#1
does any have a technique or a way to help remember the notes on the fretboard because i just cant seem to do it. thanx in advance
#2
Just memorize the frets where the little dots or blocks are.
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#4
remeber that going from B to C is only one fret and going from E to F is only one fret
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#5
I read some guys technique (cant remember his name for credit) was to play an open C scale on all the open strings and first few frets. Then move your hand up one fret and play it again saying all the notes out loud the whole time. Then move up one more fret and so on
#6
The notes? Like A, etc.? and not the fret numbers-
well remember one fret is a half step and two frets is a whole step, there's no E flat or E sharp, and there's no such thing as A sharp, cuz that's B flat.

so start with the open string's note name, and then count up from there. Eventually you'll just remember.
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#7
It comes with time. For the most part, if you remember 2 things, you'll be fine.
1) The string names, and
2) The fact that E and B don't have sharps. For this, I just made up the word "Bcef" (pronounced as one word) to remember that. C is a fret higher than B, and F is a fret higher than E.
#8
i now how to find them etc. i just cant memorize where they are exactly on the fretboard. i know c is the next fret after b and there is a fret between c and d. i just cant memorize the exact places.
#10
Also, if you can just memorize the notes on the low E and the A string you basically have everything but the B string. Obviously the high E and the low E are going to be the same, so that is two. Then the low E and the D strings are related, and the A string and the G string are related. This means that if you find a note on the low E, just go down two strings (to the D string) and over two strings (to your right) and you have the same note in the next octave. The A and the G work the same way. In other words, if the 5th fret on the low E is an A, then you go to the D string on the seventh fret an you also have an A. Hope this helps a little.
#11
You may wanna do what I'm doing for remembering scales/notes. I will pick the major scale in a random key and find, then play, each note in order, but I'll find and play that note on every single string.

C Major Ex: The C note is on 6th string 8th fret, 5th string 3rd fret....etc.
The D note is on the 6th string 10th fret, 5th string 5th fret...etc.

It's working great so far, it takes me roughly 1-2 second(s) to find any note on any string.
#12
Quote by EpicOblivion
The notes? Like A, etc.? and not the fret numbers-
well remember one fret is a half step and two frets is a whole step, there's no E flat or E sharp, and there's no such thing as A sharp, cuz that's B flat.

so start with the open string's note name, and then count up from there. Eventually you'll just remember.


There is such a thing as A sharp. You can call the note either A sharp or B flat since they are enharmonic. Same as F#/Gb or Eb/D#, etc.
#13
Quote by EpicOblivion
The notes? Like A, etc.? and not the fret numbers-
well remember one fret is a half step and two frets is a whole step, there's no E flat or E sharp, and there's no such thing as A sharp, cuz that's B flat.

so start with the open string's note name, and then count up from there. Eventually you'll just remember.


...
#14
Quote by animetard
There is such a thing as A sharp. You can call the note either A sharp or B flat since they are enharmonic. Same as F#/Gb or Eb/D#, etc.


+1
#15
Your trying to lear where the notes are on the fretboard? Well work it out with using the fret markers for starters. Do this on the EAD strings only. Then you can work out where they are on the other strings by octaves. For Example, an A on the E is at the fifth fret and on a D is on the 7th, rite? Its really that simple honestly. Remember you do this every other string so the octaves are on E with D, A with G, D with B, G with E. You should then be sorted.
#17
Hey ironman1478,

How's the music going? I think learning how to memorize something is different from person to person. My methods of doing things will be more effective to me, but it might not be the same with you. So, I think it's good to ask your self, "What are the best ways for me to memorize something?" You can take inventory of what the other guys have offered from above, and try what works.

As for me, I start with one note a day. Like what Joe Satriani suggest in his instructional book. I first write down in paper what the note that I desire to completely memorize on the fretboard. And then hit all of the those same notes on all of the strings, starting from the low E string.

