#4
I can read it, I just dont know how to apply it to guitar.

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Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#5
I can.
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#6
I am going to have to start next school year with my first guitar class. I am pretty good playing wise and I can read music other than tabs just never took the time to learn on guitar.
#7
I can read it, but I'm kind of slow at working it out on guitar.

Don't know my fretboard well enough I suppose.
#9
i can read it, I do a lot of composing for string quartets and things like that so it's sort of necessary. I can't sight read for the guitar all that well though.

Quote by Shackman10
I can also read it...not just treble clef either


well really once you learn that It's not hard to figure out the other ones, except the percussion clef, because that one is kind of weird.
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#10
I play classical guitar, so yeah reading is a necessity. Learn to read! It will do A LOT more than simply enable you to play songs written in standard notation. It will make you much more familiar with chords, scales and composition in general. If you ever want to understand advanced music theory reading is a must.
#11
Quote by Captain Garry
I play classical guitar, so yeah reading is a necessity. Learn to read! It will do A LOT more than simply enable you to play songs written in standard notation. It will make you much more familiar with chords, scales and composition in general. If you ever want to understand advanced music theory reading is a must.

Off-topic slightly, but have you got any original pieces written for classical guitar?
I've looked all over YouTube and I can only find people playing old tunes.
#12
#13
I've learnt how to read music (notation), that's because I learnt classical to begin with.
The hardest thing about notation is the timing.
#14
I know bass clef inside out, upside down, still slow with treble clef though. I can work out parts, but I can't sight read.
Quote by Portuguese_boy
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#17
Since I started out as a viola player, I can fluently read Alto and Treble clefs on both viola and guitar (as in I can sight read, in time). My bass clef is getting there on guitar too, I played Upright Bass in orchestra and Concert Band my last two years of high school to get hands on experience with the clef, helped so much.

I'm actually pretty terrible at reading tabs, I prefer sheet music any day.
#18
Yeahhhh

I can, give me enough time :p

Im not very good at sight reading you see

I play from the Real Book in my jazz band a lot - i rarely play the melodies; only on guitar jazz pieces. But yeah i can do it
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#19
Quote by laurel333
Yeahhhh

I can, give me enough time :p

Im not very good at sight reading you see

I play from the Real Book in my jazz band a lot - i rarely play the melodies; only on guitar jazz pieces. But yeah i can do it



I've actually been playing melodies only so much lately, that I honestly think my chord sight-reading has been harmed so to speak. But I'm not really sure, cause I'm also experimenting with new kinds of voicings ala Jim Hall and such.
#20
I play trombone. so yeah, I can read music. But I choose not to read music for guitar.
#21
Quote by strat335
I play trombone. so yeah, I can read music. But I choose not to read music for guitar.


Yeah I generally prefer tabs for fretted instruments because they are more specific.
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#22
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
Yeah I generally prefer tabs for fretted instruments because they are more specific.


They are only specific in that they tell you what fret to play on, not what note to play, what rhythm to play with, how to accent, what your phrasing might be, if the line is ascending or descending, what your dynamics should be with any sort of specificity, or allowances for personal interpretation.


In short, TABs are so non-specific that they give you little freedom to interpret the music, only to copy others.
#23
also most guitar sheet music will tell you what string to play on and give fingerings if theres ambiguity
#24
Quote by Guitar_Theory
They are only specific in that they tell you what fret to play on, not what note to play, what rhythm to play with, how to accent, what your phrasing might be, if the line is ascending or descending, what your dynamics should be with any sort of specificity, or allowances for personal interpretation.


In short, TABs are so non-specific that they give you little freedom to interpret the music, only to copy others.


que?

Yeah I know if you read a tab nnd play it accurately theres little room for interpretation, but usually that's the point, when someone wants to play a rock song or something they usually want it to sound pretty similar to the original recording.
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#25
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#29
Quote by ouchies
I wouldn't say its necessary, believe it or not.

I DO know how to read though.


It's not necessary if you don't even plan on writing something down and communicating it to another musician quickly and efficiently.

My friends and I email eachother sheet music all the time that we've written out cause we want one another to learn parts and compositions, but we don't always have a chance to get together.
#30
Quote by Guitar_Theory
It's not necessary if you don't even plan on writing something down and communicating it to another musician quickly and efficiently.

My friends and I email eachother sheet music all the time that we've written out cause we want one another to learn parts and compositions, but we don't always have a chance to get together.


I use tabs and demo recordings for that, which is fine if you are in a standard rock band.

Or course I also write for piano and strings, and standard notation is necessary for that, but it isn't something that the average pop/rock guitarist will have to worry about.

Quote by gonzaw
Well, it IS the foundation to understand the basics of music, such as compass, figures, key signatures, and eventually scales, modes, etc...


I understood the majority of that stuff long before I learned how to read standard notation...
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#31
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
I understood the majority of that stuff long before I learned how to read standard notation...



You can understand theory without knowing how to read SN, but it certainly helps understand more concepts of music, specially western music...
#32
Quote by gonzaw
You can understand theory without knowing how to read SN, but it certainly helps understand more concepts of music, specially western music...


Yeah, I understand how it can help, but I hardly think it is necessary.
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#34
I can, I was a classical guitar major for a year in college before I decided to switch to music technology and recording arts. I can actually read music very well for the guitar.
#35
Quote by Guitar_Theory
I guess it's okay to not know it if it doesn't fit into your goal set. But I think eventually, you'd hit a wall where your music can't be communicated, your knowledge furthered, and your skills advanced, without knowing standard notation and being fluent in reading it.
But there's a difference between being able to read a piece of music and being able to play it on the guitar.
#36
Awesome guys (or gals).

I know how to read music for every other instrument I play, have no trouble with drum rhythms either, I just don't know the guitar's fretboard well enough yet.