#1
So I'm just learning in guitar lessons how to use the Circle of Fifths to figure out a what the specific note in a key signature in a believe a Major scale. What I've been doing it finding out how many sharps or flats it has then counting the number (1-7) to find the note.

For Example:

For 5 in the F I know F is on the flat side of the CoF and has 1 flat, so because it's 5 in it can't be flat. So then I count 5 over from F on the Order of Flats and get G, when the real note is C.


So what exactly am I doing wrong. And also when ever I have to figure out a 7 in say like Db I get D, but it's completely impossible to have a D in a Db scale. So help me out so I know how to study this.
Feed your mind.
#2
F has 5 what?

The CoF goes ...Eb Bb F C G D A... If you want to know the key signature for F, you go to the left one spot, denoting one flat. If you want to know the key signature for A, you count to the right three spots, denoting three sharps.


Edit: The D major scale goes D E F# G A B C#. Db should not appear.
#3
Quote by bangoodcharlote
F has 5 what?

The CoF goes ...Eb Bb F C G D A... If you want to know the key signature for F, you go to the left one spot, denoting one flat. If you want to know the key signature for A, you count to the right three spots, denoting three sharps.


Edit: The D major scale goes D E F# G A B C#. Db should not appear.



7 in a Major scale.

But I don't exactly know what your saying. So far I've got the Circle of Fifths as having two halves, the sharp half, and the flat half. The Sharp half goes C (0) G (1#) D (2#) A (3#) E (4#) B (5#) and the Flat side from F going F (1b) Bb (2b) Eb (3b) Ab (4b) Db (5b) and Gb (6b)

and then I have the Order of sharps as FCGDAEB and the order of flats as BEADGCF, so when I want to figure out 3 in A I look for A which is on the sharp side, see it has 3 sharps then go look at my order of sharps count over 3 from A get F and put a # on it making it F# when it's actually C#.


I'm a complete theory newb so keep that in mind when you try and explain this. xD
Feed your mind.
#4
Sharps are easy; you take the key before it and then add a sharp to the note right beneath the root.

Ex. A major scale. The key signature contains the entire key signature for D major, so it contains #s on C and F. Moreover, the scale contains a major 7th, so that G must be raised to G#, a semitone beneath A, giving you your third sharp.

Flats: (You will have to look at a CoF diagram to get this).
They also contain the entore key signature for the scale before them. For example, F has one flat, Bb, and Bb also has that Bb tone. However, it also has a flat on the key right after it. Eb comes right after Bb, so Bb contains the Bb from the F key signature, as well as an Eb since Eb comes directly after.
#5
I didn't quite understand that post either... I'm still not getting this right. Please try and stay with me, I'm not very knowledgeable in theory, your gonna have to dumb it down for me.


Edit: Figured it out by myself, and realized I'm an idiot. Thanks for the help man.
Feed your mind.
Last edited by Firebread at Jun 4, 2008,