#1
Is it best to learn all 5 patterns of a scale in one key then move on to the other keys? That's what I have done so far with the A minor scale and I have just started learning E minor.
Or is it best to learn one pattern at a time so after learning it on A minor for example you just move to the root note of the next key?

Hope I have been clear.
Cheers
Originally posted by HarmlessLilF*ck
im not gay or anything, but if brad pitt asked me to stick my penis in him, i probably would.
#2
Learn the patterns in one key. Playing the same pattern a few frets higher or lower is easy and quite mindless.

Moreover, learn the theory behind scales and learn your fretboard.
#3
Learn the theory. Find a teacher who knows theory and not jus the scales. Or use a book and learn it on your own, if you wish. Either way, learn the ****in theory. Why? Cuz musicians who know theory are better musicians than those who don't.
#5
just memorize them in one key until you can play it quickly and correctly, and than just change keys, if you practiced it enough, its really quite mindless to go to a new key
"To me it seems pretty straightforward. There are two opinions one can have about freedom of speech, you're for it or against it." - Tom Morello


Shackled Our Minds When You're Bent on the Cross... When Ignorance Reigns, Life is Lost
#6
Quote by Metallist65
Learn the theory. Find a teacher who knows theory and not jus the scales. Or use a book and learn it on your own, if you wish. Either way, learn the ****in theory. Why? Cuz musicians who know theory are better musicians than those who don't.


Not true.
#7
Soto, can I get a link to whatever you're looking at for the scale structures please?

Thanks in advance.
#9
Quote by Metallist65
Learn the theory. Find a teacher who knows theory and not jus the scales. Or use a book and learn it on your own, if you wish. Either way, learn the ****in theory. Why? Cuz musicians who know theory are better musicians than those who don't.
Tell that to Hendrix.
Quote by MightyAl
I took a pic of myself, cut a hole in the face and stuck my knob through so i could see what I'd look like if I got bitten by a radioactive elephant.
#10
Quote by Orbit91
Not true.


Agreed.

Anyway, I learned them each position at a time. So I learned all seven positions of the major scale and then I learned them in different patterns. At the same time I was learning the theory behind the scales. After that I started to learn how to connect the shapes, I started by connect the first 3 shapes, then slowly I tagged the other ones in. Then I started learning how to see the different pentatonic shapes in each scale, this is really really helpful, and I suggest doing it.

Good luck dude!
#11
To be honest, I personally only know one or two shapes for each scale. I get by by knowing what notes are in each scale, the harmonic relationship of each note to the harmony of the piece, and where my notes are on the fretboard.
#12
Quote by Guitar_Theory
I'd say don't learn the patterns at all. It's worthless and you really haven't LEARNED anything.


Check out the link in my sig. It's a workout, but you'll know your stuff.


^ whatever


To the TS:

learning any shape or pattern on the guitar is helpful. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise.

If you learn all 5 patterns ( or 7 if you learn the 3 nps versions) in one key, you can easily move the patterns around to change keys.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 3, 2008,
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
^ whatever


To the TS:

learning any shape or pattern on the guitar is helpful. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise.

If you learn all 5 patterns ( or 7 if you learn the 3 nps versions) in one key, you can easily move the patterns around to change keys.


Okay I'll amend my statement. I started out by learning those patterns, as I guess everyone does, cause yeah they're useful. But I think eventually you'll reach a point where you need something more, when you really need to know the why and how of what you're playing, and not just the mechanics.
#14
Learn the theory...
I would say learn it first and then apply it to the guitar to know how to figer the scales...
Start with for example all major scales, tetrachords, etc, then minors, then the others....
Learn them only in theory, and when you do, you can visualize the notes when you will play guitar (or the instrument)...
#17
Quote by Ferrets!
Tell that to Hendrix.


don't start that ****, it's a lame-ass excuse for not learning theory.

i find that i learn better when i actually put what i am learning to use. it gives you an idea of when to use what your learning, instead of having to stop and think.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#18
Quote by Ferrets!
Tell that to Hendrix.
*facepalm*

Is it a coincidence that the majority of his riffs and solo's were based around pentatonics?

IMO shapes are only good for getting your technique ready to do real improvising and to develop your rhthymic phrases.

Learning just the shape does not mean you've learnt the scale. Learning the scale means learning the intervals/formula behind it, inside out.
#19
Quote by Guitar_Theory
Okay I'll amend my statement. I started out by learning those patterns, as I guess everyone does, cause yeah they're useful. But I think eventually you'll reach a point where you need something more, when you really need to know the why and how of what you're playing, and not just the mechanics.


I agree with this dude. When I was starting out I tried learning just the patterns of the major scale. I had no idea what notes I was playing, my practicing consisted of running back and forth across the patterns a million times with no ability to improv, I began to hate scales and as a result, 4 years later I am a sh*t guitarist compared to what I should/want to be.
Play the music, not the instrument. ~Author Unknown


blackzeppelion
Who's the band that could become the next led zeppelin?
Ovenman
Iron blimp.
J.A.M
Aluminum helicopter.
Ovenman
*Breaks out periodic table* Magnesium bi-plane.