#1
I've seen a few threads in the past asking what chords go good with what scales and vice versa, then I will see responds listing the chords/scales.

I would really like to know how one knows? Can someone explain in detail with examples? This would help me greatly. Is it something the two share that I'm not seeing that make them go together well? Thank you!
#2
In diatonic scales there are 7 notes and 7 general chords that go with that scale, I'd explain but... I'm lazy.
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#3
Is it something the two share that I'm not seeing that make them go together well?
They share the same notes, it's that simple. For a more detailed explanation, read the music theory link in my signature.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#4
ok i'll start but i am only doing major

you start wi the major scale

you make it by counting tones W= whole tone H= half tone

a whole tone is 2 frets

a half tone is 1 fret

the formula to make the major scale is :

WWHWWWH

we will use C maj for simplicity. the bold is the scale

C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab A Bb B C
WWHWWWH

or
C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C
WWHWWWH

so the Cmaj scale is CDEFGABC

this is what is know as a diatonic scale. meaning there is 7 notes and each note must be a different letter. there are only 7 different letters but 19 notes in the cromatic scale

intervals

intervals represent a note. and define what is hapening to a note within a scale.

the intervals for the major scale are

CDEFGABC
1234567

when speaking in proper terms we would call these the following

C-1-perfect prime
D-2-major second
E-3-major third
F-4-perfect fourth
G-5-perfect fifth
A-6-major sixth
B-7-major seventh
C-8-perfect octave

and octave is the same note played 1 pitch(i think that is the right word) higher

sometime we augement (sharpen, #) or diminish (flatten, b or bb) various notes to make chords or fit the scale to a chord

C = perfect prime or diminshed second
C#/Db =augmented prime or minor second
D = major second or diminished third
D#/Eb = augmented second or minor third
E/Fb = major third or diminished fourth
E#/F = augmented third or perfect fourth
F#/Gb = augmented fourth or diminished fifth
G= perfect fifth or diminished sixth
G#/Ab = augmented fifth or minor sixth
A = major sixth or diminished seventh
A#/Bb = augmented sixth or minor seventh
B/Cb = major seventh or diminished octave
C = perfect octave or diminished ninth

these intervals continue over and over technically

you will notice the perfect intervals 1 4 5 8 are only flattened(b) once to become diminished where as the major intervals 2 3 6 7 are flattened(bb) twice to become diminished

there is a general rule that you do not double augment an interval. it is ok for a note such as F# to becaome aumented or sharpend to F## but we do not want it to be F###

general chords for a mojor progression are

Major(M) always capital when writing
minor(m) always lower case when writing
diminished(dim0) always lower and supposed to be followed by a degrese symbol but my comp can' do that


now for chords

this is how you form the simple triad chords we will be using staying wiht the key of C

Major intervals 1 3 5
minor intervals 1 b3 5
diminished 1 b3 b5

you must remember that when making a chord in the key of Cmajor only a C chord will use the C major scale. if you wanted Dmin for example you would need to forn the chord with the intervals listed above from the Dmaj scale, b3 giving it the minor tonality


to stay in key with Cmaj we must use the same notes as Cmaj in all our chords(for now cause we are just learning)

there is also a formula to stay in key in a major progression it is

Major minor minor Major Major minor diminished

so to stay in key we would use the chords

CMaj Dmin Emin Fmaj GMaj Amin Bdim0

so using these chords resolving back to Cmaj you would use the Cmaj scale

i hope that helps a little
song stuck in my head today


Last edited by lbc_sublime at Jun 1, 2008,
#5
Quote by Ænimus Prime
read the music theory link in my signature.



o no..... not you tooo
song stuck in my head today


Last edited by lbc_sublime at Jun 1, 2008,
#6
Hey, it's a good link and it's been in my sig for most of the time I've been registered here.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#7
Yeah look for simularities. After you become more familar with invertvals
and conceptions behind it, you come up with ways that'll work best
for your thinking or the way you process informations.

Some poeple see the arrow of the Fed-x sign...some don't.

anyway, If I see the W or full step as the last interval, it's a sign
to me that it might be a minor.

All minor chords/scales have 1 1/2 step to create a b3.
HW or WH combinations.
A process of elimination to for me to figure out maj .
Last edited by Ordinary at Jun 1, 2008,