#1
Hi, this is my first post here and I'm very excited. My question is this, how are keys determined? By the location of the 6th string, or the begging of a chord progression?
E.g. The progression Cmaj, Amin, Fmaj, Gmaj. All played in standard tuning with no capo.
Key of Emaj? Cmaj? I don't know.

Thank you.
#3
That is a I vi IV V progression in C major. The chords contain the notes:
Cmaj - C E G
Amin - A C E
Fmaj - F A C
Gmaj - G B D

C major contains the notes C D E F G A B C. All of the chords fit, so they are in C major.

A quicker way to figure it out is just to play the progression and listen for the chord that sounds 'at home' and doesn't want to move anywhere - that is (usually) the key.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#4
read josh urbans articles there titled "the crusade" there great and should set you straight
Livin For the Music


dimebag420666 wrote:

i play guitar with my penis
#5
Alright, so the key of a progression is determined by the scale?
Thanks for all your help.
#6
that progression does suggest C Maj. the progression is I vi IV V

the movement of harmony from the V chord (G major in this instance) to the I chord (C major in this instance) is the quickest way to establish the tonal centre and also key of the piece for major and minor tonalities.

as for your question as to whether a key of a progression is determined by the scale i think that's correct. (i could be wrong and if any of the experts here can explain it better please do). in application to this example:

C Major Scale
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
C D E F G A B C

Diatonic Triads (3 note chords) in Major Key
I ii iii IV V vi viidim I
C Dm Em F G Amin Bdim C

If you look at the notes that make up all of those chords you will notice that they all fall within the C Major scale. What makes the progression C Major is those notes with a tonal centre of C. As you play the progression you will probably notice that at the end when playing the G chord, the C chord sounds like it should come right after. That tells you that C is your tonal centre.

The key of a song is NOT always determined by the first chord played so it would help to learn the theory behind chord harmony and scales. I would recommend working through the theory sticky at the top of the forum and making sure that you understand each segment and try to apply it. In otherwords, read a section, pick up the guitar and try to make sense of it. it also helped me to have a notebook to write what i have learned so that it sticks a little bit better in my head.
#7
Well, the key is usually determined by the revolving note (sp?), aka at most times the first one (not always, depends on melody), or the last one (also depends on cadency)....

The best way would be checking the alterations of he song, and check the alterations next to the cleff (don't kjnow the name in english)...
And to determine if it is minor or major, without knowing the song already or playing it, would be checking any harmonic or melodic scale to see if it is minor, or only the own scale and maybe a mied scale to determine if it is major....

Don't know how to determine the modes though...
#8
revolving note (sp?)

resolving
and check the alterations next to the cleff (don't kjnow the name in english)
Key signature
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#9
It can also be V,ii,bvii,I

Which can be in the key of G

Maybe someone else can come along and explain it better.
You play the bvii as a major chord.
kind of like sweet home alabama is in the key of D as I, bvii,IV
instead of G V, IV,I

I'm barely starting to grasp this and it hasn't totally sunk in yet
#11
Quote by Ænimus Prime
A quicker way to figure it out is just to play the progression and listen for the chord that sounds 'at home' and doesn't want to move anywhere - that is (usually) the key.

Just for reference, MobTown, this "home" is referred to as a tonal center. It's important to figure out where the tonal center is; for example, A minor and C major have the same notes, but it's very easy to say that you're in C major because that is the tonal center. I hope that makes some sense, if not I'll be happy to clarify.