#1
Instead of spending hours and hours learning scales can't you just learn the fretboard inside out so you always know which note you hit will sound "right?"
Originally posted by HarmlessLilF*ck
im not gay or anything, but if brad pitt asked me to stick my penis in him, i probably would.
#2
You need to know your scales in order to know whether the note you're about to hit will sound 'right' or not.
#3
Quote by sotto
Instead of spending hours and hours learning scales can't you just learn the fretboard inside out so you always know which note you hit will sound "right?"

If you don't know the theory behind scales and harmony, you won't be able to immediately know what sounds "right", or how anything's going to function and sound. Learn the theory.
#6
Quote by confusius
Apart from the fact that the human brain isn't capable to synthesize that information on the fly so quickly.


Fail.

And you might as well add having perfect pitch to the list of things that are good to know for soloing.
Quote by DiMeTiMe
+3.141592

Quote by imgooley
It was such a good suggestion you gave him pi?

yeah, he gave me pi.
#7
How do I fail?


EDIT: And you can't "know" perfect pitch. If he doesn't have it know he's going to have a hard time ever achieving it. Very good relative ear? That's a completely different matter.
Last edited by confusius at Jun 1, 2008,
#9
Basically what "knowing" a scale helps you do is organize the notes by some set
of note functions -- these are landmarks if you will. When you're familiar with the
landmarks, you can more easily make predictions about how something is going to
sound just before you play it. A scale is not some notes you HAVE to play.

Knowing "every note on the fretboard" essentially gives you the chromatic scale.
Every other scale you could potentially play, ANY other scale, is a subset of
the chromatic scale. I don't think anyone in their right mind would ever suggest
all you need to do is learn the chromatic scale since all other scales are found in it.