#1
i love how the ivory and gold hardware rr5 looks but the only thing its lacking is the fr (i dont want to get one of the new rr5fr).. has anyone put a gold floyd rose on it to match the gold hardware?

or should i just get a schecter hellraiser c1 fr instead?
Sigs are too hard to think up
#2
Unless your trained in luthiery or know someone who is I'd go and pick up the schecter. Its pretty much at the other end of the shape scale, but as long as you like it. An original floyd unit will cost quite a lot on its own.
Rock on!
Gear

Gibson Les Paul Studio Ebony/Gold
Jackson RR5 Ivory w/Black Pinstripes
Epiphone Les Paul 100 *For Sale*
Yamaha FX370C
Marshall AVT150HX + AVT4x12
#3
If you like to change tunings and don't have a lot of free time to setup your tremolo bridge, then don't go for it unless you want to install it for divebombs only like Eddie Van Halen. Floating tremolos are pain, and they suck the tone and sustain out of a guitar. I didn't think so until I got one and faced these issues myself so I advise you to keep your guitar a hardtail.
#4
Why don't you want one of the rr5fr's? The Hellraiser is a completely different guitar (pickups, wood, shape, neck profile, etc). It's not really worth the trouble to put an OFR in an RR5 if you can buy one that comes with a FR.

Quote by Amer91
If you like to change tunings and don't have a lot of free time to setup your tremolo bridge, then don't go for it unless you want to install it for divebombs only like Eddie Van Halen. Floating tremolos are pain, and they suck the tone and sustain out of a guitar. I didn't think so until I got one and faced these issues myself so I advise you to keep your guitar a hardtail.


It really isn't that bad, yes there will be minor tone and sustain differences between 2 guitars that are exactly the same except for the FR, but it really isn't that big of a deal for most people. If you learn to set one up properly it shouldn't give you any problems even when you abuse it. Changing strings/tunings isn't a big deal either once you understand what you're doing. It's all about taking your time and properly learning how to do everything right the first time.
#5
Quote by Amer91
If you like to change tunings and don't have a lot of free time to setup your tremolo bridge, then don't go for it unless you want to install it for divebombs only like Eddie Van Halen. Floating tremolos are pain, and they suck the tone and sustain out of a guitar. I didn't think so until I got one and faced these issues myself so I advise you to keep your guitar a hardtail.



Ah, sir, so glad you could find room on the bandwagon, I thought it was running out of space.


Floyd's really aren't that bad, granted, if you don't use it, then it's not worth the hassle of changing tuning and strings, but if you had a decent amp, guitar and pickups, along with actual know-how of how to set-up and properly maintain a floating trem, then you'd be fine.


And to OP, The RR5-FR is already being sold, granted without gold-hardware, but that's neither here nor there really.
Funny words.
#6
Well you guys are right about them, I know how to set mine up perfectly and everything, but it still doesn't sound as good as a hardtail. Sure Vai, and Satriani have awesome tones if you ask me, but they have expensive amps and rack-mounted preamps, and effects that help in the process. If you're a player with just an amp, especially a tube amp, every little detail of the guitar counts. I like Floating tremolos, but if I were to perform, I would need to have a backup because it has a higher possibility of string breakage and I play songs with different tunings, so I don't have time to change it on a floyd rose. But if you stick to one to tuning, then it's OK to have one.