#1
hi
just little confused on making chords
regarding these formulas for chords :
major chords : R - major third - perfect fifth
minor chords : R - minor third - perfect fifth
diminished chords : R - minor third - diminished fifth
augmented chords : R - major third - augmented fifth

so if for example in Aminor scale ( A B C D E F G ) i want to create diminished chords of third degree of scale ( C ) can i apply the formula of dminished chords and create c diminished ?
in fact those are formulas pre applied in scales ? or you can apply them on any note in any scale and get your desired chord ?
or you have to just use the triads rule ?
#2
Typically your diminished chords will be the 7th degree of the scale (using the major scale), so B in your case. However you can apply that formula to any note to get the desired chord, just make sure you follow the interval formula.
#3
Well, Cdim does not fit in the Am scale.

The way chords are formed is basing the intervals off of the major scale. So, Cdim is 1 b3 b5 and the C major scale is C D E F G A B. You take the 1, C, you take the third and flatten it, E to Eb, and you take the 5 and flatten it, G to Gb, and get C Eb Gb.
#4
thanks
i thought about same thing that for ex. that C dim does not fit into A minor scale any way and no good sound
then actually is there point in applying those formula for getting diffrent chords rather than the main one in any scale ?
in fact if you create in this case C dim in Aminor scale there is no use for it right?
#5
Quote by dimebag1d
thanks
i thought about same thing that for ex. that C dim does not fit into A minor scale any way and no good sound
then actually is there point in applying those formula for getting diffrent chords rather than the main one in any scale ?
in fact if you create in this case C dim in Aminor scale there is no use for it right?
There is definitely a use for it.

Anyway, what you're trying to do is apply those chord formulas to scales. The way scales are, the chords that "fit" are already predetermined. A C E form A minor, B D F form B diminished, etc. What those formulas are helpful for is determining the actual intervals. For instance, since you already know that A C E is A minor, you can determine that A is the root, C is the minor third, and E is the perfect fifth. OR also for forming a chord not based off a scale. You can form a D diminished without thinking of it in regards to a scale. Over time, however, this knowledge will all mesh together and you will know almost instantly the chord qualities, intervals, and notes for any given progression.