#1
So I've been playing for about 5 years, and I'm OK I guess and so I have a few people who want to pay me for lessons. First of all, I don't know what to do. I was thinking just show them some chords then give them picking excercises to help coordination. But I don't really know any. Should I just teach them songs and hope they get better? Secondly, how much should I charge, I'm not a real teacher so I don't want to make them pay that much. What's a fair price?
#3
I wouldn't charge them at all.
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Quote by MudMartin
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#5
ive been playing a year and about 9 months and im teaching ag uy i know for $10 bucks a lesson ( a lesson is about an hour and a little bit. i teach him during lunch at school :P). i started with the basic open chords and strumming. after that i told him to practice hitting individual notes in a chord, then moved on to picking exercises. i started with the basic 1234 on every string, then

d------------------------------3--4--5--6 just keep moving up one fret per string
a----------------2--3--4--5--------------
e--1--2--3--4----------------------------


thats where im at with him, its been 2 and a half months of teaching him and hes doing ok. teaching isnt hard, but its tedious
Quote by cakeandpiemofo
Quote by tuwyci
why are metal musicians prone to fatness?
Cause there music is heavy.


Writing music is hard D:
#6
just start with basic, open chords. then later move on to note names, and for warm ups, do chromatic exercises- one finger per fret for frets 1-4 on the E string, and play 16th notes (up down up down up down up down). then get them to coordinate switching that exercise from string to string.

charge about ten dollars.


EDIT:
Quote by Phillitalian
ive been playing a year and abou 9 months and im teaching s aguy i know for $10 bucks a lesson. i started with the basic open chords and strumming. after that i told him to practice hitting individual notes in a chord, then moved on to picking exercises. i started with the basic 1234 on every string, then

d------------------------------3--4--5--6 just keep moving up one fret per string
a----------------2--3--4--5--------------
e--1--2--3--4----------------------------


thats where im at with him, its been 2 and a half months of teaching him and hes doing ok. teaching isnt hard, but its tedious


damn, that's basically what I said, except explained better
#7
Quote by strat335


damn, that's basically what I said, except explained better


Look at it this way, your grammar is still better, even after i edited it :P
Quote by cakeandpiemofo
Quote by tuwyci
why are metal musicians prone to fatness?
Cause there music is heavy.


Writing music is hard D:
#8
What should I teach them about theory? My theory isn't that good anyway, I only know basic stuff.
#9
Ask them "how much are you willing to pay" and then raise the price from there because they are obviously going to low ball you. Then tell them how you are actually giving them a great deal. Also, lie about your experience, skill level, whatever it takes mate. If you know them personally guilt trip them into paying more because they are your friends, this might work I've never tried it but I definitely will some day. Also a risky move is to ask for more money after a price has been settled on by claiming that the agreed upon value was actually more than it was, this is risky because they might have written the original value down, or strongly committed it to memory. If they seem unsure about themselves, go down hard on them and they will crumble . A gamble, but perhaps worth a try.
#10
Also, after a few lessons guilt trip them into paying more by saying how hard it is to make money as a musician. If a student gets belligerent because of you constantly guilt tripping them for money its time to go for the honey pot because you have nothing to lose, since this student will most likely leave you anyway. Set up a situation where you can steal their guitar and blame it on someone else (another student perhaps ) and pawn the guitar off for money or keep the guitar for personal use if it is of proper quality.
#11
Well I think if you really don't know anything solidly, as in you may know exercises and such, but you don't know the practical reasoning behind why you do things, such as exercises, or why you play this line over this chord, you shouldn't really be teaching. I'd feel like I was lying to the person.

I mean I've been studying guitar pretty damn intensely for 5 years, and just finished my freshman year as a Music Education/Jazz Guitar major, and I still don't feel confident giving lessons because I don't want to BS people. I almost started giving lessons, but was only gonna teach very young kids and absolute beginners. I think if you don't REALLY know your ****, you shouldn't teach, and I don't say this as some kind of insult, I'm just saying that my first guitar teacher didn't know his ****, he would just TAB everything out for me and knew nothing about theory and what not, he just jammed in cover bands, and it sucked, I hated it.

I started to love guitar when I switched to this old ex-marine blues guitarist that knew about reading music, knew about jazz, learned guitar the old fashioned way of copying records and jamming in the military, and then learned all the theoretical stuff. He wasn't some jazz guitar master or anything, he was mainly a "play by ear" blues man, but damn was he good, and he knew the why's along with the how's. And he inspired me with his vast knowledge.

I hope that soliloquy made sense. I guess what I'm trying to say is that if you're gonna teach, have integrity about it, don't lie to your students, don't bull**** about your abilities, be honest with others and honest with yourself. If you don't, you'll make those of us that strive to be excellent (and some day government certified) teachers look very bad.
#13
Quote by Guitar_Theory
Well I think if you really don't know anything solidly, as in you may know exercises and such, but you don't know the practical reasoning behind why you do things, such as exercises, or why you play this line over this chord, you shouldn't really be teaching. I'd feel like I was lying to the person.


I know what you're saying which is why I don't feel like I should charge them much. I do know some theory, I play tuba and try to write for concert band so I have a general idea I just don't know everything. But can I teach them to play guitar, yes. So can ultimate-guitar.com as it did me they're just too ignorant to realize it.
Last edited by fretboardfury at Jun 5, 2008,
#14
Yeah as long as you teach what you know, I think you'd be fine. And once you think the student has gone as far as they can with you, recommend them to someone else, they'll appreciate your honesty, and you'll get excellent word-of-mouth PR points, which is how you really get students when you're working on your own.
#15
Quote by Guitar_Theory
And Captain Garry, I'm insulted at almost everything you've said. You denigrate the noble profession that is the educator.

That is, unless you were being sarcastic, in which case, carry on.



#16
As a side note, teaching something to someone helps you remember it better. So study up on stuff and teach it to him the next day. Don't go out of your league, of course, or you'll both be learning the wrong thing. But freshen up on the stuff you sort of know, then teach it to him when he's ready.

And as for the 1-2-3-4 picking exercise, I wouldn't recommend that. Why have them pick off chromatic notes when they can practice scales and picking at the same time?
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Quote by SG6578
That is regular hard maple...I'm 100% f*cking d*ck licking sure.
#17
Quote by Third3ye
And as for the 1-2-3-4 picking exercise, I wouldn't recommend that. Why have them pick off chromatic notes when they can practice scales and picking at the same time?


You do realise that that's a chromatic scale?

And i think the point is that you don't have to concentrate on the left hand much so you can focus on the right hand much more, whereas if you used different scales you would have to focus on both hands at once and might end up not concentrating on the right hand enough.