#1
i have tried to learn this before on my own and i could not do it
can anyone explain breifly on what it is
like i dont understand the v-vii-iv-v

thanks..
#3
my guitar teacher tried explaining it to me as well
it made brief sense while he talked about it, but once i was on my own i had no idea what it was.

something to do with how to know what notes will sound good together? or come after each other....i don't remember
#4
thanks bangoodcharllote
for the link
and sorry about the CoF being backwards
thats why i asked about it i really dont understand it
#5
The circle of fifths is explained well, just backwards. Switch right with left and clockwise with counterclockwise, and flip the CoF about the C to F# axis and it's perfect (that sounds like more than it is).
#6
The circle of fifths has more to do with chords progression, and is a somewhat easy step to learn how to figure the keys out...
I-II-III-IV-V-VI-VII-VIII are roman numerals that determine the grade of a scale. The grade of a scale is the "name" it receives (aka, Do, Re, La, or A, E, B, Bb, B#, etc). In a scale of Cmaj you have as I C (the tonic, first note of scale), and the V is G and VIII is C basicly....
Those numerals are mostly used for chord progression, like a I-VI-V, meaning a C chord, a F chord, and a G chord..
Circle of Fifths relates each key with its tonic (basicly major), and how they relate each other by being a fifth apart....

I personally use another system to determine the keys and alteration cleff (whatever it is called).....
#7
Quote by gonzaw
The circle of fifths has more to do with chords progression, and is a somewhat easy step to learn how to figure the keys out...
I-II-III-IV-V-VI-VII-VIII are roman numerals that determine the grade of a scale. The grade of a scale is the "name" it receives (aka, Do, Re, La, or A, E, B, Bb, B#, etc). In a scale of Cmaj you have as I C (the tonic, first note of scale), and the V is G and VIII is C basicly....
Those numerals are mostly used for chord progression, like a I-VI-V, meaning a C chord, a F chord, and a G chord..
Circle of Fifths relates each key with its tonic (basicly major), and how they relate each other by being a fifth apart....

I personally use another system to determine the keys and alteration cleff (whatever it is called).....
Many incorrect facts are stated in this post. I may explain them later. If not, the correct information can be found in my signature.
#8
Romans are commonly use to distinguish Chords or the degree of the chords.
I think do, ra, mi, fa, so....are for vocals

Sometimes it gets detail (cap or large= Maj) I, IV,V...
I'm not a roman but I think it's 1, 4, 5.

lower case....ii, iii,vi are minors

When use in speach...i think i say "play the 4th chord"...becuase some
people might think i'm speaking toungs if i say "sub-dominate".
Last edited by Ordinary at Jun 3, 2008,
#9
Quote by Ordinary
Romans are commonly use to distinguish Chords or the degree of the chords.
I think do, ra, mi, fa, so....are for vocals

Sometimes it gets detail (cap or large= Maj) I, IV,V...
I'm not a roman but I think it's 1, 4, 5.

lower case....ii, iii,vii are minors

When use in speach...i think i say play the 4th chord...becuase some
people might think i'm speaking toungs if i say sub-dominate.


Wait so which Roman is the I (tonic), Julius Caesar?
#10
The Roman numerals indicate scale degrees, or rather the chords of scale degrees. In C major, it goes I ii iii IV V vii viidim(it should be a degree sign but I don't quite know how to type those out). Upper case are major, lower case are minor, degree symbols are diminished(so C major D minor E minor F major G major A minor B diminished). There's also augmented and altered degrees and stuff but that's not quite so simple. Ordinary, oddly enough, is just about right about the Roman numerals(referred to as figured bass). I do sometimes say subdominant or the actual names of the degrees, but when I'm just jamming with friends I don't expect them to really know what I'm talking about.

Also, do re mi etc. is solfege, which is a different topic. Each does correspond to a note of the scale, but it's for individual notes rather than chords.
#11
let me catch up here we start at the top with C and go counter clockways???

so does that mean i can start at d and just move counterclock ways and that will give me my steps?
#12
counter clockwise ...some people say "CYCLE" to the forth
becuase the Flat key signatures are on the left side of C of
the circle of fifth.

Circle to the Fifth clockwise becuase the Sharp Keys are to the right.

mmm...the 1/2 steps are at 3/4 and 7/8...count accordinng when
playing a major scale forward or backwards.

When applying circle of 5th
look at this for example. what is the root ?
If C is the root ...G is the 5th
If G is the root then C is the 4th

--------------------------
--------------------------
--------------------------
--------------------------
-------3-----------------
-------3-----------------

It's easier to see it on the guitar and apply it, becuase you visually see it
in front of you and the design of the guitar
If you just want to play in the key D...just play the same
pattern as the Key of C but shuffle everything 2 frets.
You can get away without having to memorize exaclty what notes
are sharp or how many.

On a wind instrument, you have to memorize the quanities of # and what
exact notes more.
Last edited by Ordinary at Jun 3, 2008,
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Many incorrect facts are stated in this post. I may explain them later. If not, the correct information can be found in my signature.


I don't remember the english terms, and never viewed the "circle of fifths", since I am not doing that kind of theory....
#14
My approach to the whole circle of fifths thing is just that it tells me the number of sharps or flats in any key.. then I just used it to find 4ths and 5ths, as well as any mode..

this may be common knowledge for some of you but depenending on the interpretation of the circle counterclockwise from lets say A with modes in increasing flats (b7, b3, b6, etc) give the mode in that key of A. That is if you keep in mind that lydian would be E and minor would be C.. the rest you can derive if you look at it.

Alot of people say to just memorize the keys individually but i just derive things, eventually i'll commit more to memory though
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