#1
So...a little background. I plan on slapping my fretless quite a bit. Please don't tell me about the slap tone on a fretless. I like it The thing is, I don't know what to coat my rosewood fingerboard with. I've heard that first, I need to get some mineral treatment for the wood to drain out the oil, which would prevent the epoxy/poly/whatever from settling into the rosewood.

Can anyone who slaps with rounds on their fretless hand me some advice on the pros/cons of the different types of coatings? Appreciated!
#2
Poly or epoxy will work pretty much the same for protecting a fretboard. I know that Tung oil will waterproof a wood, but I don't think it will do anything for protecting a fretless fretboard from the pounding of roundwounds.

And after seeing Les Claypool in April, I have started to try to slap on my fretless. It can sound good if you work it right but I am going to be coating my fretboard before I try going any further in the fretless slapping path.
#3
Thanks for the reply Are you going to be with Chuckles and the others?

Would anyone know how Claypool keeps his fingerboard from getting torn to pieces?
#4
probably one of 2 things- polyurethane or epoxy.
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#5
The answers probably out there on Carl Thompson's website somewhere, but I am too tired to wade through it right now, lol.

Maybe I'll just have to take a drive to Sonoma county and find out for y'all.
#8
Cool. Polyurethane it is! But the question is, how many coats? And can someone please guide me through the process? I've seen a few threads, but they all say to just apply it and sand it, and not to use spray-on.

What kind of poly should I buy? How long should I wait after applying the coat for sanding? Should I sand after each coat? What grit sand paper should I use? How often should I sand down and reapply however many coats of poly?
#9
Yea, I wanna know too. I used clear gloss poly and it came out really sticky, i'm pissed. I'm just gonna sand the whole thing down and use flats I guess.
#10
yeah you definately want to use poly, much easier than epoxy and it makes the fretboard look awesome.
'85 Fender Reissue '75 Jazz Bass ---> Ashdown MAG300h
Schecter C/SH-1 ---> Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
#11
I think Krylon makes spray poly. You're probably gonna need 2-3 coats depending on how thick you spray it. And you should sand inbetween coats.

Sly: Did you wait for it to cure?

Edit: Use 800 grit about 3 hours after applying, I think, and You need to wait abot 2 days after you put your last coat on for it to cure.
Last edited by hippiebass at Jun 6, 2008,
#12
Hippieman, I only waited one day(im an impatient bastard). I'll try the 800 grit and let it sit for 2 days. Should it be nice and glossy and smooth then?
#13
After searching here and there, I found one guy who said not to sand for the first 2 or 3 coats of poly to create a "base" for the coats of poly after that. He said he had 30 (thirty) coats of poly Thanks for the 2-3 coat suggestion, hippie. Anyone else have a same/different recommended number of coats?
#14
I've defretted many fingerboards, what you wanna do man, is get a cource sandpaper and sand the neck first, this will give the poly a place to to go and stick. You wanna use a foam brush to apply it you can get a decent one for like a dollar. The poly you wanna use, is just regular ol' furniture poly, Im sure they make special polys for fretboards, but I didnt find any of that in my home depot. Anyways how many coats is a personal prefrence. You dont want it to thick though. maybe 3mm tops. But to apply just dip the foam in the can,drain excess (make sure you are in a ventilated room at room temperature.) You do not wanna do this in a humid day or in a cold day. for obvious reasons. Then start at the nut and slowly go down to last "frets". At first all you will see is the poly rehidrading the scratched wood. But keep going until its al distributed and watch out for air bubbles. Either go ------> or <------- with youu brush do not mix match, that will create bubbles. Also let at least half hour or an hour to dry, then come with a finer, less cource sand paper and sand it again, and re apply. Wait, and then do it over again with a more finer, the more layers of finer sand papering will give you a smoother board. Also when sanding dont sand with a flat hand try to countur with the neck or else if you sand it to much you're going to hva it replaced cause you messed up the radius. Also you will notice the more times you sand and add the poly, the harder it will be to sand. Once it gets to that point sand a final time and apply poly. Leave it protected, dont let dust drop on it, or anything like it. Leave it for a day or 2, a week, if you can handle wating. Then you are done! A nice polyed neck. You can get a buffing wheel and buffin solution if you want it extra shiny but for me the natural poly shine was good enough. Also with rosewood, the more you sand the deeper the color gets, and the more beautiful it becomes,at times the wood that I worked with would have the most chocolatly brown colors I've ever seen. Sorry for the long post
#15
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Ah, that's great advice, thanks a lot!

