#1
about a week ago i was in my friends house, he's really good on drums so brought my bass, it was the first time i played with a drummer and im not the best, basicly i didnt have a clue wat to play or wat mite sound good.. ne suggestions?
#2
Create a groovey bassline, start out with some easy funk (Octaves, fifths, some stacatto playing, etc). Then let the drummer make a beat to it. From their improvise by following your fingers (Although this depends on how much experience you have improvising >.<
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#3
play any riff. as long as it isnt a single note no rhythm thing
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#4
It really doesn't matter as long as you stay on time with each other. Almost anything will sound good with a drummer.
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#5
That's not much help...

Try and follow the rhythm of his drumming, maybe focus on a certain part of his kit ie the bass drum or the cymbal or the snare or something.

Then play in rhythm with that part of his kit, it'll sound more complementary. Also just generally follow his style. Don't start playing slap bass if he's doing blastbeats.

I dunno, more information would create greater advice.

One hint though: if you're thinking of doing an actual band, it's easier for you to have a starting point than the drummer. Not many songs are known for their drum beats, most drum beats are based round the bass, guitar and vocal melodies.
#6
Have him start off with a drum riff and then add a simple easy bass riff over that. Then start working variations off of that--don't worry it about it sounding 100% perfect, just go for the groove and have fun.

Key on the bass drum and either the hi-hat or the ride. You should be hitting a bass note 95% of the time he or she hits the bass drum. Don't over play at first; and as you play more together you will learn when to add more to their simple drum parts and when you need to lay back to a more simple bass line to let them have their moment of sonic fury.
#7
thanks guys

''dunno, more information would create greater advice''

dude this guy played a female beat and told me to play whatever i want and i didnt know whether to start playin scales or songs or just attack the damn bass with my thumb??
#8
Quote by Heavens_To_Hell
That's not much help...

Try and follow the rhythm of his drumming, maybe focus on a certain part of his kit ie the bass drum or the cymbal or the snare or something.

Then play in rhythm with that part of his kit, it'll sound more complementary. Also just generally follow his style. Don't start playing slap bass if he's doing blastbeats.

I dunno, more information would create greater advice.

One hint though: if you're thinking of doing an actual band, it's easier for you to have a starting point than the drummer. Not many songs are known for their drum beats, most drum beats are based round the bass, guitar and vocal melodies.


Thats very bad advice, as a bassist and a drummer I can tell you that listening to the drummer is very important and vice/versa. If he is the superior musician than let him start then follow his kick drum pattern, if you're going to play slap/pop try and lock right in with him. Your slaps will tend to be his kick drum hits, your pops will tend to be his snare hits. Chad Smith and Flea of RHCP are one of the best examples of that real tightness. Honestly the best way to improve playing with a drummer is just to do it a lot.
#9
Quote by slaptasticdave
Thats very bad advice, as a bassist and a drummer I can tell you that listening to the drummer is very important and vice/versa. If he is the superior musician than let him start then follow his kick drum pattern, if you're going to play slap/pop try and lock right in with him. Your slaps will tend to be his kick drum hits, your pops will tend to be his snare hits. Chad Smith and Flea of RHCP are one of the best examples of that real tightness. Honestly the best way to improve playing with a drummer is just to do it a lot.


No I didn't mean don't play slap bass at all.

I meant if he starts playing something completely death metal based or something then playing long funk solos most likely won't fit.

Obviously there are bands like RHCP and the Mars Volta who don't and blend genres. That works for them, but in terms of a quick jam session I personally don't think it's a good idea to start doing really complex genres blends and stuff.

It obviously all comes down to the pairing and the style of music. TS, if you have a sick ass funk riff that sounds like it'll fit over something heavy then play it and see what happens!