#1
Hey guys what's goin on? Lately ive been trying to do a little more soloing with my buddies when we jam. I can play rhythm very good but i cannot improve solos very good. I dont know many scales but i am buliding my knowledge base. Here's my question: Say we are playing in the Key of A. And lets say im using the Minor Penatonic scale. Starting 5th fret i know the scale perfectly. But i feel like im limited to that part of the neck. What do i need to learn to move that scale down the neck? Is it the different patterns? Im a little confused. I guess i only know one pattern of this scale? Am I correct?
#2
The Am pentatonic scale is the notes A C D E G. You can play those notes anywhere on the neck.

Use google to find a scalefinder and look up the various patterns.
#3
See, a scale isn't a pattern, it's a collection of notes constructed by a series of different intervals.


If you learn the intervals, you immediately have the ability to construct a scale in any key starting from any note anywhere on the neck, in any country in the world!


That's why patterns are flawed. They're the short way out. You should learn how the scale works, and from the learn the patterns to apply it. If you only learn the patterns your application of the scale will be limited.
#4
Yeah, there are various patterns around the neck. I prefer to use diatonic scales when soloing, and when I am soloing in also, say A major, and want to move it higher up the neck, I'll just play at the 12th fret in the E Mixolydian position - it is still the A Major scale being played.
#5
Quote by michal23
I'll just play at the 12th fret in the E Mixolydian position
This is a misleading statement. There is no one mixolydian position. The A major scale at the 12th fret is simply the A major scale, not E Mixolydian.
#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
This is a misleading statement. There is no one mixolydian position. The A major scale at the 12th fret is simply the A major scale, not E Mixolydian.


I suppose it is a little misleading - what I mean is that I play in what would be considered the common pattern for the mixolydian scale.
#7
Quote by michal23
I suppose it is a little misleading - what I mean is that I play in what would be considered the common pattern for the mixolydian scale.
In this context, the scale is the 12 position of the A major scale. Don't bring the mixolydian mode into this unless you're playing in E Mixolydian.
#8
Learn the notes of the fretboard before you learn the notes of the scale.

After that you've pretty much cracked it. Just learn to be adventurous and you'll be fine.
#10
Quote by SloppyJoseph
Hey guys what's goin on? Lately ive been trying to do a little more soloing with my buddies when we jam. I can play rhythm very good but i cannot improve solos very good. I dont know many scales but i am buliding my knowledge base. Here's my question: Say we are playing in the Key of A. And lets say im using the Minor Penatonic scale. Starting 5th fret i know the scale perfectly. But i feel like im limited to that part of the neck. What do i need to learn to move that scale down the neck? Is it the different patterns? Im a little confused. I guess i only know one pattern of this scale? Am I correct?


The Am Pentatonic that you're playing from the 5th fret is known as Am Pentatonic shape 1. You say you're limited to just that part of the neck, so, to slowly build your knowledge of the Pentatonic shapes, your next step is to learn Am Pentatonic shape 2. This will start from, you guessed it, the 2nd note from shape 1 which is C, on the 8th fret.

I hardly ever have my guitar when on UG, but this is shape 2 (hopefully right)

Am Pent shape 2

-8-10
-8-10
-7-9
-7-10
-7-10
-8-10

So when you solo now, you can join shape 1 and shape 2 together, covering a little bit more of the fret board. When you're comfortable with shape 2, learn shape 3, 4 and 5.

Its important to realise that all the shapes contain exactly the same notes. They're just starting on a different note.

Penta is Greek for 5 I believe, thus the Pentatonic Scale has 5 notes in it.
#11
Remember that that one position covers more than half of the guitar's range, that is a LOT of space to work with.

This link shows the 5 patterns and how they go together
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/scales/minor_pentatonic_scales.html
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums