#1
Which kind of guitar do you guys think would be most suitable to a player with larger hands? I'm kinda unhappy with the Stratocaster I have, it doesn't really give me alot of space to work with. I play mostly all genres of music but the guitar doesn't have to have a bone crunching metal tone, just a nice rock-edge.
#2
Have you ever considered a baritone or another form of long scale guitar?

The longer the scale, the bigger the distance between the frets, which might be what you're looking for.


Several brands make a few baritone models, so which one to pick would be down to your budget and preferences.
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#3
I'd like to know the advantages and disadvantages of a Baritone scale neck, any takers?
#4
from what i've tried personally gibson's 50s neck is larger and suitable for bigger hands.try some les pauls and SGs with that neck. ibanez has a slightly wider neck than fender so maybe that could work for u aswell.
#5
sorry i dont know know the pros/cons of a baritone neck

but have ever played D shaped necks? i hear they're more comfortable for large-handed people. as well as 50's profile (wide necks) and the wide fingerboards on Ibanez's might work for you.
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#6
^^Ibanez necks would probably be too thin for him.

A Les Paul (Epiphone, Gibson, Agile, etc.) might work.

As for the Baritone: It might solve your problems, they have bigger neck length and thickness. A downside is that you would normally tune it to D standard instead of E.
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#7
Quote by WillEaton
I'd like to know the advantages and disadvantages of a Baritone scale neck, any takers?



Well, a baritone is simply a longer neck. This longer neck makes it ideal for down tuning, mainly because the longer the neck, the higher the string tension.

One disadvantage would be that if you tune a baritone up to standard, the strings (depending on gauge, of course) will be fairly tight.

On the other hand, because the frets are farther apart, it will give you a bit more space to work with.


The problem with a Les Paul, which usually has a thicker neck, is that it has a short scale, which means the frets will be closer together than on a standard Strat.


Quote by Phill-Rock
^Ibanez necks would probably be too thin for him.

A Les Paul (Epiphone, Gibson, Agile, etc.) might work.

As for the Baritone: It might solve your problems, they have bigger neck length and thickness. A downside is that you would normally tune it to D standard instead of E.



The thickness of a neck doesn't matter that much; take Paul Gilbert or Steve Vai. They both have huge hands, yet they play on thin Ibanez necks.

On top of that, not every Les Paul shaped guitar has a really thick neck.


As a note, a baritone is usually tuned much lower than D (think around B standard).
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Last edited by Bonsaischaap at May 31, 2008,
#8
I've played a 335 before, and the D neck is pretty comfortable, I don't remember how much room those things have up high though.

Can I ask someone who does have big hands what they find best?
#9
Quote by WillEaton
I've played a 335 before, and the D neck is pretty comfortable, I don't remember how much room those things have up high though.

Can I ask someone who does have big hands what they find best?



My dad, who has pretty big hands, prefers the slim C profile neck of his Spalted maple Tele (thinner and longer than that of a Les Paul) over the necks on his other guitars.
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#10
Maybe the answer is to go into a store, and try out every single nice guitar they have all with different neck shapes and to buy the one I keep coming back too. We can talk about it all day but in the end If I don't plop down and test everything out than its no good.
#11
^That's always the best answer, if there's a good store that you have access to.
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#12
Quote by WillEaton
Which kind of guitar do you guys think would be most suitable to a player with larger hands? I'm kinda unhappy with the Stratocaster I have, it doesn't really give me alot of space to work with. I play mostly all genres of music but the guitar doesn't have to have a bone crunching metal tone, just a nice rock-edge.


Schecters get pegged as a "metal" guitar, but I've seen several players use it for anything from blues rock to hard rock to alternative. And those necks are like baseball bats. Ever think of trying one of them out?

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#13
Doesn't Fender make a "Players Strat" which has a 12" radius neck, instead of the normal 9.5"? Or does that dimension just make the neck thicker? I thought about trying one since I tend to have problems down at the nut with making each note of an arpeggio ring and not get muffled by the next finger. I am getting better at it, but a wider neck at the nut with a little more space between the strings would make it a whole lot easier.

I do have a flat top nylon stringed acoustic that I think has a wider neck, but I have not played it for a long time and I loaned it to a friend, so I can't go and check it out.