge and the nut wouldn't i?
the cutaway is preferable.
i play quite alot of stuff up there


Below is a quote from frets.com. Swapping a classical righty to a lefty is easier than you think. Read on.

"If this were a classical guitar, with no saddle compensation angle, the conversion would be almost trivial. In fact, many classical guitars have wide enough slots in their nuts to allow reverse stringing with no modification at all. A mandolin or archtop jazz guitar would require a new lefty compensated bridge. A four string banjo needs only a new nut because its bridge can be reversed, while a five string banjo can't be converted at all for obvious reasons."

Plus, most classicals don't have pickguards, so the guitar would look normal restrung to a lefty. The cutaway bit is of course another problem in itself. Unless you're adamant about having a cutaway, there's quite a few options open to you.