#1
I once borrowed my friend's guitar distortion and to me the distorted sound I got from it was good. I was thinking of buying my own distortion but I realized that there is also bass distortion. What I want to know is if there's any actual difference in the sound between bass distortion and guitar distortion. The sound that I want is a heavily distorted Death Metal-ish sound. I would buy bass distortion but after comparing the two bass distortion is ridiculously expensive compared to guitar distortion so I feel it is of the utmost importance that I know the difference in the sound.
I realized I was god when I prayed and saw that I was talking to myself.
#2
its not nessecary but it is tweaked to accomidate the lower frequencies of a bass, you will not hurt anything if thats what your asking, so if you like the sound you get with the guitar distortion then its fine to use, the bass distortion just cuts out some of the higher frequencies, which some people prefer not to have.
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#3
There is a difference (my bass player tried the same thing). Most sounded just okay, one sounded good. It's very hit or miss, and often we could only find one setting that sounded good. Bass specific distortions are designed for the basses lower range, and are much more versatile (they sound good on more than one setting). That's my experience, but if you find a guitar pedal you really like, hell, go for it!
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#5
The difference is that bass distortion pedals take into account bass frequencies, whether that be through blending or whatever. Guitar distortions actually take out these signals because they are not wanted in most cases for a guitar. If the bass doesn't have those bass and low-mid frequencies coming through, they won't cut through in a band. Once you get above around 300hz (probably lower) you're starting to compete with the guitar player for sonic space. Just get a bass distortion pedal. Oh, and you will get much bigger and less friendly rants from some other people on this forum about this very subject.
#6
^ ditto on the "less friendly" rants, haha.
Suhr Custom, Flaxwood Rautia or Grosh Tele thru
HBE Medicine Bawl Wah
Analogman BiComp
Texas Two Step OD
Fulltone Ultimate Octave/Fuzz
Boss CE-2
TC Nova Delay
SLO-100, 65 London or Bogner Shiva
Ask me about any of this stuff!
#7
Go to talkbass.com and ask this same question in the effects forum, the people here are way too biased.
Quote by thefitz
Interesting. It turns out that there are people on the forum who play an upright bass. I'll make a note of that.

*makes note*

*puts note on wall*

*stares at note for a minute*

*sits back down and resumes doing what I was doing*
#8
No, the people here have more real-life experience with playing in bands and using a lot of gear in a live/studio setting. Not just playing in their bedrooms.

Buy any pedal you want if you are after a specific sound and you find a pedal that will do it. However, if you want a distortion pedal that will dirty-up your sound AND still keep your bass sounding low like a bass "should" then you should buy a bass distortion pedal.

If you and a guitarist are playing at the same time, your bass will sound almost exactly the same if you are both using GUITAR pedals. Which means that people will hear the guitar and not you.
#9
bass pedals generally also are much less subtle when dishing out the effect. this is because the signal from a bass is simpler than a guitar signal -guitars often have chords etc. basses are often playing one note at a time, so more of the effect will sound better than on a guitar. Bass distortions, as well as dealing with the lower frequencies better give you more distortion than a guitar (correct me if i'm wrong, folks!). also, I think bass distortions are more likely to have a "blend" knob for mixing the distorted and clean signal???
#10
If the guitar distortion cuts out the low end signals then I could just increase the bass on my amp right?
I realized I was god when I prayed and saw that I was talking to myself.
#11
Quote by VengeanceIsMine
If the guitar distortion cuts out the low end signals then I could just increase the bass on my amp right?


Short answer no--in simplified terms that signal is never reaching your amp, so no amount of boosting at the amp level is going to help.
#12
Quote by jimRH7
bass pedals generally also are much less subtle when dishing out the effect. this is because the signal from a bass is simpler than a guitar signal -guitars often have chords etc. basses are often playing one note at a time, so more of the effect will sound better than on a guitar. Bass distortions, as well as dealing with the lower frequencies better give you more distortion than a guitar (correct me if i'm wrong, folks!). also, I think bass distortions are more likely to have a "blend" knob for mixing the distorted and clean signal???


Actually the harmonic overtones that come from a bass generally make it a more complicated signal. If you look at a guitar and bass on say audacity you can see the difference. Its not a good idea to use a guitar pedal on a bass because the actual wave form the note takes on is much different between the two. There are specific bass distortion pedals because guitar and bass are not the same. Also it may sound good by yourself but you will get lost completely in the mix if youre playing with a band.

Suck it up and pay the extra, in the long run you'll be much happier.
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