#1
I got the audition piece for the school jazz band and there are a couple chords where I'm not exactly sure how to make them.

They are:

G7(b5)

Cb7(b5)

Maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I think that the (b5) means that the chord has a flat 5th?

Ok
#4
But if the G7 has a flat 5th and the 5th is an open string, I have to play the note on the next string, but that string is already being fretted!?
#5
try moving up a position
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#7
Quote by coffeeguy9
check the link on "Yazz Chords" in my signature. I wrote that lesson just for people in your position.


<33
That helped!
#8
Edit:

Ohh, didn't see the flat 5th part. Those are probably some nasty sounding chords. =/
And I mean that in the best possible way.
Last edited by SilenceIsGolden at Jun 7, 2008,
#9
Quote by no.mop
But if the G7 has a flat 5th and the 5th is an open string, I have to play the note on the next string, but that string is already being fretted!?

these are jazz chords, and you almost never play Jazz chords in the open position in a band setting, at least in my experience.
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#10
I have no guitar as usual but...G7b5

-
-2 (b5)
-4 (major 3rd)
-3 (b7)
-x
-3 (root)

Move this shape to the 7th fret for Cb7b5. However, B doesn't have a #, so wouldn't the root note of this chord just be C?

I guess it depends on the context of the music tho right...?
#12
Quote by Captain Garry
your not going to get into jazz band without knowing what a 7b5 chord is


Thank goodness they won't have a grammar test

I remember one guitarist in my school's jazz band started the year not knowing what a major 7th chord is... but I went to a rather small high school.
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#13
Quote by Captain Garry
your not going to get into jazz band without knowing what a 7b5 chord is


Cut the guy some slack, I'm sure he'll be fine.....
#14
Quote by no.mop
I got the audition piece for the school jazz band and there are a couple chords where I'm not exactly sure how to make them.

They are:

G7(b5)

Cb7(b5)

Maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I think that the (b5) means that the chord has a flat 5th?

Ok



One way of playing G7 is..

e
B
G4
D3
A5
E3

So to play a G7b5 you would flatten the fifth, and it would look like..

e
B
G4
D3
A4
E3

If you don't like the way that sounds you can use octave displacements to move around the notes. Also, if you're playing with a band it is OKAY to omit the root.


e
B2
G4
D3
A(4)
E(3)

Theres a few ways to make up new voicings. Take ones you know, and alter them. To come up with this voicing, I just took the b5 and moved it up an octave (from 4th fret on the A string to 2nd fret on the B string.) The notes in the parentheses dont have to be played, but obviously can be if you want to. This shape is movable too, so you can move these up to the 8th fret and use that as C7(b5)
#16
Quote by mikeman
You can just play G7. Its what I did in Jazz band.


No. You can't.

BIG difference in sound between G7 and G7(b5).
#18
Quote by mikeman
You can just play G7. Its what I did in Jazz band.

You were probably able to get away with it in a school jazz band because school jazz bands rarely play actual jazz. In a real jazz setting, you'd better play the b5 or leave out the fifth if it's already being covered at your discretion.
#19
3434x3 or 3434xx if you can't pull that off. There are a lot of other ways to play a Gb7, one such way will be analyzed below.

7b5 root position on the fifth string is a much more practical position for the beginning jazz guitarist, and at C that's x34356, and you can move that up to 10 for G7b5.
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#20
Quote by Me2NiK
3434x3 or 3434xx if you can't pull that off. There are a lot of other ways to play a Gb7, one such way will be analyzed below.

I'd recommend the second way regardless of whether or not you can pull it off. If I'm comping with a band, I wouldn't usually, want the high E ringing out and the G has already been covered anyway. The four-string chord will give a better sound for a backing.
#21
Personally I think having the third as a high voice is an ugly way to phrase a 7b5.
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#22
Quote by Me2NiK
Personally I think having the third as a high voice is an ugly way to phrase a 7b5.

Some cases, sure; a lot of it will depend on the progression and where the different voices are leading. I was simply pointing out how I'd want the sound to be.