#1
So I've been playing my brother's Alvarez RD8 for a while, and I think it's about $300. I've become in love with it, especially when equipped with lighter strings. It was stock with a nice, low action and everything feels great, there's close to absolutely zero bow in the neck, and the tuners maintain for days and days at a time. But, then I went and played some other, more expensive guitars, and I realized that they all sucked in comparison. Now that kind of got me sad, because no matter how much I love this guitar, it's going to go bad someday.. The bridge might come up, the neck may snap, I don't know... Anyways, it got me sad because I was thinking that this guitar is way too cheap to be this good no matter which RD8 you pick out to play.

And I was thinking... Did I just get lucky, or does Alvarez really make amazing guitars?

Oh and uh, while I'm making a thread, I might as well ask.. Is it easy to repair a bridge that has come up off the wood a little bit? Mine's sneaking up, and it makes me a little paranoid. Also, I'd like to clean up the whole thing, what do you recommend I use to polish/buff it with, and how might I go about cleaning the fretboard?
TOO MANY PUPPIES

Soda sucks.
#2
an rd8 is about $150.
i own one, and like you said, its pretty nice compared to other really low end acoustics.

but i dont really think its anything special
not a special tonewood or neck or anything, just a starter guitar.
#3
If you want to get it generally cleaned up, I recommend taking it to a guitar shop and getting the guy there to perform a total general clean-up/maintenance on it. I did it with my Cort earlier this yea, and when I got it back I was so pleased. I payed something around the equivalent of US$50, and the guy polished the whole body, cleaned the fretboard, straightened out the neck a bit, changed the strap buttons, and just generally checked it to make sure it was in good working order. It's definitely worth doing once every few years, as well as making minor changes every now and then yourself when you need to.
#4
Quote by Firequacker

And I was thinking... Did I just get lucky, or does Alvarez really make amazing guitars?

I'm sure it's very good for what it is, and what it is is an all-laminate budget guitar. It might be well built/set-up and maintained, but I'm skeptical about it's ability to stack up tonewise against most other solid-top guitars.

If it makes you feel any better, a well made laminate guitar tends to be more durable than a solid wood guitar *of equal quality* because laminate is not as easily affected by changes in temperature and humidity, and it's just less likely to crack or split from an impact than solid wood. So in theory, this guitar could last a long time if you take care of it.

Oh and uh, while I'm making a thread, I might as well ask.. Is it easy to repair a bridge that has come up off the wood a little bit? Mine's sneaking up, and it makes me a little paranoid.
You should definitely not attempt to fix a loose bridge on your own. Take it to a luthier to have it repaired and make sure he/she diagnoses the cause of the problem. The bridge could have been poorly glued from the start, in which case regluing it properly will solve the problem.

However, if the damage has been caused by your own inadvertent mistreatment of the guitar, you need to know what you've done wrong to prevent it from happening again. Do you leave your guitar by a window in full sun? Do you leave in a parked car to bake? Extreme heat could have cause the glue to break down. Improper care can also cause the top to "bulge" or "belly" and the bridge to pull off.
Last edited by sunshowers at Jun 1, 2008,
#5
Quote by sunshowers
I'm sure it's very good for what it is, and what it is is an all-laminate budget guitar. It might be well built/set-up and maintained, but I'm skeptical about it's ability to stack up tonewise against most other solid-top guitars.

If it makes you feel any better, a well made laminate guitar tends to be more durable than a solid wood guitar *of equal quality* because laminate is not as easily affected by changes in temperature and humidity, and it's just less likely to crack or split from an impact than solid wood. So in theory, this guitar could last a long time if you take care of it.

You should definitely not attempt to fix a loose bridge on your own. Take it to a luthier to have it repaired and make sure he/she diagnoses the cause of the problem. The bridge could have been poorly glued from the start, in which case regluing it properly will solve the problem.

However, if the damage has been caused by your own inadvertent mistreatment of the guitar, you need to know what you've done wrong to prevent it from happening again. Do you leave your guitar by a window in full sun? Do you leave in a parked car to bake? Extreme heat could have cause the glue to break down. Improper care can also cause the top to "bulge" or "belly" and the bridge to pull off.


I'm much less an acoustic player than a mostly electric player, so im not exactly a tone junky when it comes to wood. I really know very little... All I know is that this guitar plays very well. I actually have noticed that its tone isn't too strong, but still, it plays better than most guitars I've handled, besides those professionally set-up.
TOO MANY PUPPIES

Soda sucks.
#6
Well, regardless of my skepticism, this guitar clearly makes you happy and that's really all that matters.

Re: professional set-ups - I really think all guitars should be professionally set up from the start. The music store that I buy from is really great in that set-up is free for any guitar you buy there - even a $150 cheapie.
#7
That's right, Alvarez just make great guitars
Let me tell you about heartache and the loss of god
Wandering, wandering in hopeless night
Out here in the perimeter there are no stars

Out here we is stoned
Immaculate.