#1
Hello there. I've been playing for a decent amount of time, and i can improv solos well and lead, but last night at a battle of bands my group was doing Sunshine of Your Love, which i've always had trouble even replicating that solo. Amazingly i did it almost note for note and it had that Cream Clapton-Esque sound. I try it again though, and it doesn't. So does anyone have tips for that solo or any other clapton one? (While my guitar gently weeps) Generally i play more like Glenn Tipton on my stuff.
#2
hmm. well on the sunshine solo he plays a little lazy. meaning that he doesn't really play on the beat, he waits just a little bit after then starts his phrases. I think he might even have played it on beat in the studio then moved it back a few milliseconds to give it that laziness. but I'm not sure on that.
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#3
Yeah i noticed that as well. I always have trouble playing with that one though. It's so strange because i can play alot of his other things well. Even Crossroads i can do pretty well but sunshine for me generally sounds just sub par. Except last night though, haha i blazed it.
#5
Thanks. Im generally not a blues guy but i love all clapton. Generally i play Judas Priest type metal. And Beatles. Go Beatles!!
#7
If you like Priest, work on some of K.K. Downing's solos; he's got a generally more blues-based style than Tipton, who comes closer to neoclassically styled work. Then take some of those sequences and simply slow them down.
#8
By bad. I don't know who plays what.

Still, hard rock and metal is very blues based. They're kind of a mxture of blues and classical music with distorted guitars.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
By bad. I don't know who plays what.

Still, hard rock and metal is very blues based. They're kind of a mxture of blues and classical music with distorted guitars.

Yeah, that wasn't at you; both of them use blues licks, of course, but Tipton has a more classically-influenced style so the influence is less obvious most of the time.
#10
Quote by VoodooCow229
hmm. well on the sunshine solo he plays a little lazy. meaning that he doesn't really play on the beat, he waits just a little bit after then starts his phrases. I think he might even have played it on beat in the studio then moved it back a few milliseconds to give it that laziness. but I'm not sure on that.


Well, it was probably because Clapton was stoned out of his head. Have you read his autobiography?

He was the best guitarist of his generation imo. I could go on, but this is the wrong forum. Either way, he's my biggest influence for guitar.
#11
slowhand..lazy..hmm..

perhaps its the opening notes from an old standard "blue moon" that set the pace for "sunshine" but for me it is one of his best constructed solos..very tasty..

wolf
#12
Quote by VoodooCow229
hmm. well on the sunshine solo he plays a little lazy. meaning that he doesn't really play on the beat, he waits just a little bit after then starts his phrases. I think he might even have played it on beat in the studio then moved it back a few milliseconds to give it that laziness. but I'm not sure on that.


Its called playing behind the beat and people do it on purpose to give it that laid back sound.
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#14
Quote by radiantmoon
Its called playing behind the beat and people do it on purpose to give it that laid back sound.


Quote by GoDrex
I wouldn't call it lazy - I'd call it laying back in the pocket - -you can be on the beat, in front of the beat or behind it... if you're good you make it work.



+1 on both of those. its a feel thing.