#1
I know quite a bit of theory but I still have this question.

Once I choose a key to make a song or a jam in, would my chords be as following?

Ex. C major - C dm em F G am bm (or is the b diminished)

I know these are the open position minor or major chords.

If I wanted to do power chords, could I just use c d e f g a b ?

Could I also use the respective bar chords?

As well for solos, would I start on the major pentatonic of the key (so c for example) then slide down four frets to the minor pentatonic (a) ? What other shapes or scales could I use?

What if I wanted to use modes to solo as well, could I use C ionian d dorian, etc...

Can someone give me a good description or lead me to a good thread/lesson please! My teacher totally confused me today
#2
Quote by NickoAbate
I know quite a bit of theory but I still have this question.

Once I choose a key to make a song or a jam in, would my chords be as following?

Ex. C major - C dm em F G am bm (or is the b diminished) B is dimininshed

I know these are the open position minor or major chords.

If I wanted to do power chords, could I just use c d e f g a b ?

any chords as long as it resolves back to C

Could I also use the respective bar chords?

barre chords are fine

As well for solos, would I start on the major pentatonic of the key (so c for example) then slide down four frets to the minor pentatonic (a) ? What other shapes or scales could I use?

Cmaj is all over the neck so you would just play the C maj scale. no sliding into a different ''scale'' which is probably just another box position of the Cmaj scale you think is a different scale

What if I wanted to use modes to solo as well, could I use C ionian d dorian, etc...

for D dorian the tonic would have to be a D chord it would have to be minor and something would be stressing the major 6 interval

Can someone give me a good description or lead me to a good thread/lesson please! My teacher totally confused me today


what did he confuse you wiht?

some replies above all in bold
song stuck in my head today


Last edited by lbc_sublime at Jun 2, 2008,
#3
He kind of gave me all this information at once and didn't really show me how to imply it and he just kept going on and on talking. That's why I'm still kind of confused on how to start using all the theory together at once.
#5
if it is your first lesson modes are to advanced and alot of people have alot of misconcepions about them

it is good you do major scale i suggest staying with htat until you understand

1) how to make it

2) the intervals

3)that it is all over the neck and not just 1 position

4) simple triad chord construction


i will post something for you that will help or a link to it that i wrote the other day but first it is important to fully understand the major scale before moving on to other scales and key's that you have posted

the theory we learn is based around the major scale and that is why it is so important to know it pretty much inside and out before moving on to other things
song stuck in my head today


#6
Quote by lbc_sublime
the theory we learn is based around the major scale and that is why it is so important to know it pretty much inside and out before moving on to other things


Sorry I didn't clarify, I do know a lot more theory then I said there, I do know everything there is to know about the major scale and how to make chords, its just the whole concept of putting together the chords and finding the sweet spots to solo in that I'm unsure about.

I do know about modes and their intervals, and already memorized their shapes, same with the pentatonics.
#7
Quote by NickoAbate
Sorry I didn't clarify, I do know a lot more theory then I said there, I do know everything there is to know about the major scale and how to make chords, its just the whole concept of putting together the chords and finding the sweet spots to solo in that I'm unsure about.

I do know about modes and their intervals, and already memorized their shapes, same with the pentatonics.

Firstly, learn about chord progressions and some common ones, it'll help you a lot because that's what "putting together the chords" is.

It's good that you know the modal intervals, but it's dangerous to think of them as shapes.
Question: If I'm playing over a static C major chord and play the following line ascending: F G A B C D E, what mode am I playing in?
#8
learn some phrasing and practice playing chord tones over the chords

there was a good lesson branny put up about phrasing but i can't find it

the rest is just practice and make sure you are using the right scales
song stuck in my head today


#9
Quote by :-D
Question: If I'm playing over a static C major chord and play the following line ascending: F G A B C D E, what mode am I playing in?


From what I know (which is probably wrong lol) I know f is the 4th of c major... so I am going to say lydian? the fourth mode
#10
Quote by NickoAbate
From what I know (which is probably wrong lol) I know f is the 4th of c major... so I am going to say lydian? the fourth mode

You've incorrectly learned modal theory then; I was playing simple C major in that example. Go ahead and review the modes section of the theory sticky so you can get the concept hammered in.
#11
To expand on what D said, playing the notes C D E F G A B in any order in a C major context, a static C major chord included, is C major, not F Lydian, not A Aeolian, just C major.
#12
^Conversely, if you were to play a C major scale over a Dm G vamp(which emphasizes the "dorianness" of the dorian mode), it would be D dorian, no matter how much you think you're playing a C major scale. Thus, what you're playing in is always determined by the chords/harmony.