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#1
Ever since I've started on my eletric guitar, I've always made a habit of resting part of my hand while picking notes. I can tremelo pick fine with this method but if I try to pick further down toward the neck, I have trouble tremelo picking the top base strings as my hand will rest on them and therefore mute them. Is this something I'll have to adjust to?
#3
Resting on the bridge is a bad habit. I just tried and it actually slows me down. If you need stability while picking fast though, try resting your pinky and/or ring finger on the pickguard. Both of my guitar teachers have said this is perfectly fine. You should only rest on the bridge when you're palm muting.
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#4
definitely resting the hand on the bridge is a bad thing, but ive also heard you shouldnt rest your pinky or ring finger on the body either, i know that some very good players do it, but it seems they would be even better if they didnt.

i am myself trying to get rid of that pinky thingy, and its being a hell, started 1 or 2 weeks ago, cant remember, and i am slowly recovering the speed and accuracy i had not long ago -nothing impressive btw-
#5
Quote by MarshmallowPies
, try resting your pinky and/or ring finger on the pickguard. Both of my guitar teachers have said this is perfectly fine.


this sounds like anchoring. please do not do this, you'll appreciate it down the line.
i'm assuming marshmallowpies teachers are not classically trained.
#7
It's fine to do if you're palm muting, right?
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#8
Quote by Third3ye
It's fine to do if you're palm muting, right?



well, yeah, you kind of have to.
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#9
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
well, yeah, you kind of have to.


Not if you're a baller.
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Quote by SG6578
That is regular hard maple...I'm 100% f*cking d*ck licking sure.
#10
^ yes, your god like powers allow you to alter physics and reality and not require touching your palm to the bridge/strings to palm mute.
#13
Check Freepower's sig, No. 5. Explains it in video form.
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#14
This guy, Scott McGill (http://www.scottmcgill.com/video/vdfjhykht.wmv) was a teacher of mine when I was at University of the Arts, and showed me how when playing single note lines, you should almost exclusively play from your forearm, bending at the elbow, using your wrist as little as possible. If you stop using your wrist and play from your forearm, you'll also find you stop resting your wrist on the bridge.

Granted I'm still trying to work this technique up (also trying to perfect my left hand technique), and it certainly takes time to get used to, but it forces you to 1. hold your pick correctly 2. play with proper technique 3. be more economical with your picking (I've noticed I started doing sweep picking without even thinking about it the other day, it just came naturally).

PS. that video I linked too has pretty terrible sound quality, but if you wait until 2:40, you'll see what I mean about increasing speed and stuff. That guy taught me jazz guitar, not prog, and was just amazing at everything from classical to prog, which is what he plays).
#15
I hope it's not bad to do that cuz i do it.
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#17
Quote by Guitar_Theory
This guy, Scott McGill (http://www.scottmcgill.com/video/vdfjhykht.wmv) was a teacher of mine when I was at University of the Arts, and showed me how when playing single note lines, you should almost exclusively play from your forearm, bending at the elbow, using your wrist as little as possible.


i'll have to check out the video when i get home but i think that would be using excessive motion to play from the forearm instead of the wrist. i would think getting up a good speed going from the forearm would bring about far too much tension.
#18
Quote by Guitar_Theory
This guy, Scott McGill (http://www.scottmcgill.com/video/vdfjhykht.wmv) was a teacher of mine when I was at University of the Arts, and showed me how when playing single note lines, you should almost exclusively play from your forearm, bending at the elbow, using your wrist as little as possible. If you stop using your wrist and play from your forearm, you'll also find you stop resting your wrist on the bridge.

Granted I'm still trying to work this technique up (also trying to perfect my left hand technique), and it certainly takes time to get used to, but it forces you to 1. hold your pick correctly 2. play with proper technique 3. be more economical with your picking (I've noticed I started doing sweep picking without even thinking about it the other day, it just came naturally).

PS. that video I linked too has pretty terrible sound quality, but if you wait until 2:40, you'll see what I mean about increasing speed and stuff. That guy taught me jazz guitar, not prog, and was just amazing at everything from classical to prog, which is what he plays).


I have virtually no control over my pick if I play from the elbow.
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#19
Quote by z4twenny
^ that joke went way over my head.

