#1
so my band has our first gig july 13th, just wondering other than practicing a hell of a lot what should we be doing is there any specifics we should be covering other than musicianship?
#4
Well for a first gig the main idea is not to over-do it and just **** up and look like idiots, so just work on looking into the crowd, walking around on stage and just looking relaxed, nobody likes watching a show where the band looks like statues, so just move around and relax and enjoy it.
#5
a big one is too simply look at the audience. make eye contact with them. you should be able to look at them through the whole song. if you can't do that then you're probably not ready to gig yet. and show emotion, too. even if you do make eye contact, people want to see that you're having fun. smile, move around a bit. the bands that do that are more fun to watch than the ones who just stand motionless
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#6
Quote by zachrudicel93
thts weird...my band has our 1st june 13th...



are you in the same band?
STEAM: beachhhhhhhh

Quote by cornmancer
Please daddy, just for one hour.
#8
oh yeah!! hahahaha i didnt read it properly
STEAM: beachhhhhhhh

Quote by cornmancer
Please daddy, just for one hour.
#9
Be polite to the gig organisers and any other bands on the bill and especialy the sound engineer (it's generaly regarded as tradition to buy the guy a beer) and be punctual.
Set up your gear efficiently and with minimum fuss. It's probably a good idea to practice stripping down and setting up your gear, and for you all to learn how to set up the drum kit because that always takes the longest, so once everyone has set up their guitar amps, you can all help the drummer set up his gear.
Try not to play over your alloted time because this can cause problems for the gig organiser if he has other bands following you on.
When on stage, try to relax. This is your first gig, so before you play anything, tell the audience that it is your first gig, that way no one will be expecting you to be brilliant, but if you do happen to be very good, they will show their appreciation that bit more.
I advise you to do this purely as a way to take some of the pressure off you on your first gig, not to use as an excuse.
Remember, all you need to do is repeat what you do in rehearsals, it makes little difference how many people are watching you, whether it's a couple of your mates watching you practice or a stadium full of thousands of people, it's exactly the same thing because you play your instruments in exactly the same way.
Above all else, try to enjoy yourself, and show that you are enjoying yourself.
It's not essential to be doing backflips or any other silly manuveres, but as long as you look like you're enjoying yourself, and not like you're terrified or even bored of what you are playing, that will be more than enough.
Finaly, as soon as you are done and the crowd have stopped applauding you, if there is another band following you, strip your gear down and remove it from the stage with that same efficiently and with minimum fuss as you set it up, only quicker.

Good luck (not that you should need it) and have a good 'un!
#10
Slacker with his awesome knowledge of everything gig-like...

STEAM: beachhhhhhhh

Quote by cornmancer
Please daddy, just for one hour.
#12
make sure your amps are on, don't drop your guitar, don't make it so the bass drum is the loudest, and don't jump around unless the entire band is doing it.
don't drink and drive, smoke and fly. actually, do both, if that's what you want. i won't care.
#13
Quote by Retro Rocker
Fixed that for you.



...?
STEAM: beachhhhhhhh

Quote by cornmancer
Please daddy, just for one hour.
#15
Don't forget any equipment.
I was once heavily prominent on these forums from 2004-2007, let's see how long I can stay now that I'm back.
#16
This is your first gig, so before you play anything, tell the audience that it is your first gig, that way no one will be expecting you to be brilliant, but if you do happen to be very good, they will show their appreciation that bit more.


I disagree with this. What reason does the audience have to listen to your music if you start making excuses for you substandard performance? Even if it's your first gig, you should be comfortable enough playing the songs that it doesn't become an issue. The fact that you have never gigged before shouldn't factor into it at all, and you certainly shouldn't go around making the audience aware of the fact that you have no experience.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#17
Quote by Archeo Avis
I disagree with this. What reason does the audience have to listen to your music if you start making excuses for you substandard performance? Even if it's your first gig, you should be comfortable enough playing the songs that it doesn't become an issue. The fact that you have never gigged before shouldn't factor into it at all, and you certainly shouldn't go around making the audience aware of the fact that you have no experience.

