#1
Hey, i wanna start building pedals from schematics.
and im not skilled at reading schemaics,
However i found a very simple one and was wondering if someone could explain the schematic to me and how to build it. http://www.home-wrecker.com/bazz1.png
thanks
Quote by letsgocoyote
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#6
Quote by jimRH7


Nicely done!

I'd only make a couple of very minor additions.

The battery symbol is supposed to have one short and one long bar for each cell, however, people pretty much stopped following that convention a long time ago. Now, they just use as many sets of long/short bars as they want. The long bar almost always represents the positive side, and the short bar almost always represents the negative side. In this particular circuit, the symbol represents a single 9V battery (which actually has six cells inside it). The guy who draw the schematic just chose to use a three cell symbol to represent it.

While it's true that the two jacks represented for the input and output are commonly used for stereo and mono, they are often used for other reasons. In this case, the input jack is a stereo-type jack, but it's supposed to be used with a mono-type plug. The extra connection which would normally go to the ring on a stereo plug ends up being shorted to the sleeve on a mono plug. This forms a switch for the negative side of the battery, so that the circuit will only draw current when there's a plug in the input jack. In this case, it would be more appropriate to call it a "tip/ring/sleeve" or "TRS" jack. The output is a "tip/sleeve" or "TS" jack.

Little_Buster, he explains how to build it here:

http://www.home-wrecker.com/bazz.html

Was there something on that page you didn't quite understand, or had questions about?
#7
Quote by amp_surgeon
Nicely done!

I'd only make a couple of very minor additions.

The battery symbol is supposed to have one short and one long bar for each cell, however, people pretty much stopped following that convention a long time ago. Now, they just use as many sets of long/short bars as they want. The long bar almost always represents the positive side, and the short bar almost always represents the negative side. In this particular circuit, the symbol represents a single 9V battery (which actually has six cells inside it). The guy who draw the schematic just chose to use a three cell symbol to represent it.

While it's true that the two jacks represented for the input and output are commonly used for stereo and mono, they are often used for other reasons. In this case, the input jack is a stereo-type jack, but it's supposed to be used with a mono-type plug. The extra connection which would normally go to the ring on a stereo plug ends up being shorted to the sleeve on a mono plug. This forms a switch for the negative side of the battery, so that the circuit will only draw current when there's a plug in the input jack. In this case, it would be more appropriate to call it a "tip/ring/sleeve" or "TRS" jack. The output is a "tip/sleeve" or "TS" jack.

Little_Buster, he explains how to build it here:

http://www.home-wrecker.com/bazz.html

Was there something on that page you didn't quite understand, or had questions about?


Thanks man, I thought there was something dodjy going on, having the battery going straight into the jack! I didn't know it was that simple - i thought the jacks had to be a special type to get it to turn off when it was unplugged.
#8
Quote by jimRH7
Thanks man, I thought there was something dodjy going on, having the battery going straight into the jack! I didn't know it was that simple - i thought the jacks had to be a special type to get it to turn off when it was unplugged.


You're welcome!

There are jacks that have switches built into them, but on most of these the switches will open when a plug is inserted - the plug pushes the switch's leaf contacts apart. This is the opposite of what the designer's wanted to happen with the power circuit - they wanted the switch to close when the plug was inserted. The TRS jack wasn't really designed for this, but ends up being a convenient and elegant solution. Pedal designers have been using this approach since the 1960's. I don't know who originally came up with it, but it's ingenious!

There are uses for those other types of jacks with the switches built in for guitar circuits. They are frequently used for the effects loop jacks. The switches on the two jacks are tied together so that the effects loop is bypassed when there are no plugs in the jacks.