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#20
I rest my palm on the bridge like a very slight palm mute. It gives me stability and makes my playing a little cleaner too (just like my habit of putting my middle finger on the low e string when i'm fingering a power chord on the a string). I can play fine without doing it but it's more comfortable and since i've never had a teacher i've just done what's comfortable and it's been working so far.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


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#21
Theres nothing wrong with anchoring mate! Even the perfectionist classical guitar realm will tell you to lightly rest your thumb on a string when playing scales. Basically just rest your hand lightly and make sure you have no problem moving it freely when you want to have open strings ringing. It can be a crutch if you lock your hand in position, just make sure there is no tension and its just a light resting point that can be removed with no effort. Basically it just be like your hand going limp and resting on something. Well, cya!
#22
it is all a matter of preference. i have a guthrie govan video where he says, that he wrests his palm on the bridge of the guitar.

i don't think his playing has suffered from it.
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#23
Remember the important word here is REST your hand on the bridge, meaning there is no effort involved. If you actually use muscles to hold it in place your doing it wrong.
#24
Quote by Captain Garry
Remember the important word here is REST your hand on the bridge, meaning there is no effort involved. If you actually use muscles to hold it in place your doing it wrong.

“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#26
Quote by Guitar_Theory
This guy, Scott McGill (http://www.scottmcgill.com/video/vdfjhykht.wmv) was a teacher of mine when I was at University of the Arts, and showed me how when playing single note lines, you should almost exclusively play from your forearm, bending at the elbow, using your wrist as little as possible. If you stop using your wrist and play from your forearm, you'll also find you stop resting your wrist on the bridge.


Well, I have to give that a personal +1000! I didn't watch the video, but that sounds
like an exact desrciption of how my picking technique developed once I made
an effort to fix my anchoring and starting working on the Guitar Principles exercises
for picking.

I'd stress, this does NOT mean not to use the wrist. It's just that elbow/forearm is
the "prime mover" in the picking motion. It took some work to get there, but I'm
strongly convinced if you get your elbow control FIRST, your picking will become
a lot more fluid and seamless and you won't need static stabilizing by putting your
hand on the guitar.

I've tried to mention this a number of times. Maybe some get it, but it sure seems
like "wrist-only" is what most adere to. Jimmy Bruno is another that recommends
elbow in his picking vids.
#27
Sorry but picking from your forearm is a terrible technique. Using your forearm in picking involves a lot more tension than using your wrist. Heavy forearm technique is used mostly in "spaz picking" which is a bad way to get speed. You probably got confused when picking really fast and THOUGHT it was your forearm but its really your wrist but its just moving very little because your going so fast. DO NOT USE FOREARM PICKING!!!
#28
Actually I just realized I do lightly rest the rear of my right palm on the back of the bridge when I alt pick on my acoustic, mainly because the wide body of the acoustic puts my arm in a really awkward, uncomfortable position if I don't.

As for the forearm thing, only use your forearm when you are strumming, and even then, unless you are really hitting the strings hard for dynamic effect, your wrist should be doing most of the work.
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#29
Quote by edg


I've tried to mention this a number of times. Maybe some get it, but it sure seems
like "wrist-only" is what most adere to. Jimmy Bruno is another that recommends
elbow in his picking vids.



Haha man Jimmy and I are buds. He lives near me and I used to study with him off and on. He's a hilarious guy.

Sorry but picking from your forearm is a terrible technique. Using your forearm in picking involves a lot more tension than using your wrist. Heavy forearm technique is used mostly in "spaz picking" which is a bad way to get speed. You probably got confused when picking really fast and THOUGHT it was your forearm but its really your wrist but its just moving very little because your going so fast. DO NOT USE FOREARM PICKING!!!


You would get assassinated if you walked into any music university that teaches jazz guitar. You are so wrong it's just.....it's fascinating.

As for the forearm thing, only use your forearm when you are strumming, and even then, unless you are really hitting the strings hard for dynamic effect, your wrist should be doing most of the work.


Please see the previous statement.
#31
i'm home and the webpage wouldn't open. i stand by my statement, i believe picking from the forearm would cause excessive unecessary tension. by the dynamics of it i can't fathom how it could possibly be more efficient than picking from the wrist.
#32
Quote by z4twenny
i'm home and the webpage wouldn't open. i stand by my statement, i believe picking from the forearm would cause excessive unecessary tension. by the dynamics of it i can't fathom how it could possibly be more efficient than picking from the wrist.