Possibly you didn't read the next line, I'll repeat it just for you.

Quote by SlackerBabbath
I advise you to do this purely as a way to take some of the pressure off you on your first gig, not to use as an excuse.


Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jun 2, 2008,
#18
move around alot...this saturday im playing metalfest and need to get back into dancing on stage. but movement makes for a much better show
#19
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Be polite to the gig organisers and any other bands on the bill and especialy the sound engineer (it's generaly regarded as tradition to buy the guy a beer) and be punctual.
Set up your gear efficiently and with minimum fuss. It's probably a good idea to practice stripping down and setting up your gear, and for you all to learn how to set up the drum kit because that always takes the longest, so once everyone has set up their guitar amps, you can all help the drummer set up his gear.
Try not to play over your alloted time because this can cause problems for the gig organiser if he has other bands following you on.
When on stage, try to relax. This is your first gig, so before you play anything, tell the audience that it is your first gig, that way no one will be expecting you to be brilliant, but if you do happen to be very good, they will show their appreciation that bit more.
I advise you to do this purely as a way to take some of the pressure off you on your first gig, not to use as an excuse.
Remember, all you need to do is repeat what you do in rehearsals, it makes little difference how many people are watching you, whether it's a couple of your mates watching you practice or a stadium full of thousands of people, it's exactly the same thing because you play your instruments in exactly the same way.
Above all else, try to enjoy yourself, and show that you are enjoying yourself.
It's not essential to be doing backflips or any other silly manuveres, but as long as you look like you're enjoying yourself, and not like you're terrified or even bored of what you are playing, that will be more than enough.
Finaly, as soon as you are done and the crowd have stopped applauding you, if there is another band following you, strip your gear down and remove it from the stage with that same efficiently and with minimum fuss as you set it up, only quicker.

Good luck (not that you should need it) and have a good 'un!


Who buys the sound guy a beer? I've never heard that before, sounds quite stupid that you also say it's regarded as tradition to buy him one. The guy usually gets free beer from the bar to begin with. So I say nay nay to buying the sound guy a beer.
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#20
Quote by CNC-Digity
Who buys the sound guy a beer? I've never heard that before, sounds quite stupid that you also say it's regarded as tradition to buy him one. The guy usually gets free beer from the bar to begin with. So I say nay nay to buying the sound guy a beer.

There's no harm in buying him one if he does a good job.
Even if it's something you could've done without him, it's just a bit of common courtesy.
#21
Quote by CNC-Digity
Who buys the sound guy a beer? I've never heard that before, sounds quite stupid that you also say it's regarded as tradition to buy him one. The guy usually gets free beer from the bar to begin with. So I say nay nay to buying the sound guy a beer.

You never heard of it? Really? Hmmmm, I always assumed it was something that was fairly universal among experienced gigging musicians, because practicaly every experienced gigging musician I know does it, but maybe it's just a British thing. (Or maybe it's just a Canadian thing to be a tightwad when buying a round of beers. )
I must add however that it's only usualy done when it's a sound engineer you don't normaly work with, like a venue's 'in house' sound engineer for instance.
It's kinda like a friendly bribe, to sorta say, 'Here's a beer, now could you please make sure we have a good sound tonight.'

What's this 'free beer from the bar' for the sound engineer that you speak of? I've heard of bands getting their rider that way but in my experience, most promoters usualy give it to them in a crate in the dressing room so that it limits just how much free beer a band gets, but I've never heard of a promoter organising free beer for the mixer guy, they usualy just get money.

Just out of interest, (to find out how far the tradition has spread) has anyone else here heard of buying the sound engineer a beer before a gig?
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jun 3, 2008,
#22
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Possibly you didn't read the next line, I'll repeat it just for you.