Example:

Let's say that for today I commit in practicing only the E notes of all the strings. So, I start from the low open E string, then to the 7th fret of the A string, then to the 2nd fret of D string, then to the 9th fret G string, then to the 5th fret of the B string, and then the open high E string.

I use a metronome as I practice this. First I start slow and then I increase the speed.

The next thing that I do is to turn off the lights when practicing this. I think turning off the lights will enable me to force myself to visualize the notes from my mind's eye. I think this will also be an advantage when doing gigs that have irritating light effects. lol.

The other thing that I do as I practice what I've mentioned is to say the location of the note out loud as I hit the note.

Hope this helps!

Take care,
Jose Daniel
Positive and negative emotions cannot occupy the mind at the same time. One or the other must dominate. It is your responsibility to make sure that positive emotions constitute the dominating influence of your mind. - Napoleon Hill
#18
It might also help if you print out a blank fretboard diagram, or draw your own, and fill in each fret with its corresponding note. Print out a few blank ones and just keep filling them out, the repetition will help you retain the information.



Fretboard Diagram Link
#19
To make it easier for you, focus on learning only the natural notes. Once you've got those figured, the location of the sharps and flats will be completely obvious to you. You won't need to learn where they are.
#20
I found learning the fretboard a lot easier once I learned the A Natural Minor (C Major works...) scale everywhere on the fretboard. Also... since when was E# and B# not possible? Never.
#22
What does the # sign by the notes mean and the ones that are like Ab, Bb, Gb..what does that mean??

I'm new to this as well >.>
#23
Quote by Rave765
What does the # sign by the notes mean and the ones that are like Ab, Bb, Gb..what does that mean??

I'm new to this as well >.>


# = sharp
b = flat

Ab = G#
Bb = A#
Gb = F#
#25
Quote by JubeiTHPS
I found learning the fretboard a lot easier once I learned the A Natural Minor (C Major works...) scale everywhere on the fretboard. Also... since when was E# and B# not possible? Never.


Because a half step (1 fret) up from E is F, and a half step up from B is C. Everything else uses a whole step (2 frets) to get to the next natural note. i.e. C, C#/Db, D, D#/Eb, E, F, F#/Gb, G, G#/Ab, A, A#/Bb, B, C
#26
In standard tuning I memorize it like this

Since you got your EADGBE (Eat all day get big easily) and since the 5th fret of one string is the open next string, except for the G string where it's the 4th, keeping in mind the rule that B goes directly to C and E goes directly to F. Now you can just count up or down the notes.....
Like say you wanna know the 2nd fret on the G string. You know the 4th fret on the G string is B, so you just count down 2, and since 2 frets is usually a whole letter down, you know it's an A note.
Or if you wanna know the 8th fret of the B string, you know that the 5th fret is E so you count up 3. 5th:E 6th:F 7th:F# 8th:G, so the 8th fret is G.

Once you get into the higher numbers you can also use the octave notes. Each 12th fret is the same note as the string open.
So if you wanna know uhhhhh the 20th fret of the D string, you know that the 12th fret is D, and five more frets would make it the next string, G, so then you just add 3 more, and its 1st: G#/Ab 2nd: A 3rd: A#. So the 20th fret is A#, it'll just always sound higher pitched

The only real rules you gotta keep in mind are B goes directly to C, and E goes directly to F. They do not pass go. They do not collect 200 dollars.
The rest is just counting really.

Oh this should help http://www.cyberfret.com/first-fret/note-names/index.php

And Tom183 I REALLY like that trainer.
#28
Quote by JubeiTHPS
I found learning the fretboard a lot easier once I learned the A Natural Minor (C Major works...) scale everywhere on the fretboard. Also... since when was E# and B# not possible? Never.
Of course it's possible! We all know that E# is the same note as F, but that doesn't mean that it does not exist. Same goes with B#.

In fact, I recently learned a classical piano piece which has Fb and Cb all over the place on the sheet music.
#29
What three things helped me alot were: "Music Theory for Guitar: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know But Were Afraid to Ask", 'Fretboard Warrior' program, and... practice.