You practice not tensing your arm. It is something you actually do work on, but once you get it down (it's an advanced technique, it takes time and work), it puts less stress on your body than constantly torquing your wrist and forearm.
#33
Quote by Guitar_Theory

You would get assassinated if you walked into any music university that teaches jazz guitar. You are so wrong it's just.....it's fascinating.


Interesting if that's what's taught.

Much like that poster, when this topic comes up, a loud majority screams WRIST
ONLY.

I guess YMMV. But I went through a redo'ing of my picking from the bottom up (I
had terrible, even worse than, anchoring problems), I started with the Guitar
Principles picking material. That material doesn't even *mention" wrist.
It's all about learning string to string control from the *elbow* as the foundation
for your picking.

It took some work, but I have to say it is amazingly freeing when you get the hang of
it. It just seems like the pick flows over the strings more, and it makes no diff
picking near bridge vs neck, and more of your "body" goes into the dynamics of
your picking.

I think if early focus is on the elbow, the wrist will follow along naturally and you'll
get a nice fluid picking motion that's very generalized. If you start from the wrist,
you risk an immobile and stiff elbow, you'll tend to need to anchor to stabilize,
you'll try coming up with different motions for different situations, you'll tend to
be less accurate, less control. It's the latter that most people try and I think it
gives them a lot of picking problems.

So, keep an open mind. Something new you try might just open up your playing
more.
#34
Quote by z4twenny
i'm home and the webpage wouldn't open. i stand by my statement, i believe picking from the forearm would cause excessive unecessary tension. by the dynamics of it i can't fathom how it could possibly be more efficient than picking from the wrist.


No, there's definitely no tension. I think if you look at the ENTIRE picking
"mechanism" as shoulder-elbow-wrist-fingers, each muscle group from large to
small can play a part efficiently in picking. Dimemsion-wise, I think the sweet spot
is somewhere between the wrist and elbow. But, where tension can be introduced
is when one muscle group tries to subsume the task more efficiently done by
another. Fast string to string motion I think is a pretty good case for elbow
involvment as it can get the wrist into string position quickly without excess wrist
stretch and tension.
#35
^ i see what you're saying, in moving from string to string yes there will definitely be elbow movement (imo a tiny amount but its still there) but the way i see it is its almost entirely wrist based on single string passages. on the smallest of levels the elbow moves but from what i can tell its so minimal it's virtually (i'd like to emphasize i did say virtually, not entirely) negligible. but the way guitar_theory described it that i interpreted it was that you should be picking almost entirely from the elbow, i wouldn't agree with that at all however. i think especially if picking fast it would cause too much tension in the long run and you could end up tearing up your arm.
#36
Sorry for being a dumbass. In my defense I havent really used a pick for more than 5 mins in the past year.... but that kind of only reinforces why i shouldnt speak on the topic im a **** poster
#37
Eh, I still do pick mostly from my elbow, even with super fast licks, but i don't have too much of a tension problem. A major factor I think too is how you hold your guitar. I keep my guitar super high up on me (like this high: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMVAyf9s2o0) so the whole thing is more natural.

Now obviously there is wrist movement involved, I don't lock my wrist or anything, but I try and do most of the heavy lifting from the elbow. Actually if you watch that video when he plays really fast licks it's basically how I play. I steal a lot of my playing style from Jimmy Bruno.
Last edited by Guitar_Theory at Jun 4, 2008,
#38
Quote by Guitar_Theory



You would get assassinated if you walked into any music university that teaches jazz guitar. You are so wrong it's just.....it's fascinating.




Really? because I took Jazz guitar in college and played in the school jazz band, and they said to always keep your forearm movement to a minimum unless you needed to strum really hard.
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#39
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
Really? because I took Jazz guitar in college and played in the school jazz band, and they said to always keep your forearm movement to a minimum unless you needed to strum really hard.


Alright, now I'm curious if this is like a regional thing or not. Cause there are certainly two "schools" developing here. Every teacher I've talked to here in the Philadelphia area has been all about forearm playing.
#40
^ if thats what you mean by playing from the elbow then go for it. that guy had incredibly good form. i was thinking of larger more exaggerated motions. he moved his arm as needed but not unnecessarily.
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