#1
i'm kinda cofused about the use of scales.
when i play for example a C chord , can i only play in the C scale?
and if it changes a lot should i keep switching between the scales?

and for e.g. wich scales should i use over these chords?
E---7----5----3---
B---8----7----5---
G---9----7----5---
D---9----7----5---
A---7----5----3---
E---7--------------

? please help me
#2
id try e minor first b/c thats wat the first chord is. theres lots of other modes but try that.
#3
All the chords fit in the key of Em and when repeating the chord progression, Em sounds like the tonic chord. You could also try to use separate scales over each chord - for example Em over the Em chord, D over the D chord and C over the C chord. Or you could try using modes such as E Dorian or E Phrygian, however they won't work over each chord.
#4
That common progression is in E minor.

There are different ways to solo over that. You can ;
a) Solo only in the E minor (aeolian) scale
b)Switch modes with each chord

I suggest sticking with option A right now, until you learn more about the theory behind it. Then it'll be easier (and it will sound better) to go to option B.
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#5
Quote by michal23
All the chords fit in the key of Em and when repeating the chord progression, Em sounds like the tonic chord. You could also try to use separate scales over each chord - for example Em over the Em chord, D over the D chord and C over the C chord. Or you could try using modes such as E Dorian or E Phrygian, however they won't work over each chord.

so whenever i change the chord the scale changes along?
how do you know that E minor is the right chord to use?
#6
Quote by toine
so whenever i change the chord the scale changes along?
how do you know that E minor is the right chord to use?

Usually, tends to be that the first chord is the same note as the right scale. Just normally, not always though. You could try the highest 4 notes of each scale (every half-step) until you find the one that suits.

Don't know if that makes sense to you.
#7
Quote by toine
so whenever i change the chord the scale changes along?
how do you know that E minor is the right chord to use?


Whenever you change the chord, you can change the scale but don't have to; it is merely an option.

I know that E minor is a good scale to use because all the chords fit in the key of Em.

The key of Em is: E F# G A B C D E (If you don't know why, I suggest you look up and learn the Major and Minor scales in the lessons section).

The notes of Em are: E G C
The notes of D are: D F# A
The notes of C are: C E G
(If you don't know why, look up lessons on chord construction)

If you notice, all the notes in these chords are also in the key of Em, making Em a good choice of scale to use to solo over these chords.
#8
^^^ not necesarily. if all the chords have a fairly similar scale, then just use the same one over the top. if the chords are wierd, and thier recpective scales are nothing like each other, then change them with each chord.
just a very basic, non technical, practical answer.
ope it works
'If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music.' Albert Einstein
#9
Quote by Deagle-Eyes
Usually, tends to be that the first chord is the same note as the right scale. Just normally, not always though. You could try the highest 4 notes of each scale (every half-step) until you find the one that suits.

Don't know if that makes sense to you.

not really. links to lessons maybe?
#10
Click on the 'Lessons' link at the top of this page, from there you can search for what you want to learn or look for lessons in the categories.