#1
Can someone give some tips on writing a good rock n' roll/metalish guitar solo. How you should start, what techniques to use, what frets sound best together, etc.
#2
there's a number of ways to go about it...

either come up with something based on what the backing part is - or come up a idea and create the backing based on that.

think about the context of the song - do youi want the solo to mirror or compliment what's alrwady happening or to go in a different direction?
#3
dont rly know much, but dont open with shredding, build up 2 it and smash out some shred right at the climax of the solo
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#4
Quote by Andy.C
dont rly know much, but dont open with shredding, build up 2 it and smash out some shred right at the climax of the solo


depends on the feel of the song

if its something thrashy it dseserves al; out shred strate from the beginning and kinda of lighten up a little bit by the end
#5
Quote by pbuddyjman
Can someone give some tips on writing a good rock n' roll/metalish guitar solo. How you should start, what techniques to use, what frets sound best together, etc.


um, learn some music theory...... then practice what you learned. that oughta keep ya busy for a little while.
#6
record improvisations over backing and learn how to play the parts you like
Dancing In Your Dust
#7
Quote by pbuddyjman
Can someone give some tips on writing a good rock n' roll/metalish guitar solo. How you should start, what techniques to use, what frets sound best together, etc.


The fact that you asked 'what frets sound best together' suggests that you haven't learnt about scales, and that is a must for soloing. I mean, when I write solos I don't stick always to scales (though it is a reference point) but through learning them I have become very comfortable with intervals and how I can move up and down the neck, which is a useful thing to be able to do.
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#9
Start with your root note, then play in scale using a variety of different methods of phrasing. Insert legato, vibrato, harmonics, slides, bends and use of the whammy bar as it sounds good.

Make yourself heard.

If you understand all of that, go for it. If you don't, learn what to do before trying to do it.
#10
Quote by pbuddyjman
Can someone give some tips on writing a good rock n' roll/metalish guitar solo. How you should start, what techniques to use, what frets sound best together, etc.
Learn some theory. Read the sticky.

If your just begining to solo, play the pentatonic scale in 2 or 3 positions. Play the notes that feel right from this scale, what sounds right is what your looking for when you write music. Try to copy the rhthym from a singing melody.

You wont come up with anything fantastic, but this will get your technique and your phrasing ready for writing real solo's.

Than I want you to learn about; intervals, the major scale (do NOT learn any exotic scales, they will just confuse you), harmonic/melodic consonance, and than watch melodic control.
#11
A lot of rock solos revolve around the pentatonic scale. Usually the minor. If you're going for a more upbeat feel, remember that a regular Em scale is also a GM scale. So you can use the E scale in the key of G for a more upbeat sound. Duane Allman is a good example of that. Here's a listening suggestion for soloing: The Tragically Hip. They're from Canada, and don't have much exposure outside of there, but Rob Baker has some of the slickest licks, and he keeps his solos and lead lines relevant to the songs. Give them a listen.
#12
Quote by Hasil
A lot of rock solos revolve around the pentatonic scale. Usually the minor. If you're going for a more upbeat feel, remember that a regular Em scale is also a GM scale. So you can use the E scale in the key of G for a more upbeat sound. Duane Allman is a good example of that. Here's a listening suggestion for soloing: The Tragically Hip. They're from Canada, and don't have much exposure outside of there, but Rob Baker has some of the slickest licks, and he keeps his solos and lead lines relevant to the songs. Give them a listen.
Technically, thats not e minor pentatonic but G major pentatonic.
#13
just like everybody has already said, learn some theory. the first thing you probably want to learn is the major scale and how it is harmonized (you may already know this, maybe not). once you have it "down" in concept, then apply it to the guitar. learn where the scale roots are all over the fret board. from there start learning about intervals on the guitar and how to construct chords/arpeggios. of course people spend lots of time learning how to effectively apply this stuff, but if you get a basic handle on it you'll be surprised how quickly you can start improvising interesting ideas.

about the solo itself i would say that it is key to remember that a guitar solo is not about showing off your technical abilities or your fretboard prowess. a guitar solo is a chance to express an idea in a given amount of time. that said when writing a solo you might have some kind of idea how you want it to move, i.e. slow --> fast --> soft --> shredz. again these movements are not to impress anybody but to express your point! shredding and speed has its place, as does a one-note solo.

just some thoughts.
#14
Not the only way or the best way, but this is what I do.

The first thing I do is study the arppegios of chords and determind the
parent scale or tone center. I also pay attention to the druming.

I might improv or pratice doing solo over a movement and record it.
I'll go back and listen to it. Sometimes I'll get an idea from a riff.
Sometimes i get luckie and don't need to write solo becuase it
sound okay. Most of the time i need to go back and make corrections
or I get more ideas and experiment.

Then I'll go back and try to structure it with better phrasing.
This way the solo will have sometype of meaning to it.
I use the druming loop or the so call 8 count as a guide,
becuase the chords are structure or timed to the drumming.
It's easier to remove or change riff/phrasing.
It's probably because i learn other people solo one riff/section
at a time. Or bascailly going back to figure out what the hell
I did when i improv

I like to do questions and answers phrasing. I also like to alter
between accending and decending , fast notes and slow notes.
To me , it gives a solo dymamic or depth.
#15
Usually the minor. If you're going for a more upbeat feel, remember that a regular Em scale is also a GM scale. So you can use the E scale in the key of G for a more upbeat sound.


No. You need to read the theory sticky as well.
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#17
Yeah, the whole theory bit would help a lot. Try and listen to some solos you love, then use your newfound theory to understand how that lick or solo was created. Then use that knowledge and apply it to your playing. After a few songs you'll have a library of solo techniques. At least, that's how I learned most of my tricks. And vibrato, slides, trills
and ghost notes can add a whole 'nother layer to an otherwise lifeless solo. And, off-topic slightly but...
Quote by sisuphi


about the solo itself i would say that it is key to remember that a guitar solo is not about showing off your technical abilities or your fretboard prowess.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but weren't solos originally created to show off the technical prowess of a player?
#18
Make it up.
People writing songs that voices never shared
No one dared
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#19
Quote by Hasil
A lot of rock solos revolve around the pentatonic scale. Usually the minor. If you're going for a more upbeat feel, remember that a regular Em scale is also a GM scale. So you can use the E scale in the key of G for a more upbeat sound.

Please don't listen to this person.

For soloing, first learn some music theory, first by checking the sticky at the top of this forum. In addition, sign up for www.guitarbt.com or just find any backing tracks and record yourself over them. Then figure out what scales and licks you're using and whether you like them or not.
#20
Well, a couple people recommended not listening to me, and on this one I have to side with them. My bad. My practical theory knowledge is limited, so I probably shouldn't be tossing it around. I'm self-taught, as in taught myself the way around a fretboard, so I'll leave the theory to the folks who know what they're talking about. Humble apologies.
#21
Quote by Austyn6661
Yeah, the whole theory bit would help a lot. Try and listen to some solos you love, then use your newfound theory to understand how that lick or solo was created. Then use that knowledge and apply it to your playing. After a few songs you'll have a library of solo techniques. At least, that's how I learned most of my tricks. And vibrato, slides, trills
and ghost notes can add a whole 'nother layer to an otherwise lifeless solo. And, off-topic slightly but...


Correct me if I'm wrong, but weren't solos originally created to show off the technical prowess of a player?


no, not technical prowess.
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