#1
So I searched, came up with nothing.
My friend sent me this link last night, and while it's probably not a credible source, it's intriguing.

10 Puzzling Artifacts

I'm by no means saying I believe everything up on there, but does anyone know more about any of those things? Probably not nearly as "revolutionary" as the site makes them out to be, but I find things like that pretty interesting.
DOWN&OUT
#3
In the second one on the list, how were they able to read the mysterious heiroglyphs?
kill all humans
#5
-Intelligent humans date back much, much further than we realize.
-Other intelligent beings and civilizations existed on earth far beyond our recorded history.
-Our dating methods are completely inaccurate, and that stone, coal and fossils form much more rapidly than we now estimate.

#6
Some Christians theorize - don't believe, theorize/speculate - that the Earth HAS been around for billions of years, and that God simply remade it. Maybe some kind of crazy, endless cycle, which includes different races. In Genesis it says that the Earth was without shape and form - not that it didn't exist.

So thats the Christian take on this stuff. I think Perry Stone was the first to suggest such an idea - Perry Stone is a Christian speaker who likes to theorize about weird stuff like this. Some of you may find some of his stuff pretty interesting, provided you're willing to forgo your own beliefs and be a little open minded.

EDIT: And BTW that was a VERY interesting read. Is there any sources that could confirm the findings listed? Because currently some of them seem hardly credible.
We're only strays.
#7
I have a pretty good book written by Arthur C. Clarke that talks about the Baghdad Battery, the Costa Rican Balls and the Antikythera mechanism, alongside other things, unexplainable, paranormal and cryptozoological. It's called Mysterious World, if you can find it, check it out.
#8
Quote by ( o )===#
-Intelligent humans date back much, much further than we realize.
-Other intelligent beings and civilizations existed on earth far beyond our recorded history.
-Our dating methods are completely inaccurate, and that stone, coal and fossils form much more rapidly than we now estimate.


Why are any of those out-right unbelievable?
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#9
Quote by Deliriumbassist
I have a pretty good book written by Arthur C. Clarke that talks about the Baghdad Battery, the Costa Rican Balls and the Antikythera mechanism, alongside other things, unexplainable, paranormal and cryptozoological. It's called Mysterious World, if you can find it, check it out.

Oh. That sounds kind of interesting. Does it actually come off as factual and credible? Because, like everyone's noted, that's the problem with the link I posted. I mean, their conclusion at the end is way too presumptuous.
Ancient mysteries are the best kind though!
DOWN&OUT
#11
Quote by Jett Diamond
Oh. That sounds kind of interesting. Does it actually come off as factual and credible? Because, like everyone's noted, that's the problem with the link I posted. I mean, their conclusion at the end is way too presumptuous.
Ancient mysteries are the best kind though!


It discusses the stories behind expeditions and any findings that the author has researched, as well as comments by the author at the end of each chapter- even though he's a very well respected fiction author and has written a lot of relevant fiction, he's very skeptical about some of the areas of discussion- the Loch Ness Monster for instance. IIRC, his exact comments are "I believe in Nessie on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays". I don't have the book to hand, but I do believe he references the work.

He's not a scientist, he doesn't pretend to know everything behind the mysteries. He's just compiling related facts and stories. The section on the Tunguska Explosion is fantastic.
#12
Quote by Deliriumbassist
It discusses the stories behind expeditions and any findings that the author has researched, as well as comments by the author at the end of each chapter- even though he's a very well respected fiction author and has written a lot of relevant fiction, he's very skeptical about some of the areas of discussion- the Loch Ness Monster for instance. IIRC, his exact comments are "I believe in Nessie on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays". I don't have the book to hand, but I do believe he references the work.

He's not a scientist, he doesn't pretend to know everything behind the mysteries. He's just compiling related facts and stories. The section on the Tunguska Explosion is fantastic.


Sounds good, I'll try to get a hold of an Ebook form.
We're only strays.
#14
I have actually heard of the "Baghdad Batteries" before, elsewhere. I'm thinking it was on the History Channel.