In which case mentioning it at all is pointless, and doesn't give the audience any reason to listen to you.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#24
Quote by zachrudicel93
thts weird...my band has our 1st june 13th...

I'm just wondering would that be the Friday the 13th thing out in Waco?
#25
Quote by Archeo Avis
In which case mentioning it at all is pointless, and doesn't give the audience any reason to listen to you.

Possibly you missed something in that line again, I'll just try repeating it..... again.
Quote by SlackerBabbath

I advise you to do this purely as a way to take some of the pressure off you on your first gig, not to use as an excuse.
#26
As a member of audiences, I would definitely rather a band did not announce this at the beginning of a set.

Regardless of the intent and how it actually made them feel, I, as an audience member, would definitely feel that the band were setting up a get-out clause for themselves, as well as virtually asking me to have lower expectations of them. However, if a band came out, said hello, launched into the set and played well and then after the set (or a significant way through) said, "Oh by the way, this is our first gig", I'd be very, very impressed. Both that they were able to rock well first time out and that they didn't feel like they needed the crutch of being percieved as first-timers who therefore might mess up.
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

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Last edited by Damascus at Jun 4, 2008,
#27
Remember to have spares ready: things like strings, picks, cables, batteries.
First gig the band i'm in did, i had no spare strings and one pick. The next practise we had, one of the strings snapped in the first song. I lucked out. Don't be as stupid as i was!

Also, just do what you feel like doing in terms of running about, but try not to remain stationary throughout. Don't try and activly think "i've got to move about", just go with the flow!
Look, red text
Last edited by Generic User at Jun 4, 2008,
#28
Make sure your instrument is tuned, since this is your first time you might start focusing with the crowd that you would forget to tune, enjoy the music.
If you have it , techniques come by practice .. but it's not about techniques........ it's about choosing the right notes
#29
Quote by Damascus
As a member of audiences, I would definitely rather a band did not announce this at the beginning of a set.

Regardless of the intent and how it actually made them feel, I, as an audience member, would definitely feel that the band were setting up a get-out clause for themselves, as well as virtually asking me to have lower expectations of them. However, if a band came out, said hello, launched into the set and played well and then after the set (or a significant way through) said, "Oh by the way, this is our first gig", I'd be very, very impressed. Both that they were able to rock well first time out and that they didn't feel like they needed the crutch of being percieved as first-timers who therefore might mess up.

And you are perfectly entitled to your opinion as is Archeo Avis.
I however have a different opinion, based on spending several years as a promoter and agent. I can see the advantage to both band and audience of announcing a band's first gig. But I'd never advise a band to do so if I thought they couldn't back it up with a damn good set.
#30
Quote by SlackerBabbath
And you are perfectly entitled to your opinion as is Archeo Avis.
I however have a different opinion, based on spending several years as a promoter and agent. I can see the advantage to both band and audience of announcing a band's first gig. But I'd never advise a band to do so if I thought they couldn't back it up with a damn good set.


That's all I was offering .

I figured that the TS could do with as many opinions as he could read.
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
#31
I agree with everyone who says dont stay stationary. Under any circumstances
Have a few practices focusing on stage presence. Get the singer to talk to the crowd between songs (but as long as it isnt stupid and long). The guitarists/bassist should be energetic and not hide behind their guitars. Jump if you can.
And LEARN YOUR SONGS WITHOUT LOOKING AT YOUR Guitar.
have a few practices designated for this. If you cant get it at practice, there's no way you can do it at a show.
Quote by pengiunman
Hahaha you crack me up swansareroadkil.

:can't think of a smiley to put, your too cool:
#32
My first rreal gig was last friday (have had loads of experiance infront of crowds though), it was with a Rory Gallagher tribute band, anyway, I had people telling me "you'll be fine, the nerve's will go." etc etc, I didn't believe them, but when you get on that stage with everyone's eyes on you, you're fine.
Another thing, they're watching you, so they'll most likely enjoy you as they paid/wanted to see you.