#1
Would I learn scales better from memorizing them from a scale book, saying each note.

Or from manually finding them on the fretboard using the circle of fifths and saying each note.

What about the modes?
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#2
Depends on what kinda player and person you are, man. Some guys say finding them then learning the names doesn't work, some guys say just memorizing them doesn't work, so it's personal preference.

Me personally, I just played around and worked at it until I discovered what notes sound good with the others, then bought a Guitar Grimoire and placed the names. Just do whatever works for you, but don't go with what's comfortable just for the sake of it bein comfortable - it'll start a habit of you not pushing your boundaries.
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#3
learn the fifths
that way you understand how it works and not just memorzing
you want to be able to understand what yr doing and apply it to other things
#4
with guitar, you only have to learn a few positions and move up or down the neck for different keys, so it would be more beneficial to memorize the circle of fifths. just remeber the order of sharps and flats.

sharps F-C-G-D-A-E-B
Flats B-E-A-D-G-C-F
#5
i would say learn the scales based on the root note, then get a backing track and improv with it until ur comfortable (even if you have to think bout it, and struggle like hell to start)...thats how i learned them... as you can see everyone does it their own way though
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#6
Learn the notes and learn the patterns knowing the shapes and patterns is important for getting around without thinking heavily and for muscle memory. Knowing the note names is important because you need to know them to apply your theory knowledge. When you know the notes and the shapes they kind of blur together in a synergy of ownage. So, mate, the answer is all of them
#9
I generally don't focus learning scales around the fretboard, since if I get too used to it, when I switch instruments it would be more tedious...

Learn them theorically, learn how they are formed...
If you learn how they are formed (tetrachords, alterations, stuff), and learn the "tricks" of how to find them..
#10
Quote by gonzaw
I generally don't focus learning scales around the fretboard, since if I get too used to it, when I switch instruments it would be more tedious...

Learn them theorically, learn how they are formed...
If you learn how they are formed (tetrachords, alterations, stuff), and learn the "tricks" of how to find them..


I would say this is bad advice and only sounds good on paper.

Learn the shapes while at the same time learning the theory behind the scales, starting with intervals.

While learning the shapes and learning the formulas of the modes and each scale, you'll start to be able to visualize different intervals on your fretboard.
#11
Quote by ouchies
I would say this is bad advice and only sounds good on paper.

Learn the shapes while at the same time learning the theory behind the scales, starting with intervals.

While learning the shapes and learning the formulas of the modes and each scale, you'll start to be able to visualize different intervals on your fretboard.


+1, Learn the scales to the degree where you understand what they are, what they are used for, and how to apply them.