#1
hey i know how to get the chord progressions for mayor scales but how do i get them for natural minor,harmonic minor, melodic minor ascending, melodic minor descending??
#2
natural minor is the same as major but just starting on the sixth degree i believe
i iidim III iv v VI VII i
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#3
Well all of those scales are a starting point inside the major scale and will fit in it perfectly if i'm right. that'll help.
ADVERTISING SPACE FOR SALE!
I don't charge much...

If you don't click this , you'll die :/
#4
The chordal sequence of any natural minor scale (aeolian mode) is the same as its corresponding relative major scale (relative major scales are three half-steps up from the root of the minor, i.e. A minor and C major). The harmonic and melodic minors have different chords for each degree of the scale, however.
Tiger style.
#5
Quote by C.C. Deville
natural minor is the same as major but just starting on the sixth degree i believe
i iidim III iv v VI VII i


but what do you to get that , like in the mayor sale? that you get the triad of one chord and compare it with the scale
#6
hey i know how to get the chord progressions for mayor scales but how do i get them for natural minor,harmonic minor, melodic minor ascending, melodic minor descending?
The same basic way as the major scale.

For A natural minor
A B C D E F G

First note is A, a third above A is C, a fifth above A is E
First triad is A C E - Am

Second note is B, a third above B is D, a fifth above B is F
Second triad is B D F - Bdim

Continue this pattern for all the notes and you get the triads in that key.

Do exactly the same for harmonic and melodic minor (note that descending melodic minor is the same as natural minor)
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
A note on the melodic minor: it is rarely played different up and down in modern music.


And it's rarely (if ever) used to construct chord progressions, hence the name.

I would add that, if you aren't familiar with chord construction, you aren't ready to be worrying about harmonic and melodic minor scales.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Quote by Ænimus Prime
The same basic way as the major scale.

For A natural minor
A B C D E F G

First note is A, a third above A is C, a fifth above A is E
First triad is A C E - Am

Second note is B, a third above B is D, a fifth above B is F
Second triad is B D F - Bdim

Continue this pattern for all the notes and you get the triads in that key.

Do exactly the same for harmonic and melodic minor (note that descending melodic minor is the same as natural minor)


your wrong i think because to get b , B D F# and you need to flatten F so yo uget intervals 1 3 b5 but that doesnt exist so what you do therE?
#11
Quote by alexcp94
your wrong i think because to get b , B D F# and you need to flatten F so yo uget intervals 1 3 b5 but that doesnt exist so what you do therE?

He's right. You're wrong.

B isn't minor in the key of A minor, it's diminished. B D F, intervals 1 b3 b5.
#12
Quote by :-D
He's right. You're wrong.

B isn't minor in the key of A minor, it's diminished. B D F, intervals 1 b3 b5.


why b3? you didnt do anything to the 3 it stays at D
#13
Quote by alexcp94
why b3? you didnt do anything to the 3 it stays at D

All intervals are notated in reference to the respective major scale, so "3" would be D# because that's the 3 of B major. In B minor it's flattened to D, and therefore becomes a b3.
#14
B to D is a b3 interval.

All intervals are relative to the major scale of the 1 of the chord. The B major scale is B C# D# E F# G# A#, so 1 b3 b5 is B D F.
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
B to D is a b3 interval.

All intervals are relative to the major scale of the 1 of the chord. The B major scale is B C# D# E F# G# A#, so 1 b3 b5 is B D F.

yea but we are getting the chord progressions of a minor scale not major scale so it would be b minor scale B C# D E F# G A B not B C# D# E F# G# A# B
#16
Quote by alexcp94
yea but we are getting the chord progressions of a minor scale not major scale so it would be b minor scale B C# D E F# G A B not B C# D# E F# G# A# B

Like I said, everything is referred to as it relates to the respective major scale. This is not an exception.
#17
Quote by Archeo Avis
And it's rarely (if ever) used to construct chord progressions, hence the name.

I would add that, if you aren't familiar with chord construction, you aren't ready to be worrying about harmonic and melodic minor scales.


I've seen it in pop music though. Listen to this song called Alumina by the Japanese Band Nightmare. They use chords from B natural minor, B harmonic minor and B melodic Minor.
#18
Quote by ouchies
I've seen it in pop music though. Listen to this song called Alumina by the Japanese Band Nightmare. They use chords from B natural minor, B harmonic minor and B melodic Minor.


What chords, exactly, do they derive from melodic minor?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.