Since you have so much experience and you mentioned home depot...

Where can I get simple wood veneer from? And how much should I expect to pay?
#16
It all depends on what kind of wood veneer you want, the grade, and size. Also just wondering what are you going to need a veneer for?
#17
Quote by bxcarracer
I've defretted many fingerboards, what you wanna do man, is get a cource sandpaper and sand the neck first, this will give the poly a place to to go and stick. You wanna use a foam brush to apply it you can get a decent one for like a dollar. The poly you wanna use, is just regular ol' furniture poly, Im sure they make special polys for fretboards, but I didnt find any of that in my home depot. Anyways how many coats is a personal prefrence. You dont want it to thick though. maybe 3mm tops. But to apply just dip the foam in the can,drain excess (make sure you are in a ventilated room at room temperature.) You do not wanna do this in a humid day or in a cold day. for obvious reasons. Then start at the nut and slowly go down to last "frets". At first all you will see is the poly rehidrading the scratched wood. But keep going until its al distributed and watch out for air bubbles. Either go ------> or <------- with youu brush do not mix match, that will create bubbles. Also let at least half hour or an hour to dry, then come with a finer, less cource sand paper and sand it again, and re apply. Wait, and then do it over again with a more finer, the more layers of finer sand papering will give you a smoother board. Also when sanding dont sand with a flat hand try to countur with the neck or else if you sand it to much you're going to hva it replaced cause you messed up the radius. Also you will notice the more times you sand and add the poly, the harder it will be to sand. Once it gets to that point sand a final time and apply poly. Leave it protected, dont let dust drop on it, or anything like it. Leave it for a day or 2, a week, if you can handle wating. Then you are done! A nice polyed neck. You can get a buffing wheel and buffin solution if you want it extra shiny but for me the natural poly shine was good enough. Also with rosewood, the more you sand the deeper the color gets, and the more beautiful it becomes,at times the wood that I worked with would have the most chocolatly brown colors I've ever seen. Sorry for the long post

Thanks

So I don't need to treat the rosewood to drain the oil first? I just need to sand it before applying the poly?
#18
I dont do it I feel like the sanding and poly'n is enough stress on the neck, you might wanna rehidrate the wood, and thats about it really. But I dont ussualy dont do it. I dont feel like its necessary. And I have a round wound on a poly neck sound on my youtube, the vid is crap, but you can see the fretless neck on it though. I have a sample piece of the fretboards I do I could send it to you if you want.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pceRv8cQKmM
#19
Quote by bxcarracer
It all depends on what kind of wood veneer you want, the grade, and size. Also just wondering what are you going to need a veneer for?


Instead of just filling the fret slots... Some people put veneer inside so there are more noticeable 'fret markers'.
#20
oh for fretmarkers, duh. I like making graphite fret liners, it pretty ingeneous really, you get .5 mm mechanical pencil refil a mortar and pestle and you grind the graphite real fine. It takes alot of graphite for the whole board. Anyways you grind it up and then I mix in sum epoxy diluted with vodka in a syringe and fill the lines. Makes it quite unique. If anyone wants to try it out tell me how it goes.
Last edited by bxcarracer at Jun 9, 2008,
#21
Ah, my mistake, my fretboard is actually maple Does that affect how many coatings orfpoly I should put on the fretboard?
#23
From what I remember that if you epoxy maple (as apposed to treating it with tung oil), it loses some of its "mwah".

Come to think of it, I have never seen a fretless with a maple fretboard. You need to post this up after you finish this project or Chuckles and I will come after you and demand that you do.
#24
Okay, nevermind! Was given the wrong information! It is rosewood

I'd still like a response for the 30 coats of poly. Some people say, like, 5, but then I've only heard one or two says that many?
#25
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
Okay, nevermind! Was given the wrong information! It is rosewood

I'd still like a response for the 30 coats of poly. Some people say, like, 5, but then I've only heard one or two says that many?



I'm on my second coat of pizoly. I'm shootin for 5. I'll let u know dude love
#27
What was the sound like on a maple fretless? The reason I ask is that when I was going to defret my Accu Bass, one of the reasons I was told not to was because of the maple fretboard and that I wouldn't get the distinctive "mwah" if I polyed it.
#28
Quote by anarkee
What was the sound like on a maple fretless? The reason I ask is that when I was going to defret my Accu Bass, one of the reasons I was told not to was because of the maple fretboard and that I wouldn't get the distinctive "mwah" if I polyed it.


I would also like to know this as I am planning on defretting (and using poly) on a bass with a maple fretboard.