#1
im semi-new to guitar. ive been playing for about 6 months now and im pretty much just teaching myself. is there anything specific that really helped bring your playing up to a different level? something you done right and think everyone else should do it too? is there anything that was a complete waste of time and should NOT be used? thanks for any answers i get. later yall!
#2
Don't try to play faster than what you can play cleanly. Start slow and concentrate on accuracy. Pick with your wrist, not your arm. Try to practice your scales as well as songs. And most of all, don't look at learning to play as a chore, it's supposed to be fun so keep it that way.

The only thing that hurt me as a self-taught player was ignoring my scales for the first 2 years I played.
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#3
Anything I have practiced the most, I play the best and that's the bottom line.
#4
trying to get by without learning the notes of the fretboard and how to formulate chords, both of these are pretty much essential for improvisation and songwriting IMO.

What helped was learning how to utilize proper classical fingering technique, and learning not to anchor really early on, both not learning good left hand technique and relying on anchoring will slow you down massively later on, and also not using the proper left hand technique is more likely to cause tendonitis and other problems.
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Last edited by Kid_Thorazine at Jun 4, 2008,
#5
Practice chromatic exercises and picking exercises (I can find you some good Paul Gilbert or Yngwie ones if you don't have any) with a metronome if you don't do this already.

Learn music theory, starting with the major scale and the circle of fifths.

I don't know, number of things you could learn... I don't really have any clue how advanced you are just from knowing how long you've played because the learning process is different for most everyone.
#6
help=practice
not help=not practice
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#7
I agree with Mogar. I didn't learn any scales or theroy until about 2 years into it. I can play the hell out of some rhythm but soloing is hard for me because of this. Learn the notes on the guitar and then scales.
#8
Play songs that are way to friggen hard for you to play right now. Seriously, Thats how I'm learning and I'd consider myself above average for my experience, but, It's not like Guitar was the first thing I've learned, so, in terms of helping, It really helps if youve played ANY instrument.

(I for one have found that My First instrument I learned (Saxaphone) is still MUCH harder than Guitar. With a guitar you can just go and jam (Also helpful, getting your fingers intune with your brain on the fretboard)
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#9
String skipping exercises was the thing I noticed results right away. But "practice everything a lot" is still the best advice. LOL
#10
Distortion can help and hinder your playing. The key is to be careful with it. When practising, it's important to play both clean and dirty so as to hear any mistakes and iron them out. Also, it can be great to just play with distortion on and the volume up, can give you an ego boost when it's needed!
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